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Christianity is based on Egyptian Myths - Jesus Christ is Horus

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posted on Jul, 14 2007 @ 02:02 PM
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its so funny how you gave all that he bashed all that evicence and gave no otherwise proof eh




posted on Jul, 15 2007 @ 05:05 PM
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There was a legend that Cush had been cut up and sent to the four corners of the the earth.


Oh now THAT is very interesting. I've traced Cush to China and Ethiopia. In ancient Chinese writings, it mentions something called the President of the Four Mountains, which I assumed had something to do with either the pole star or a polar constellation, symbollized as the president, being aligned with four specific pyramidal type structures on the earth, which in turn represented the four directions of the compass, the four winds, and etc

i wonder if this legend about Cush plays into that.



posted on Jul, 15 2007 @ 06:41 PM
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Mysteri, were you referring specifically to me in your last post? If so, I have posted my sources before & now posting other sources that more closely relate to this particular thread. So, I don't think that I'm much lacking in "evidence." In the future, consider using someone's Member Name if you happen to be addressing that person...Not only is it more polite, but it also eliminates any confusion as to who you may be talking to.


I might mention that, back on page 7 of this thread, I posted a link to a different thread where I recounted the early history of Egypt and listed my sources there. While the info I posted there has no real bearing on this thread, the sources I listed there are the same sources I used for posting here. For the sake of convenience, here's that same link again.

Other sources for my info also include:
The Egyptian Book of the Dead by E. Wallace Budge, which describes not only how Egyptians wrote their Heiroglyphs, but the religion as well. I think this source was mentioned in this thread before now...
The Art of Ancient Egypt by Gay Robins, which came in handy when I (& Byrd too!) were posting here about the Egyptian artwork had displayed the differing aspects of divine-merges. Egyptian art was very highly structured in most time-periods in their history.
Heiroglyphs & the Afterlife in Ancient Egypt, by Werner Foreman & Stephen Quirke, which also deals with Heiroglyphs as they were used with the religion.
And, last but not least, The Mystery & Meaning of the Dead Sea Scrolls, by Hershel Shanks, which describes the content & history of the earliest forms of the Christian Religion, which formed its base from the ancient form of the Hebrew-practiced Judaism.

With the exception of Budge's book (which I'd last checked out from the local library more than 3 years ago), all of these (& those I listed as my resources at the link) are some of the books in my own personal library about Egypt.



posted on Jul, 17 2007 @ 07:47 PM
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Christianity was twisted in its first years of existence to replace that of the people they encountered because their current religions didn't satisfy them. Its just business. A religion willing to change for its people rather then the other way around will always survive, so long it keeps consistent with its message.

I believe it, and have no problem with it. So long the simple message of love thy neighbor as thy self is withheld, it will be a Christian



posted on Jul, 18 2007 @ 02:51 AM
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This has been debunked by Egyptologists and is mostly wishful thinking by the authors. That is they alter and interpret the Horus myths to fit their preconceived notions. Horus was a generic deity in Egypt and had thousands of different forms and myths. It's easy to pick and choose your stories and make it sound somewhat plausible. The fact is, many of these supposed attributes of Horus can not be verified by any Egyptian manuscripts, unless one deliberately mistranslates certain words. There has been an absolute flood of anti god, anti christian literature in recent years in the west. I guess they are prepping you guys to accept antichrist.

From the Wikipedia article
en.wikipedia.org...



The suggestion of parallels with such myths, however, has gained little traction in the academic community. Advocates of the Jesus Myth theory citing the parallels are frequently discovered to be citing dubious sources, and are accused of presenting implausible parallels, advocating particular theologies to replace Christianity, and using non standard terms (e.g. anup the baptiser rather than Anubis the anointer/embalmer) which others fail to recognize. In 1962, Judaism scholar Samuel Sandmel cautioned against this practice and adapted the term 'Parallelomania' to describe it. "We might for our purposes define parallelomania as that extravagance among scholars which first overdoes the supposed similarity in passages and then proceeds to describe source and derivation as if implying a literary connection flowing in an inevitable or predetermined direction."



posted on Jul, 20 2007 @ 01:20 AM
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Most all of this is a great read. However with something as strong as faith you can have all thr proof in the world and someone will not agree, such is faith.



posted on Aug, 2 2007 @ 04:26 PM
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You ever think that maybe the egyptians sort of stole things from the jews. the enslaved end up transforming there captors more then they realized.



posted on Aug, 2 2007 @ 04:38 PM
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chicken or the egg there are solar messiahs dating back for much longer, egyptians are just a good, well known example. its more likely that the egyptians stole it from the sumarian god utu...who surprisingly enough...follows the same sort of story.



posted on Aug, 2 2007 @ 07:49 PM
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Originally posted by ZGhorus
chicken or the egg there are solar messiahs dating back for much longer, egyptians are just a good, well known example. its more likely that the egyptians stole it from the sumarian god utu...who surprisingly enough...follows the same sort of story.



