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What is the speed we are actually moving with ??

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posted on Jun, 28 2007 @ 10:52 PM
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I have to ask this question.
It is based on the asssumption that "the Big Bang " occcured and now all the Galaxies and star systems are moving (expanding) including our galaxy and solar system.
Is it possible that the cumulated speeds of this expansion plus the speed our galaxy is rotating (we are close to the edge of it so the speed should be considerable) can be measured and if so what it is the speed I am travelling through the universe while I am writing this questions?
Thank you in advance to anybody trying to answer.This question is going around in my mind since I was a teenager...
DeAdrian




posted on Jun, 28 2007 @ 11:09 PM
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That's a really good question, deadrianf. One that I've wondered about many times myself. The problem, to me anyways, is that measuring the speed would have to be in relation to a single stationary point in the universe, which I doubt exists. The universe itself may be in motion as well, in comparison to the possible multiverse.

The mind reels on the questions which it presents, but there are some great minds here...

I've flagged your thread so that it will be easier for me to find again.

The Space Exploration forum might actually be a better place to ask this, but it does fit here as well.




posted on Jun, 28 2007 @ 11:20 PM
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HI Masqua and thanks for the quick reply .
I thought too about the Stationary point in the universe and I believe that if you can track the directions (trajectories) the different galaxies are moving over a period of time say 1 year after that you should be able to backtrack the original point of the Big Bang aka the stationary point we are talkink about.But I might be wrong as I am not an expert in this matter I just had so many years to think about this

DeAdrianF



posted on Jun, 28 2007 @ 11:21 PM
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Seems like a good answer:



The sun circles the Milky Way at a speed of about 486,000 miles per hour. And every object in the universe is moving apart from the other objects as the universe expands at a constantly accelerating rate.

www.chron.com...


Beyond the center of our galaxy, there is no meaningful point to measure our speed against.


MBF

posted on Jun, 28 2007 @ 11:37 PM
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Maybe this from Wikipedia will help explain a little more in depth.




Velocity

In the general sense, the absolute velocity of any object through space is not a meaningful question according to Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity, which declares that there is no "preferred" inertial frame of reference in space with which to compare the galaxy's motion. (Motion must always be specified with respect to another object.)

With this in mind, many astronomers believe the galaxy is moving through space at approximately 600km per second relative to the observed locations of other nearby galaxies. Most recent estimates range from 130 km/s to 1,000 km/s. If indeed the Milky Way is moving at 600 km per second, we are traveling 51.84 million km per day, or more than 18.9 billion km per year. For comparison, this would mean that each year, we are traveling about 4.5 times the distance that Pluto lies from the Earth (at its closest). The Milky Way is thought to be moving in the direction of the constellation Hydra, and may someday become a close-knit member of the Virgo cluster of galaxies.

Another reference frame is provided by the Cosmic microwave background (CMB). The Milky Way is moving at around 552 km/s[30] with respect to the photons of the CMB. This can be observed by satellites such as COBE and WMAP as a dipole contribution to the CMB, as photons in equilibrium at the CMB frame get blue-shifted in the direction of the motion and red-shifted in the opposite direction.



posted on Jun, 29 2007 @ 02:21 AM
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They say are universe is expanding at an accelerating rate...

what happens when the rate of acceleration reaches lightspeed?



posted on Jun, 29 2007 @ 04:59 AM
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Originally posted by Eonnn
They say are universe is expanding at an accelerating rate...

what happens when the rate of acceleration reaches lightspeed?



Yeah, I have wondered that as well


As regards the OP, though this is not directly in relation to your question....you should also remember that the earth is travelling through the solar system at many thousands of miles per hour, as it circles the sun, and also, the earth itself is rotating, at between 600mph to 1000 mph, depending on whether you are at the equator or not.....


Interesting, isn't it?



We are never still!!



posted on Jun, 29 2007 @ 07:08 AM
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Originally posted by djohnsto77
Seems like a good answer:



The sun circles the Milky Way at a speed of about 486,000 miles per hour.

www.chron.com...





so, if one were to ever fall into a 'wormhole'...
they would only travel as fast as the absence/negation of the relative speed of this Galaxy, or 486,000 mph.
and even that speed is pathetically slow,
i.e., it would take ~ 1/2 hour to travel to the moon- - If one were able to insert a life support vehicle into a 'wormhole'.
ala' the 'Contact' movie scene



posted on Jun, 29 2007 @ 08:11 AM
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Originally posted by Eonnn
They say are universe is expanding at an accelerating rate...

what happens when the rate of acceleration reaches lightspeed?


The answer is actually quite simple
: An object, which moves away from us at more than light speed cannot be seen by us.

