Sasquatch carcass

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posted on Jun, 10 2007 @ 08:43 PM
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Been through some back areas of Arkansas, Mr. Wumpy. One time I had to drive the semi on some backwoods state highway, (SR 59 if memory serves) from Siloam Springs up to Missouri. Solid rock cliff overhangs that I was scared that the rig would not fit under. Being late at night did not help that fear any. Really wished I went back through Tontitown and caught I-540/US 71.

I didn't see anything but I can assure the rest of the readers that there are parts of Arkansas that are as remote as the Moon of Endor in Return of the Jedi.




posted on Jun, 10 2007 @ 09:35 PM
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I am a deer and duck hunter. I have been in the deep woods many times, and I have never seen any deer bones or any bear bones. I guess thats proof that these animals don't exist.
I agree,I also spend a lot of time in the mountains(Appalachians)And don't find carcasses.It is possible that Bigfoot is intelligent enough to carry or even bury their dead.



posted on Jun, 10 2007 @ 09:45 PM
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mrwupy,

Our organization, the Texas Bigfoot Research Conservancy, investigates reports of Bigfoot sightings in Arkansas.

Would you be interested in submitting a report regarding your encounter? If so, you can submit the report through our report submission form.

Sincerely, Craig Woolheater
Texas Bigfoot Research Conservancy



posted on Jun, 10 2007 @ 09:54 PM
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I've already submitted a report to bfro, but I'd be happy to send you a report as well. I'll send it along tomorrow night since I'm heading off to bed right now.

Night folks,

wupy



posted on Jun, 10 2007 @ 10:08 PM
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Don't carcasses normally get eaten by other animals such as badgers, bears, wolves, vultures, buzzards, ants, maggots, etc? That would probably explain why no one's ever seen a sasquatch carcass. They're exceptionally rare (and arguably nonexistent) and will probably be eaten by scavengers before discovered, so the chance of finding a sasquatch carcass is slim to none.



posted on Jun, 10 2007 @ 11:12 PM
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Bones tend to be taken by coyotes, wolves and other wild dogs. They are burried, eaten and ect. In British Columbia we have the odd sighting. I live out in the booneys near a small town, and i remeber when i was 14 juring the summer, i was sitting outside stackin lumber wood for my dad. I noticed my dog acting kind of weird and its tail was between its legs, then i got a wiff the most unbareable smell ever. I cant even explain how it smelt. It was musky and it almost smelt rotten, or unclean. I never saw it, but i knew that it was that because of the stories that i heard from locals.



posted on Jun, 10 2007 @ 11:24 PM
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Originally posted by Paresthesia
Don't carcasses normally get eaten by other animals such as badgers, bears, wolves, vultures, buzzards, ants, maggots, etc? That would probably explain why no one's ever seen a sasquatch carcass. They're exceptionally rare (and arguably nonexistent) and will probably be eaten by scavengers before discovered, so the chance of finding a sasquatch carcass is slim to none.


Thank you Paresthesia for having some sense. Dead things don't survive long in the wild. They are usually devoured within days of their death. Hell, if we didn't bury our dead in lock boxes and stone shelters we would be gone in short order too.



posted on Jun, 11 2007 @ 12:50 AM
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Originally posted by Rasobasi420

Originally posted by Paresthesia
Don't carcasses normally get eaten by other animals such as badgers, bears, wolves, vultures, buzzards, ants, maggots, etc? That would probably explain why no one's ever seen a sasquatch carcass. They're exceptionally rare (and arguably nonexistent) and will probably be eaten by scavengers before discovered, so the chance of finding a sasquatch carcass is slim to none.


Thank you Paresthesia for having some sense. Dead things don't survive long in the wild. They are usually devoured within days of their death. Hell, if we didn't bury our dead in lock boxes and stone shelters we would be gone in short order too.


Bones really don't hold up well in wet climates, such as the Pacific Northwest. When visiting my Grandpa's farm in the mountains in Montana, I would find some antlers or maybe a piece of a skull once in a while near the creek. Otherwise, bones will actually disintegrate and wash away. Most bones and pretty much all fossils are found in much drier climates.

