A Breathable Mars

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posted on Jun, 4 2007 @ 08:43 PM
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I recently recieved a cassette of an ex Navy Seal specialized in Compression and UFO's. I believe his name is Cooper. He was giving a seminar on his findings that he had been working on for 17 years and just revealed at that moment. One of his subjects was about space exploration and what the government is hiding from us. He stated that after two decompressions to thinner air the little amount of oxygen in Mar's atmosphere is breathable without aid, he also stated it HAS BEEN DONE.

Also, he said that the moon wobbles a little bit on its revolution around the earth, and that region gets day and nights much like our world, and plants are able to sustain living there, with the aid of humans I would think. Also there is a base on the dark side of the moon which is completely hidden as the opposite side of the moon is unviewable from our planet.

Any thoughts, input, or arguements would be greatly appreciated, thank you for reading.




posted on Jun, 4 2007 @ 08:56 PM
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It's hard to argue this without any data to back up your friends claims. As it stands they are just statements.

On the planet Venus my nose is so large I can use it for a tent. I offer nothing to prove this, so arguing the matter is a bit silly.

What evidence can your friend share with the board so a rational discussion can follow?



posted on Jun, 4 2007 @ 10:22 PM
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Originally posted by ingeniouslycorrupt
I recently recieved a cassette of an ex Navy Seal specialized in Compression and UFO's. I believe his name is Cooper. He was giving a seminar on his findings...


Navy Seal specialized in Compression and UFO's?

...

Yeah ok so you decompress twice and you can safely walk around in a athmosphere that is 1000 times thinner than ours? wow thats amazing.

observe.arc.nasa.gov...

So I guess all the data on the athmosphere is total bogus as you clearly cant survive with that little oxygen? Would there possibly be some kind of data or estimation of the "real" composition of the athmosphere if he has done these studies for 17 years? Would be nice to know whats it really made of.

[edit on 4-6-2007 by Gonjo]



posted on Jun, 4 2007 @ 10:31 PM
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He specialized in deep sea diving/air pressure. But the later part of his life, last 17 years he studied solely UFO's.

How do we know the atmosphere is that thin though? The info we get are through text books the government edits. Slightly biased I'd say.



posted on Jun, 4 2007 @ 10:34 PM
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Originally posted by ingeniouslycorrupt
How do we know the atmosphere is that thin though? The info we get are through text books the government edits. Slightly biased I'd say.


The government are not the only ones who can verify that the Moon has no atmosphere and that Mars atmosphere is not capable of supporting any macroscopic Terran life, most especially humans.



posted on Jun, 4 2007 @ 10:39 PM
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How many independant researches have been done on mars not funded by the government?



posted on Jun, 4 2007 @ 10:45 PM
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Originally posted by ingeniouslycorrupt
How many independant researches have been done on mars not funded by the government?


That depends, what exactly do you mean.

Anyone with the right telescope and knowledge of astrophysics and such can see that
Mars does not have enough atmosphere or even the right chemical make-up to support Terran life.



posted on Jun, 4 2007 @ 10:49 PM
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Really, I'm just curious, from lack of knowledge. How can you, with a telescope measure the oxygen content of an atmosphere. I've looked at mars through a telescope, it was tough to see the polar caps let alone the atmosphere.



posted on Jun, 4 2007 @ 10:52 PM
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Originally posted by ingeniouslycorrupt
Really, I'm just curious, from lack of knowledge. How can you, with a telescope measure the oxygen content of an atmosphere. I've looked at mars through a telescope, it was tough to see the polar caps let alone the atmosphere.


Through spectroscopic analyses of the chemical composition of the atmosphere.



posted on Jun, 4 2007 @ 11:03 PM
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Originally posted by ingeniouslycorrupt
He specialized in deep sea diving/air pressure. But the later part of his life, last 17 years he studied solely UFO's.

How do we know the atmosphere is that thin though? The info we get are through text books the government edits. Slightly biased I'd say.


Yeah ok so the data is bogus, then could you perhaps provide the rest of us with the real data which you apparently have somewhere I assume if you are telling us its breathable after decompression. I mean theres a long way to 20% oxygen which is made by plants down here on planet earth. Now dont get me wrong I do believe theres some sort of life,water maybe plants? down there but to say there breathable athmosphere would basicly mean that...

- Mars has to have very active and working magnetic field to prevent solar winds from destroying the athmosphere

- Mars is alot warmer that we are being told or theres alot of life just under the surface that is bringing alot of oxygen into the athmosphere

- Mars actually has alot thicker athmosphere that we are being told because as it is now no matter how many times you decompress there is no way you can survive down there without atleast a pressure suit. I mean the the pressure we are being told is so low that we would pop like the deep sea creatures do once brought to land.