The further away an object is, the faster it is moving away from us (because the space between the object and us expands). The distance at which which this speed[*] reaches light speed is called our "horizon" - we cannot observe anything which is beyond this horizon. And because the expansion of the universe is accelerating, objects which are now inside the horizon will eventually be outside it.

[*]The objects don't travel through space at light speed (or above). Space itself expands, so no violation of the Theory of Relativity is necessary.


Now for the scary part
...

If the the acceleration of the expansion is big enough, then one (distant) day, the structure of space-time itself might eventually be ripped apart:

en.wikipedia.org...

However, whether the accelerated expansion is actually that strong is completely unknown today.

Regards
yf



posted on Jun, 29 2007 @ 08:48 AM
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I can thoroughly recommend this book , it gives a good background to the question you ask. There is no 'real' central point to the universe to trace back to. The Big Bang was a singularity, which means there would be no space or time to mark the beginning from.



posted on Jun, 30 2007 @ 10:56 PM
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Originally posted by St Udio

Originally posted by djohnsto77
Seems like a good answer:



The sun circles the Milky Way at a speed of about 486,000 miles per hour.

www.chron.com...





so, if one were to ever fall into a 'wormhole'...
they would only travel as fast as the absence/negation of the relative speed of this Galaxy, or 486,000 mph.
and even that speed is pathetically slow,
i.e., it would take ~ 1/2 hour to travel to the moon- - If one were able to insert a life support vehicle into a 'wormhole'.
ala' the 'Contact' movie scene



[edit on 30-6-2007 by deadrianf]

[edit on 30-6-2007 by deadrianf]



posted on Jun, 30 2007 @ 11:19 PM
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This is slightly related to this topic, but it's something I've always wondered.

What happens if two people are facing each other, but moving in opposite directions at a speed of half c? You're not approaching light speed, so your mass is still finite, but the relative speed of the other person is the speed of light.

(Assume, obviously, that such perception is still possible at all.)



posted on Jun, 30 2007 @ 11:34 PM
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HI
Actually I think Carl Sagan nailed it in the movie "Contact".
Given that we are moving at such speed one will need a negative acceleration vehicle to travel through space .It's like jumping from a bus at full speed once you hit the road you will feel the decceleration effects (not so pleasant to hit the asphalt at high speed... it's just a comparison).
So what would be the force which help achieve the independence from the actual movement we are experiencing? Is it antigravity ...or some kind of negative inertia ...or ???
DeAdrianF

P.S. - sorry about the above post .I was trying to answer the same post as here but I pressed the "quote " button.Still new here:-)



posted on Jul, 2 2007 @ 12:46 PM
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The galaxies aren't moving by themselves, it's space itself that is expanding. So technically there is not point we can use to measure our speed.



posted on Jul, 2 2007 @ 02:39 PM
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everything works in perfect symmetry. just because u know about how fast our galaxy moves doenst mean there isnt an oppposite. an even force.
is the universe a sphere? only logically.there for everything should not matter but work out fine.
by the way welcome to the machine



posted on Jul, 2 2007 @ 03:00 PM
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But this has all changed from the discover a few weeks ago, that our solar system is not actually part of the milkyway but of another one which is merging with the milky way. So are 'we' going faster or slower due to this combination of two galaxies merging?



posted on Jul, 2 2007 @ 09:33 PM
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Well if you consider that the electrons in your atoms are whizzing around at the speed of light, then technically we are moving at the speed of light.
Actually movement doesn't exsist, only reconstruction. like the frames of a film.
If you added the speed of the spin of the earth to the speed of spin of the solar system to the spin of the galaxy etc..
Add to the spin of the universe, yes I know Einsteins universe is considered static, absolutely everything spins why not the universe? Then eventually we would be moving at the speed of light.



posted on Jul, 4 2007 @ 07:38 AM
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Are we actually moving slower in time because of our galaxies movement through the universe ? I wonder what the top speed is, I mean is there a point in time when the earth is rotating and orbiting the sun in the same direction in which the galaxy is moving. I know from astronomy class that we are already moving at 100+ km per hour around the sun.

makes me really curious about the affects on time and the movement of our galaxy. Do we need to change speeds to have time ?, the way a magnetic field must change in a coil to cause current to flow ?, are they related ?



posted on Jul, 4 2007 @ 08:36 AM
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Originally posted by R3KR
Are we actually moving slower in time because of our galaxies movement through the universe ?


The galaxies are not moving through space, it's space that's expanding.



posted on Jul, 4 2007 @ 09:10 AM
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I guess my question is: The galaxies are "surfing" on the space that is moving but they are not actually moving ?



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