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Time Travel using worm Holes

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posted on Jan, 4 2004 @ 02:03 AM
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It is said that you could travel through time using worm holes...kind of like an ant on a piece of paper...
Let me explain (if you don't understand go to www.h2g2.com which is where I found the explanation)...

We will think of wormholes as 2D for now for comprehensive reasons. An ant is crawling along a piece of paper. If a person bent the paper into the third dimension and put a straw through two hole of the paper, connecting the two sides, the ant would simply have to walk through the straw to reach the other side of the paper.

The ant could not have bent the paper into a wormhole, just like we can't bend time into a wormhole, so it is said that we have to work a dimension below the place we need to bend.

So is it therefore possible to travel through time by bending the thrid dimension into the fourth (time), creating a worm hole?

Thoughts?




posted on Jan, 4 2004 @ 02:09 AM
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I don't know if u can use wormholes in ways as in, The One, but I always had a different view on these. Those "Baby" Universes I was talkin about... I thought these could be the gateways to these Univeres, whether it is the Black hole itself that is the wormhole, or if the black hole continues to exist while a seperate inter-galactic "free-way" is created to enter these Universes. ( If my theories seem a little whack right now, It's late and I'm getting tired....)



posted on Jan, 4 2004 @ 02:16 AM
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It's possible, but the black holes would have to be engineered. At the bottom of the black hole is the 'singularity' which is usually 'the point of no return' and then everything which gets there is smashed to a pulp. However, if the singularity was ring-shaped then it might be possible to pass through without being pummeled to a molecular level by the amazing forces of gravity in a black hole.



posted on Jan, 4 2004 @ 02:18 AM
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Seems some to many have been watching too much 'Farscape'.......



regards
seekerof

[Edited on 4-1-2004 by Seekerof]



posted on Jan, 4 2004 @ 02:20 AM
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lol
I actually used to watch that...
But I think it's possible...kind of - you have to learn how to bend space itself and then bend it into a wormhole.



posted on Jan, 4 2004 @ 05:03 AM
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Originally posted by TheRenegade
It's possible, but the black holes would have to be engineered. At the bottom of the black hole is the 'singularity' which is usually 'the point of no return' and then everything which gets there is smashed to a pulp.


The point of no return is the event horizon. The point at which at best light can orbit but NOTHING, ever, no exceptions, can escape. This region is based on the total mass of the singularity.


Originally posted by TheRenegade
However, if the singularity was ring-shaped then it might be possible to pass through without being pummeled to a molecular level by the amazing forces of gravity in a black hole.


What? Huh? How can a SINGULARITY be anything shaped? Its a singularity. It has no width, depth, height, it is just a point in space. There is no shape of any kind possible if it is still a singularity.

Well before even the event horizon a human being would be torn to shreds anyways.


Also, in reguard to the whole thread, wormholes are unsuported theory with little backing even in just theory. They are a concept mostly employed in sci-fi.



posted on Jan, 4 2004 @ 05:12 AM
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Do we actually kow that wormholes exist or are they just theoretical at the moment....i only ask this because i remember everyone saying that blackholes could be used for travel but blackholes have mass (and a hell of a lot of it at that!) but have they actually proven the existence of wormholes yet?



posted on Jan, 4 2004 @ 05:14 AM
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Your theory's very close to what John Titor was talking about
Sam Neill in Event Horizon also gave a very similar theory, it seems to be a popular one.



posted on Jan, 4 2004 @ 09:00 AM
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Yeah...I think I heard the theory from John Titor - he was going on about microsingularities. The websites he linked to seemed to give some handy info though.



posted on Jan, 4 2004 @ 05:47 PM
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yes wormholes do exist, some scientist claimed to have succeded in makeing a nano wormhole for sending music or sound data back in time by laser beam (info was encoded on laser) this was few years back and i have not heard anything since.

[Edited on 4-1-2004 by blobby]



posted on Jan, 4 2004 @ 05:57 PM
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Found absolutely no information on nano's creating wormholes....may have been using the wrong 'key words'.....but I did find this two pretty informative articles on "Wormholes":

"TRAVERSABLE WORMHOLES: SOME IMPLICATIONS"
Link:
www.aleph.se...

"The Physics of Interstellar Travel"
Link:
www.mkaku.org...

Excerpt:

"The problems with wormholes are many":

a) one version requires enormous amounts of positive energy, e.g. a black hole. Positive energy wormholes have an event horizon(s) and hence only give us a one way trip. One would need two black holes (one for the original trip, and one for the return trip) to make interstellar travel practical. Most likely only a Type III civilization would be able harness this power.

b) wormholes may be unstable, both classically or quantum mechanically. They may close up as soon as you try to enter them. Or radiation effects may soar as you entered them, killing you.

c) one version requires vast amounts of negative energy. Negative energy does exist (in the form of the Casimir effect) but huge quantities of negative energy will be beyond our technology, perhaps for millennia. The advantage of negative energy wormholes is that they do not have event horizons and hence are more easily transversable.

d) another version requires large amounts of negative matter. Unfortunately, negative matter has never been seen in nature (it would fall up, rather than down). Any negative matter on the earth would have fallen up billions of years ago, making the earth devoid of any negative matter.

The second possibility is to use large amounts of energy to continuously stretch space and time (i.e. contracting the space in front of you, and expanding the space behind you). Since only empty space is contracting or expanding, one may exceed the speed of light in this fashion. (Empty space can warp space faster than light. For example, the Big Bang expanded much faster than the speed of light.) The problem with this approach, again, is that vast amounts of energy are required, making it feasible for only a Type III civilization. Energy scales for all these proposals are on the order of the Planck energy (10 to the 19 billion electron volts, which is a quadrillion times larger than our most powerful atom smasher).

Lastly, there is the fundamental physics problem of whether “topology change” is possible within General Relativity (which would also make possible time machines, or closed time-like curves). General Relativity allows for closed time-like curves and wormholes (often called Einstein-Rosen bridges), but it unfortunately breaks down at the large energies found at the center of black holes or the instant of Creation. For these extreme energy domains, quantum effects will dominate over classical gravitational effects, and one must go to a “unified field theory” of quantum gravity.

At present, the most promising (and only) candidate for a “theory of everything”, including quantum gravity, is superstring theory or M-theory. It is the only theory in which quantum forces may be combined with gravity to yield finite results. No other theory can make this claim. With only mild assumptions, one may show that the theory allows for quarks arranged in much like the configuration found in the current Standard Model of sub-atomic physics. Because the theory is defined in 10 or 11 dimensional hyperspace, it introduces a new cosmological picture: that our universe is a bubble or membrane floating in a much larger multiverse or megaverse of bubble-universes.

Unfortunately, although black hole solutions have been found in string theory, the theory is not yet developed to answer basic questions about wormholes and their stability. Within the next few years or perhaps within a decade, many physicists believe that string theory will mature to the point where it can answer these fundamental questions about space and time. The problem is well-defined. Unfortunately, even though the leading scientists on the planet are working on the theory, no one on earth is smart enough to solve the superstring equations."




regards
seekerof



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