Now dont get me wrong I do believe theres still more to mars than we are being told but without _any_ data I will have to take the "Your source is full of it." route. Sorry.



posted on Jun, 4 2007 @ 11:19 PM
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Really, a SEAL Operator specializing in UFO's, thats amazing! Especially with the fact that I was in the Special Warfare community for many years as well, meaning that I am a former SEAL and I never heard a drop of information at the least saying any SPECWAR members studies unidentified flying objects. That information is most certainly FALSE! *throws the BS flag*



posted on Jun, 4 2007 @ 11:32 PM
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Point taken, the source sounds quite illegitimate. I really wish there was some way to post an audio feed on here, so you could here the recording. The moment i get it up i will let you know.

There are plenty of microorganisms that can survive extremely harsh conditions.



posted on Jun, 5 2007 @ 12:10 AM
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It's bogus.

The atmosphere on Mars is mostly carbon dioxide (and not directly breathable), far thinner than we'd encounter on Mt. Everest, cold enough to form dry ice (have you touched dry ice?), and with no protection from radiation.

There are two moons (not one) and they're tiny... no more than a few miles in diameter.

Like so many other "revelations" in the UFO field, this is just a hoaxer playing everyone for a fool.



posted on Jun, 5 2007 @ 12:13 AM
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Direct data from the Viking Landers on the atmosphere of Mars is here:
www.daviddarling.info...

It's consistant with spectrographic analysis.

It's 97% CO2, and less than 0.5% oxygen.



posted on Jun, 5 2007 @ 01:03 AM
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i would personally like to see this technique used here on earth. Why cant we try and let our mountain climbers work with the technology.



posted on Jun, 5 2007 @ 06:28 AM
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A breathable Mars is going to take decades, if not centuries, of terra forming. First we have to identify which plants will live on Mars, possibly there is plant life already there waiting for us to cultivate it (or maybe those plants, if any, are producing the CO2).

Then we grow the Mars into a big ol' garden. These things take time. We are really small compared to planets and such. I don't know what people are thinking when they imply we can simply send a rocket or touch a button and "Viola'" instant atmosphere!

Life on this planet is so vast and immense, we need to understand it a little better before going off and attempting to put oxygen on another. I know we're heading up the creek now with Earth population, "global warming" whatever that is, and polution, but we'll be in serious shinola if we decide to send any form of life whether its a type of Earth-Martian pine tree or a Navy Seal who can hold his breath every 20 minutes.

My point is, you get one chance here. Exploring Mars with people is okay. Moving in with all our stuff all at once because our body of science fiction tells us it might work out...not so much.



posted on Jun, 5 2007 @ 07:27 AM
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Originally posted by Here Now
i would personally like to see this technique used here on earth. Why cant we try and let our mountain climbers work with the technology.


They already do, and have for decades. But there's a certain limit -- we need quite a bit of oxygen and if it's not there, we can't survive. Mt. Everest is about the limits of how little oxygen we can take. Even those who live on the slopes of the mountain in relatively thin air have a hard time there.



posted on Jun, 5 2007 @ 09:01 AM
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------------------------------------------------------
A breathable Mars is going to take decades, if not centuries, of terra forming.
------------------------------------------------------

Dude,

Attempting to terraform Mars would not work, unless you could erect some sort of magnetic field around the whole planet. Otherwise, the High Energy particles spewing from the sun would just erode any atmosphere you were trying to create.

Planet – Magnetic Field = any appreciable Atmosphere is not possible.



posted on Jun, 5 2007 @ 09:33 AM
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Originally posted by iori_komei

Originally posted by ingeniouslycorrupt
How many independant researches have been done on mars not funded by the government?


That depends, what exactly do you mean.

Anyone with the right telescope and knowledge of astrophysics and such can see that
Mars does not have enough atmosphere or even the right chemical make-up to support Terran life.


How does a telescope tell you wheather or not an atmosphere is thick or not? Just because you have a telescope and you're aware of astrophysics (I won't say "specialized" because I'm guessing specialized astrophysicican are somehow related to the government) doesn't mean that you can tell wheather or not Mars is breathable without aid.

The only people who can tell are most likely not independant. And I don't think any casual space exploration instrument will be able to tell you anything about Mars besides it's appearance.

[edit on 5-6-2007 by ZikhaN]



posted on Jun, 5 2007 @ 09:43 AM
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Originally posted by ZikhaN
How does a telescope tell you wheather or not an atmosphere is thick or not? Just because you have a telescope and you're aware of astrophysics (I won't say "specialized" because I'm guessing specialized astrophysicican are somehow related to the government) ...


It is "astrophysicist", and you guessed wrong.



... doesn't mean that you can tell wheather or not Mars is breathable without aid.

The only people who can tell are most likely not independant. And I don't think any casual space exploration instrument will be able to tell you anything about Mars besides it's appearance.


You experience in astronomy is rather limited, isn't it
? E.g., did you ever hear about spectroscopy? It's a method to tell the composition and density of an atmosphere from a long way away. You definitely don't need government-sized budgets or government-furnished equipment to do this for planets in our solar system.

Regards
yf





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