Problem is, they didn't start out as solar deities. If you read the oldest sumerian texts (which really aren't from Sumer as there are no surviving texts from Sumer, but stories written during Akkadia and Babylon about the events of Sumer), Utu wasn't even a blip on the radar screen. The originals were Enki, Enlil and An (or Anu). They were never referred to as sky gods of any kind. They lived here, not up in the sky, with the exception of An (Anu), who was busy elsewhere in the universe.



[edit on 2-8-2007 by undo]



posted on Aug, 2 2007 @ 07:56 PM
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Here's a good link for anyone interested. The Two babylons
Some of it's a little "over-my-head", but it explains Most, if not all mythology.



posted on Aug, 2 2007 @ 11:21 PM
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Horus of Egypt is Tammuz of Babylon

Isis of Egypt is Semiramis of Babylon

Osiris of Egypt is Nimrod of Babylon.



All the false religions are set up to keep mankind from seeing the Jesus the Messiah.

Nimrod, Baal and Tammuz of Babylon have many names(No Order)......Zeus, Zoroaster, Odin, Hercules, Thor, Ra, Marduk, Shamash, Molech, Jupiter, Atlas, Dagon, Apollo, Neptune, Cupid Etc. Etc. Etc.

It all just different versions of the story from Babylon that morphed.



posted on Aug, 3 2007 @ 01:22 AM
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Zeitgeist, apart from already knowing that religion is an entire ball of crap, proves that religion is an entire ball of ****



posted on Aug, 3 2007 @ 01:59 AM
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only problems are Jesus actually existed horus did not Jesus's existence is recorded in more that just the bible the jewish temples kept records of his crimes against God......and the roman kept record of his crimes against the person closest to the gods ceasar......see all these are proofs that Jesus existed and the story of horus was just some warped vision demons gave to the egyptians sorry man



posted on Aug, 3 2007 @ 05:51 AM
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There are a whole nexus of middle eastern myths from both Egypt and Mesopotamia that are far older than Judaism or Christianity that are the source of the motifs of not just the Jesus story but of the Moses one as well... Zoroaster (cir. 1100 BCE) is said to have been found as an infant floating in a basket of reeds in a river. Some of these motifs, most notably the lost and found (or cast adrift) infant and the dying and resurrected god were almost required to give any mythos or spiritual teachings any validity in the ancient world. From what I have read the currents of middle eastern thought were moving in such a direction that between the one god of neoplatonic thought to the interface of Judaism and Greek thought in places like Alexandria to the merging of myths and symbols as in both Christianity and Mirthraism (another version of Zoroasterism) that a Christ was needed to finish the synthesis whether or not Jesus existed or not.

I highly recommend Joesph Campbell's four volume "The Masks of God".... ("Primitive, Oriental... Occidental and Creative Mythology") as an excellent primer on the subject.



posted on Aug, 3 2007 @ 05:53 AM
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Originally posted by thestatue
only problems are Jesus actually existed horus did not Jesus's existence is recorded in more that just the bible the jewish temples kept records of his crimes against God......and the roman kept record of his crimes against the person closest to the gods ceasar......see all these are proofs that Jesus existed and the story of horus was just some warped vision demons gave to the egyptians sorry man


You are incorrect in that... it has now been quite adequately proven by now that most if not all the pagan and Jewish mentions of Jesus were later insertions by Christian scribes.



posted on Aug, 3 2007 @ 07:20 AM
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Originally posted by grover
There are a whole nexus of middle eastern myths from both Egypt and Mesopotamia that are far older than Judaism or Christianity that are the source of the motifs of not just the Jesus story but of the Moses one as well... Zoroaster (cir. 1100 BCE) is said to have been found as an infant floating in a basket of reeds in a river.


No offense, but poppycock. Zoroaster is Nimrod of Babylon. Archaeologist can trace Zoroaster to at least 2000 BC.






I highly recommend Joesph Campbell's four volume "The Masks of God".... ("Primitive, Oriental... Occidental and Creative Mythology") as an excellent primer on the subject.


