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Terror groups hide behind Web encryption

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posted on Jan, 8 2004 @ 11:13 PM
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I know this is old news, but, this really got my attention--02/05/2001 - Updated 05:17 PM ET-- Just 7 months and less than 6 days befor the attacks on the US. I personally do not remember any "Talk" about Osama, or anything about terrorist cells planning to attack the US. (Maybe I just wasn't paying much attention as I do today). If anybody recalls any MAJOR discussion and reports pre 9-11, please correct my idiocity(is this a word?). Anywho here is da link:

www.usatoday.com...




posted on Jan, 8 2004 @ 11:49 PM
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Encryption has long been targeted by the government because its now possible for anyone to use it, where before the internet age primarily only governments had systems for encryption of information. As for the concept of a "master key" to be filed with the federal government, thats so absolutely stupid, because that makes the encryption basically worthless if someone compromises the master key held by the government. I would be very interested to know what type of encryption Ramzi Yousef used to secure documents that took the NSA a year to crack, as usually they have rather effective methods to crack known crypto. Even in the event that a law was enacted requireing backdoors be written into crypto for the feds, private individuals with experience in programming could create their own crypto systems.


tr

posted on Jan, 9 2004 @ 12:45 AM
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Go to the way bak machine website- (www.archive.org) do a search for www.above topsecret.com) you can choose the date pre 911. I noted an interesting post by candygirl1224 about the nwo being the republicans that seemed rather insightful. lots of stuff about al-queda, etc

[Edited on 9-1-2004 by tr]



posted on Jan, 9 2004 @ 05:54 AM
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from the article...

"Ramzi Yousef, the convicted mastermind of the World Trade Center bombing in 1993, used encrypted files to hide details of a plot to destroy 11 U.S. airliners"

They had warning of this style of attack, they knew something. Why didn't the government act on their information and investigations by FBI agents? Just look at Bush administration policy and you'll understand why they would.


tr

posted on Jan, 21 2004 @ 09:24 PM
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I'm new to the internet and computers. I bought ghost surf at the local office depot. The next thing I know Adelphia is all over my computer. Norton Internet security keeps alerting me to attacks which turn out to be Adelphia and comcast. I read my contract and it says no proxies. So, I'm wondering why do they sell ghost surf? Who is it good for? Do all cable companies and dial up services have that restriction? I just wasted thirty bucks. (chucked ghost surf)

I guess if you use encryption or proxies you are a suspect for terrorism. So I guess forget the encryption stuff and any notion of privacy, huh? I can see where the internet could be abused.

So I just openly complain about crud. The heck with privacy.



posted on Jan, 21 2004 @ 09:30 PM
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Originally posted by tr
I'm new to the internet and computers. I bought ghost surf at the local office depot. The next thing I know Adelphia is all over my computer. Norton Internet security keeps alerting me to attacks which turn out to be Adelphia and comcast. I read my contract and it says no proxies. So, I'm wondering why do they sell ghost surf? Who is it good for? Do all cable companies and dial up services have that restriction? I just wasted thirty bucks. (chucked ghost surf)

I guess if you use encryption or proxies you are a suspect for terrorism. So I guess forget the encryption stuff and any notion of privacy, huh? I can see where the internet could be abused.

So I just openly complain about crud. The heck with privacy.


I know when I have Bearshare running in the background, norton goes haywire. Even if I allow the proxies, it takes people downloading from me as an attack. There might also be spyware. Just a suggestion


tr

posted on Jan, 21 2004 @ 09:42 PM
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yeah I tried removing spywear -adaware. I think I can't get rid of all spyware. win media player, real one got alexa or something. I don't know. I don't do file sharing. I'm so afraid of legal bs.

I freak out just putting my cds on med. plyr thinking someday some lawyer will say I accidently shared something. i even tried to just delete media player. you know it can't be done. Probably miss it but it's weird I deleted the program files manually they magically reappear. Probably against some bs contract somewhere I can't remember them all................................................................................................................................................mon ey for wars can't feed the poor. ...THAT's why terrorism starts. Then we have counter terrorism ...which is terrorism WE do...but after all its all good right? Terrorism, that is?

[Edited on 21-1-2004 by tr]Make love not war

[Edited on 21-1-2004 by tr]



posted on Jan, 21 2004 @ 10:09 PM
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All the software out there like Ghost Surf and what not tend to be more trouble than they are worth. Its easier and better in the long run to learn how to customize your browser(s) to leave less traces (java, js, cookies, header) and to learn to effectively use web proxies. I find it very hard to say that a ISP would have it in the AUP that a customer could not use a proxy, perhaps it was meant as one could not run a proxy from their connection?

I don't think the use of proxies and encryption lends itself to being an indicater that one is involved in terrorist so much as nefarious things such as cracking, spam, warez trading, etc. Encryption also is used in ways to insure the integretiy of files (md5 sums of source to prevent tampering) protect database (md5/sha1 hashs instead of plain text passwords and sensitive information) and gpg signed emails for authenticity of a message. Encryption on some level is being used at almost all times from every computer, regardless of weather or not the user knows it. MSN Messenger uses (or at least used to use last i checked) MD5 to authenticate with the passport system before logging onto servers. SSL secures our credit card transactions online, and DES keeps linux passwords safe just as NTLM tries to do with windows passwords.



posted on Jan, 28 2004 @ 10:16 PM
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The bottom line is that any encryption is breakable, it only takes time to brute force it. I'm sure NSA is attempting to crack al-queda's (and other terrorist groups) encryption, if they haven't already. The question is if they use a one time pad-type system like KGB used (No idea if SVR uses them, but I'd assume they do) where each message uses a different encryption key and is decoded by matching CDs/Books with the keys in them.

If not, all they would have to do is break the encryption once and would be able to read all the messages, but if so... they'd have to brute force every single message. Which would suck.



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