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Laser-Guided Bullets: Pentagon Pursuit

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posted on Jun, 27 2007 @ 03:09 PM
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From "Wired.com" :
American soldiers have been using laser scopes for a long time, to make their shots more accurate. But what if the bullets were actually steered by lasers, and able to turn on a dime. That's the idea behind a new, $7.5 million Darpa initiative to be a "laser-guided bullet."


Full Wired Article Here

Whatever next!

Well they've already got next-gen scopes.

Sounds like something from a old cartoon, bullets that can follow targets.

Yet another way to spend American Taxpayers Dollars on ways to control the population.


If this goes anywhere, it's scary stuff.

I wonder how "smart" a bullet like this could get?

[edit on 27/6/2007 by nerbot]




posted on Jun, 27 2007 @ 03:30 PM
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is this even possible
shooting a projectile at that speed and not destroying any sort of guidence system that you can fit in a tiny slug?

this is just a waste of time



posted on Jun, 27 2007 @ 03:47 PM
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bodrul -

The US army already puts guidance systems in artillery shells and fires them at 8,000Gs.

This type of bullet is probably more suitable for high caliber sniper rifles like the M107 .50 cal. Guidance systems CAN get that small and CAN actually be quite a bit more deadly when all of the internal components fragment inside the body.



posted on Jun, 27 2007 @ 03:55 PM
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Sounds expensive, even if we want to reduce collateral damage. I don't think its worth the effort.



posted on Jun, 27 2007 @ 04:18 PM
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BlackWidow23 i stand corrected

i know about the artlirey shells and the guidence system
just the thought of smart bullets boggles my mind



posted on Jun, 27 2007 @ 04:22 PM
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Why, so scared soldiers can empty a magazine, and waste 3000 dollars in a single spray.

The only application I can see for this, is for assassaination. If your target is way over there, there, there is now no need for complicated wind adjustments, or complex math.



posted on Jun, 27 2007 @ 05:31 PM
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As a professional engineer I believe this idea is completely plausible; however, the bullets would be expensive and only suitable for long distance shots (sniper?) because of the velocities involved. Basically, the speed of the bullet is so great, it appears to hit its target almost instantaneously. Where is the opportunity to steer the bullet?
I can understand the artillery shells because they travel far enough that there is a noticeable travel time to steer the projectile. So other than sniper bullets what is the point of this?



posted on Jun, 27 2007 @ 05:51 PM
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The first method (to grossly, grossly oversimplify), is to shoot out a series of thousands of laser pulses, creating a "profile" of the "eddies" in the local atmosphere as the light bounces back. The second involves using use a high-speed camera to take an image of the target. The eddies distort the phase of the light in that picture. The scope, through a series of algorithms, can take those into account for the sniper team.
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Is not the point that all the math is figured out BEFORE the hammer even hits the pin?

Or have I missed he point?



posted on Jun, 27 2007 @ 06:13 PM
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Yeah, the idea of trying to create a bullet that actually goes round corners is a waste of time and money. It's far more efficient putting the R&D into the "scope". (Not that I agree with any advantage to being able to kill a victim).

Bullets can only be used once and ones with a guidance system would cost big bucks. A scope is re-usable and the idea of a bullet being able to change course in such a miniscule time is rediculous really.

Yup, waste of U.S. money.



posted on Jun, 27 2007 @ 06:50 PM
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Here's an article from a year ago about a related technology.

gtresearchnews.gatech.edu...

I agree that you're not likely to see this in sidearms or in 5.56mm or 7.62mm.

If it makes it's way into small arms, the .50 cal or even 40mm would most likely, in my humble opinion.


[edit on 2007/6/27 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Jun, 27 2007 @ 07:36 PM
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I still can't understand how it would be possible to "steer" a projectile moving at such high speeds and rotating too.

Do the "jets" pulse with the rotation to provide movement in the needed direction? E.g: up, down, left or right.

It's all beyond me! Why, why, why.
Money, money, money.



posted on Jun, 27 2007 @ 08:15 PM
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Why waste money on making a bullet steered by light when you can spend the same amount of money training the soldier to fire it correctly?
Last time I checked most troopers dont break down as easily as a laser.....



posted on Jun, 27 2007 @ 09:08 PM
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Originally posted by devilwasp
Why waste money on making a bullet steered by light when you can spend the same amount of money training the soldier to fire it correctly?


I'm with you there, but I think that's a firepower versus well-placed shot argument.

I'm pretty sure that the idea here is to extend the capacity beyond what is now humanly possible and I"m betting against it beoming a reality.

The efforts will most likely show up in grenade launchers and artillery.

[edit on 2007/6/27 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Jun, 27 2007 @ 09:38 PM
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I think they should nick name these bullets "Regime Changers". Lol. Imagine Hitler up in front of the masses giving a morale raising speech only to have the back of his head explode mid-sentance. That would be great for morale!



posted on Jun, 27 2007 @ 09:45 PM
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Originally posted by orthisguyoverhere
Imagine Hitler up in front of the masses giving a morale raising speech only to have the back of his head explode mid-sentance.


I think that's exactly the point.



posted on Jun, 28 2007 @ 12:43 PM
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Originally posted by bodrul
is this even possible
shooting a projectile at that speed and not destroying any sort of guidence system that you can fit in a tiny slug?

this is just a waste of time


Ever hear of the Excalibur round for artillery. Same tech different package. nanotech/Micro electronics make it possible.

The article also mentions its use with sniper rifles, not any and every gun.

[edit on 28-6-2007 by American Madman]



posted on Jun, 28 2007 @ 10:33 PM
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They got a patent for it link

So I suppose that means there is a working example somewhere



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