I highly recommend the Bible. As far as the Masks of God goes, I don't suspect it would be too hard to chop his conclusions to pieces with facts.



posted on Aug, 3 2007 @ 07:32 AM
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After Harrison but before Walker came another atheist, Joseph Campbell, (1904–1987), who built a large part of his thinking on the weak foundations laid out by Harrison. As an American author, editor, and teacher known primarily for his writings on myths, Campbell used his own unique forms of sophistry to undermine and deny the ancient evidence that points to the events recounted in the early chapters of Genesis.


www.theparthenoncode.com..." target="_blank" class="postlink" rel="nofollow">//www.theparthenoncode.com...



posted on Aug, 3 2007 @ 07:53 AM
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Originally posted by Karilla
Here's a link to Zeitgeist - the movie.

The first third of the film deals with this subject, and the rest is pretty informative too!

It certainly is compelling, and I have yet to see anybody refute the connection. And if it does all come down to sun-worship, then why have the establishment gone to such lengths to "demonise" the sun? Most people I know actually fear the sun in a slight way.


People fear the sun? are you serious?

Egypt is not the only ripoff. General European paganism is similar.
The christmas tree is pagan. Norse pagans/vikings used to put evergreens in their houses decorated with dry apples to keep green in the house all winter long.
We celebrate yule around dec. 20/21. Which is the day celebrating the birth of the God, who is represented by the sun.
The Easter Egg is a Goddess symbol of fertility. Pagans will bury a decorated egg in the garden to increase fertility. Which falls into the same time of year.

The theory behind it is that when Christianity wanted to recruit pagans, they had to make the holidays and themes similar so it was an easier and more alluring transition.
I think that is why Mary is in the picture, to have some feminine element.


Many Christians have accepted the connection, so what they do is omit the pagan parts, Halloween, Easter Eggs, and Christmas trees. But still seem to follow the same holidays.



posted on Aug, 3 2007 @ 08:13 AM
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I have no intention of arguing with a fanatic like you Sun Matrix... you are predictable and boring and your connections are totally off kilter per usual.

Try reading Karen Armstrong's "The Great Transformation: The Beginnings of our Religious Traditions" or Robin Lane Foxes two books on the subject "Pagans and Christians; Religion and the Religious Life from the Second Century to the Rise of Constantine" and his "Unauthorized Version: Truth and Fiction in the Bible".

I know that you won't even consider reading them though but perhaps somebody with a more open mind and intelligence on here might.

I have studied both Campbell's work and Armstrong's as well for quite a few years now and I would highly suggest reading them before you discount them off the cuff without first hand knowledge of them. And before you start, I have read the Bible front to back several times now and in my humble opinion, most of it is better understood through the lens of metaphor (and richer as well) than to try and read it literally.

[edit on 3-8-2007 by grover]



posted on Aug, 3 2007 @ 08:22 AM
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BTW Sun Matrix your source quoted about Joseph Campbell is as biased as you.

en.wikipedia.org...


The Hero with a Thousand Faces

Campbell explores the theory that important myths from around the world that have survived for thousands of years all share a fundamental structure, which Campbell called the monomyth.

This fundamental structure contains a number of stages, which include (1) a call to adventure, which the hero has to accept or decline, (2) a road of trials, regarding which the hero succeeds or fails, (3) achieving the goal or "boon," which often results in important self-knowledge, (4) a return to the ordinary world, again as to which the hero can succeed or fail, and finally, (5) application of the boon in which what the hero has gained can be used to improve the world.

In a well-known quote from the introduction to The Hero with a Thousand Faces, Campbell wrote:
“ A hero ventures forth from the world of common day into a region of supernatural wonder: fabulous forces are there encountered and a decisive victory is won: the hero comes back from this mysterious adventure with the power to bestow boons on his fellow man.[1] ”

The classic examples of the monomyth relied upon by Campbell and other scholars include the Buddha, Moses, and Christ stories, although Campbell cites many other classic myths from many cultures which rely upon this basic structure.

While Campbell offers a discussion of the hero's journey by using the Freudian concepts popular in the 1940s and 1950s, the monomythic structure is not tied to these concepts. Similarly, Campbell uses a mixture of Jungian archetypes, unconscious forces, and Arnold van Gennep's structuring of rites of passage rituals to provide some illumination.[2] However, this pattern of the hero's journey influences artists and intellectuals worldwide, suggesting a basic usefulness for Campbell's insights not tied to academic categories and mid-20th century forms of analysis.