The biggest argument against Bigfoot is that there has to be a relatively large breeding population around or they wouldn't be able to keep the species going. Unless everybody is spotting "The Last Bigfoot." Otherwise, there needs to be a couple dozen of those things running around in relative close proximity, or they'll die out. And the more there are, the more likely they'll be spotted. They don't seem to have any natural predators, so there's no reason a larger population couldn't develop.



posted on Jun, 11 2007 @ 12:53 AM
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I've always wondered why we can find such large animals as mammoths, north american lions, short faced cave bears, and not a sasquatch. I know gigantopithecus existed in Asia supposedly a million years ago, so if it did migrate to North America it would seem it would have to fight off some large creatures for food and not always win those battles. Yet no bones.

Despite that though I still think something is out there, a migrating gigantopithecus "fits' in with the other creatures...and if it is intelligent and reclusive then it has a better chance to exist today than any other animal. I'm still amazed that there were other human like creatures on this planet like neanderthals and people seem to blow it off. So another intelligent creature like a sasquatch is not far fetched.



posted on Jun, 11 2007 @ 01:58 AM
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I live in South Africa, and I can't even begin to tell you how much time I've spend walking around in the Bushveld. I've seen plenty of animal carcasses like Impala, Warthog, Jackal, and so. I have however never seen a live Aardvark. Nor the carcass of an aardvark. Does that mean that they don't exist? No. The same goes for the African Honey Badger. In all the weeks, months and years I've spent in the bushveld I've never seen one of these shy little guys. Nor a carcass. That doesn't mean that they don't exist.

Let's look at some numbers...
In 2005 scientists found dozens of new animal and insect species in New Guinea. Live animals, not dead animals. Source
In 2006 scientists discovered more than 100 new species in the Hawaiian Islands. Live animals, not dead ones. Source
In 2006 2 new species of animals was found in the Philippines. Live animals, not dead ones. Source
In 2006 52 new species was discovered on Borneo. 400 hundred species since 1996.
Source
In 2005 Scientists discovered a new species of monkey in East Africa. Live animals, again. Source
In 2006 8 new live species were discovered in Israel. Source
In 2002 they rediscovered the Ivory-Billed Woodpecker in Arkansas, USA after they thought it extinct for over 10 years (with no confirmed sightings for nearly 60 years.) No carcasses were found for 60 years - and still aren’t found.
Source
I can go on and on like this. As you can see the past 2 years (or so) hundreds of new species was discovered. No one found a "body" to give a slight indication that the animal existed. The breakthrough was live animals.

Look at the Big Cat(s) roaming around in Britain. Only one skull has been found (in 2005, the first believed "real evidence") which could belong to the elusive black "panther-like" cat prancing around the place. (It's difficult to be sure about the origin of a feline skull, seeing that large cats lived on the Islands up 1500 years ago, and hundreds of cats escaped circuses, zoos and illegal owners in the past 40+ years.) Several other larger cats have been killed over the past few years, but the majority of them have been traced back to their human owners. All that said, the British isles are a lot smaller than the USA, with a higher population per area.

The area of uninhabited natural forest in the USA is vast, more than enough space to sustain any "undiscovered species" such as a large primate or humanoid sub-species, better known in the public tongue as Bigfoot.

In conclusion, hoping to find a "body" (or rather carcass) of an animal to proof that the species exists is a fool’s game. Every new species that is discovered reminds us that we do not yet know everything, nor know all animals – and every such discovery is supported by a live animal, not a carcass.

The chances of coming across a live Bigfoot/Sasquatch are very slim. Are the chances of bumping into a Bigfoot carcass bigger? Would you know a Bigfoot carcass if you see one?



posted on Jun, 11 2007 @ 09:11 AM
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Just for informations sake, I'll throw this into the pile. There have been several reported sightings of 'Bigfoot' in Southeastern Oklahoma not long ago. Most have taken place in and around a small town named Honobia (pronounced ho-nub-e), in extreme Northeastern Pushmataha County.

While I"m at it I'll give a bit of description about the area. If you look on a map, you'll find a very odd and relatively unknown part of Southeastern Oklahoma, complete with strange tales and a strange history. The area is the northern half of McCurtain County, the Eastern one third of Pushmataha County, and the Southern half of Le Flore County. The 'rough' area also extends a few miles into Western Arkansas. This area is generally refered to as the Quachita (pronounced wa-she-ta, accent on the first syllable) Mountains.