The Masks of God

His massive four-volume work The Masks of God covers mythology from around the world, from ancient to modern. Where The Hero with a Thousand Faces focused on the commonality of mythology (the “elementary ideas”), the Masks of God books focus upon historical and cultural variations the monomyth takes on (the “folk ideas”). In other words, where The Hero with a Thousand Faces draws perhaps more from psychology, the Masks of God books draw more from anthropology and history. The four volumes of Masks of God are as follows: Primitive Mythology, Oriental Mythology, Occidental Myth, and Creative Mythology.

Campbell's original voice

Campbell relied often upon the writings of Carl Jung as an explanation of psychological phenomena, as experienced through archetypes. But Campbell did not necessarily agree with Jung upon every issue, and had very definite ideas of his own.

A fundamental belief of Campbell's was that all spirituality is a search for the same basic, unknown force from which everything came, within which everything currently exists, and into which everything will eventually return. This elemental force is ultimately “unknowable” because it exists before words and knowledge. Although this basic driving force cannot be expressed in words, spiritual rituals and stories refer to the force through the use of "metaphors" - these metaphors being the various stories, deities, and objects of spirituality we see in the world. For example, the Genesis myth in the Bible ought not be taken as a literal description of actual events, but rather its poetic, metaphorical meaning should be examined for clues concerning the fundamental truths of the world and our existence.

Accordingly, Campbell believed the religions of the world to be the various, culturally influenced “masks” of the same fundamental, transcendent truths. All religions, including Christianity and Buddhism, can bring one to an elevated awareness above and beyond a dualistic conception of reality, or idea of “pairs of opposites,” such as being and non-being, or right and wrong. Indeed, he quotes in the preface of The Hero with a Thousand Faces: "Truth is one, the sages speak of it by many names." which is a translation of the Rig Vedic saying "Ekam Sat Vipra Bahuda Vadanthi."

Campbell was fascinated with what he viewed as basic, universal truths, expressed in different manifestations across different cultures. For example, in the preface of The Hero with a Thousand Faces, he indicated that a goal of his was to demonstrate similarities between Eastern and Western religions. In his four-volume series of books "The Masks of God", Campbell tried to summarize the main spiritual threads common throughout the world. Tied in with this, was his idea that many of the belief systems of the world which expressed these universal truths had a common geographic ancestry, starting off on the fertile grasslands of Europe in the Bronze Age and moving to the Levant and the "Fertile Crescent" of Mesopotamia and back to Europe (and the Far East), where it was mixed with the newly emerging Indo-European (Aryan) culture

Scholars who influenced Campbell

Campbell often referred to the work of modern writers James Joyce and Thomas Mann in his lectures and writings. Anthropologist Leo Frobenius was important to Campbell’s view of cultural history. He often indicated that the single most important book in his intellectual development was Oswald Spengler's The Decline of the West.

Campbell's ideas regarding myth and its relationship to the human psyche are dependent on the work of Carl Jung, whose studies of human psychology, as previously mentioned, greatly influenced Campbell. Campbell's conception of myth is closely related to the Jungian method of dream interpretation, which is heavily reliant on symbolic interpretation. Jung's insights into archetypes were in turn heavily influenced by the Bardo Thodol (also known as the The Tibetan Book of the Dead). In his 1981 text The Mythic Image, Campbell quotes Jung on the Bardo Thodol, who states that it "belongs to that class of writings which not only are of interest to specialists in Mahayana Buddhism, but also, because of their deep humanity and still deeper insight into the secrets of the human psyche, make an especial appeal to the layman seeking to broaden his knowledge of life"... "For years, ever since it was first published, the Bardo Thodol has been my constant companion, and to it I owe not only many stimulating ideas and discoveries, but also many fundamental insights" (Campbell 1981:392).

Campbell studied mythology under Professor Heinrich Zimmer while a young student at Columbia. Zimmer taught Campbell that myth (rather than a guru or spiritual guide) could serve in the role of a personal mentor, in that its stories provide a psychological roadmap for the finding of oneself in the labyrinth of the complex modern world. Zimmer relied more on the meanings of mythological tales (their symbols, metaphors, imagery, etc.) as a source for psychological realization than upon psychoanalysis itself. Campbell later borrowed from the interpretative techniques of Jung and then reshaped them in a fashion that followed Zimmer's beliefs- interpreting directly from world mythology. This is an important distinction because as it serves to explain why Campbell did not directly follow Jung's footsteps in applied psychology. [quote:]







[edit on 3-8-2007 by grover]



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