There are two designated "Wilderness Area" here, ravines and hills all over, plenty of running water, and forests so thick you can scarce get through the tangle in places. Except for the towns, only a few of which even break the 1000 mark for number of souls, this is VERY sparsely populated country.

A great part of Northern McCurtain County is timber reserves owned by large paper companies, likely in excess of a ten million acres. I know this sounds like a lot of land, but this is an area that is almost as unsettled as it was in the 1800s.

All told, in these three counties and bits of others, and over into Western Arkansas, there is at least an area of a hundred and fifty square miles that has no real obstruction to the free roaming of even a small group of creatures. The greater portion of this area in Le Flore County is National Forest land, mostly the Quachita National Forest.

This area has a slightly odd history as well. The Natives did not live in the mountains proper when first contacted by the outside world. They would hunt in the area, and lived mostly on the fringes, as this part of the country had a slightly 'bad' feel to it. Naturally, pressed by white settlements, the Native population eventually had to move deeper into the rougher areas, but it has always maintained a slightly 'haunted' feel in their minds.

The central part of Le Flore County has another unusual feature, on the order of the 'Lost Ronoke Colony' story. Sitting on Poteau (pronounced Po-toe, accent on the first syllable) Mountain, near the town of Heavener (pronounced heave-ner, accent on the first syllable) is a stone monolith said to be the marker of a wandering group of Vikings from well before the time of C. Columbus. The markings are in the Scandinavian Runic text, and have been translated a couple of ways, either as a date, or as a boundary marker. No one has any clue what happened to these people.

(Those so inclined can google a lady, now deceased, named Gloria Farley, who did extensive research on this.)

Just a bit of lore here for those who wonder how a group of creatures could have a range big enough to remain in, right in the middle of the United States.

Happy hunting.



posted on Jun, 11 2007 @ 11:40 AM
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Junglelord thanks for those recordings. I found it VERY interesting that they do sound as though they are coming from similar creatures, although with individual variances in the calls. Sort of how all dog barks sound the same, but each dog barks in a different way.
Clearly evidence the same creature was being recorded.

And on topic. No carcass doesn't mean non-existent. I have NEVER seen a whale carcass, so do they not exist? In my city there's a huge forest literally bursting with deer. Seriously, they are there all year round, from calf to corpse... yet those corpses are never seen. Ask anyone who works there and they'll say you get a corpse every now and then, but the majority of them are never found. No matter where you go, you hardly ever see animal corpses. Perhaps you'll see one or two, but never loads.

And whose to say Bigfoots (bigfeet?) don't bury their dead? They are theoretically bipedal primates, and most bipedal primates that evolved on this planet had had some form of 'ancestor worship' (the burying and mourning of the dead).



posted on Jun, 11 2007 @ 11:42 AM
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*double post because the edit button vanished*

The first one is pretty damned creepy! I listened bottom up and that one made me jump, then scared.



posted on Jun, 11 2007 @ 12:04 PM
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Originally posted by Gemwolf
The chances of coming across a live Bigfoot/Sasquatch are very slim. Are the chances of bumping into a Bigfoot carcass bigger? Would you know a Bigfoot carcass if you see one?


I bet you could smell it. From what I understand those Bigfoots (Bigfeet?) don't smell all that good when they're alive, so I imagine a dead Bigfoot would stink to high Heaven. That being said, it sure would make sense for Bigfoot hunters to bring along a few good hunting dogs to track them down. Give them a good sniff inside one of those footprints, and they ought to be able to track down one of those critters.



posted on Jun, 11 2007 @ 12:14 PM
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Originally posted by Where2Hide2006
I am a deer and duck hunter. I have been in the deep woods many times, and I have never seen any deer bones or any bear bones. I guess thats proof that these animals don't exist.



The only deer and/or bear carcass I have ever seen was a pile of hair. Usually that hair is picked up by birds (to line their nests with) in a few hours. Nature is pretty good at disposing of it's dead.



posted on Jun, 11 2007 @ 03:43 PM
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When I was about ten we had 20 acres of land in Elk, WA and we came across some footprints that were way to big to be a humans foot print. The night before we found the foot prints we smelled a musky smell like garbage that floated pass the house and all the dogs were on edge....



posted on Jun, 11 2007 @ 05:16 PM
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All living creatures must have these ( especially a big animal so called sasquatch ):

- Belongings, hair, bones.
- Food and drink, what do they eat? where do they get the food from? Is there any left over food.
You can find many left over fruit eaten by apes and monkeys, you can see their bites marks on left over apples and so on.
- Faeces and urines, what they eat and drink must come out. And wastes from living beings normally smells.
- Foot tracks, foot prints. They must move around to eat and #, to mate and to grow up their babies.
- Territory, do you think an animal with such big size sasquatch is living within an area of 1 km square? They live so deep in the jungle so not many people can see them?
- Behaviour, do they live alone or in group? People normally claimed seeing sasquatch alone.
No matter how lonely he/she, it needs to mate to produce offspring. How this lonely animal attracting opposite sex to mate? By jumping around, shouting around? making funny noises? Spreading smell?
- Don't they have any diseases? All of them die peacefully in the hidden places? None of them get sudden death in the middle of jungle where people passing through? Do they fight each other and kill each other? They buried the corpse of their enemies so none of you can find it?
- Do they have natural enemies who hunt them down? Or do they hunt? What they hunt? No traces of huntings?
- and more more more if you'd think of, if you'd dare to think of!


I am starting getting sick of people claiming seeing sasquatch here and there everyday, in Texas, in California. I am not surprised one day one of you claiming seeing sasquatch in the middle of New York.
JUST WHAT DO YOU GET FROM CLAIMING SEEING Sasquatch? You get money fame from that? You get lovers?

It is a typical joke of Americans who never grow up, a disgrace to American.



posted on Jun, 11 2007 @ 07:20 PM
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Originally posted by CinLung-Part-1

JUST WHAT DO YOU GET FROM CLAIMING SEEING Sasquatch? You get money fame from that? You get lovers?


I've never gotten a thing from telling the story of the night I saw a Bigfoot with my own eyes. I've never asked for anything and never will.

I don't even ask for anyone to believe me. I don't care if anyone believes me. I know what I saw one night in the woods of Arkansas, a Bigfoot.

If you don't believe me, hell if no one ever believes me, I'll still tell the story cause it's true.



posted on Jun, 11 2007 @ 07:33 PM
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Originally posted by CinLung-Part-1
It is a typical joke of Americans who never grow up, a disgrace to American.


And what about the sightings of seven foot tall hairy men in Britain? Or the Australian Yowie? Or the Himalayan Yeti? The Mongolian Almas? The Asian Barmanou (a man investigating this creature extensively was murdered and his killer never captured)? The Indonesian Ebu Gogo? The Scottish Greyman? The British Woodwoses? The Japanese Hibagon? The Filipino Kapre? The Vietnamese Nguoi Rung? The Sumatran Orang Pendek? The Malaysian Orang Mawas? The Chinese Yeren?

You see? America isn't the centre of all things with Bigfeet. There are reports of similar creatures all across the world... literally!

I leave you with a quote from the Norwegian Konungs skuggsjá written around 1250...




"It once happened in that country (and this seems indeed strange) that a living creature was caught in the forest as to which no one could say definitely whether it was a man or some other animal; for no one could get a word from it or be sure that it understood human speech. It had the human shape, however, in every detail, both as to hands and face and feet; but the entire body was covered with hair as the beasts are, and down the back it had a long coarse mane like that of a horse, which fell to both sides and trailed along the ground when the creature stooped in walking."



posted on Jun, 11 2007 @ 08:30 PM
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Originally posted by enjoies05
It does seem pretty suprising at first that if Sasquatch exists we haven't found a carcass.

But then again how many people do you know that go into the deeps of the wilderness and look for them?

Could somebody found what was a carcass of a Sasquatch and just thought it was a different animal? They could be mistaken for a bear or another large animal.


That's true. Plus - it shouldn't be forgotten that dead bodies in very remote regions usually become scavenged & scattered across a wide area in a matter of days.

Vast areas of Westeren Canada and Alaska are rarely, if ever, visited by humans that frequently. British Columbia (my home) for instance, is bigger than California, Oregon & Washington state combined - yet has a population probably smaller than greater L.A. So most of it IS wilderness (thank god). Plenty of room for a few dozen Sasquatch bodies to go undiscovered for many years, if not forever.

Then there is the remote posibility that the Sasquatch MAY bury it's dead. There IS some evidence for this already in Alaska.

Jimbo999






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