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Ask And You Shall Receive: Sharpton Goes After Abusive Music

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posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 08:52 PM
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During the Imus fiasco, many posters demanded that Rev. Al Sharpton, outspoken advocate for the African American community, take a stand against Rap Music.

Well, this week Rev. Sharpton announced that he will soon go after music that is disrespectful, which was a reiteration of a comment he made last year in Newsweek.



Al Sharpton also plans to talk to the FCC about an airwaves ban on rappers who don't respect women. "If they've got the right to call my daughter a b----," Sharpton says, "I have a right to say 'boycott'."

www.msnbc.msn.com...


I applaud Rev. Sharpton and hereby advise a good place to start:

Vivendi is the parent company of Universal Music Group (UMG), which has 50 Cent and Eminem under contract. The CEO and President, Zach Horowitz, is probably the place to start (this guy should have to answer for all that nasty music)...this company is making a mint using a lot of performers to disseminate some really disgusting "product". But this is big business...check out UMG's "specs"...



Universal Music Group (UMG) is the world's No.1 music company . Its global operations encompass the production and distribution of recorded music on CDs, videos and DVDs, the licensing of music copyrights and music publishing.

Present in 77 countries, UMG had 25.5% of the worldwide market (source: IFPI): in 2004, almost one out of every four albums sold worldwide was a UMG album - over one in every four in the U.S. and approximately one in every three in France.

UMG is also the world leader in jazz and classical music with approximately 40% of classical music sales worldwide.
Vivendi-UMG


Oh, and this Vivendi company also produces and distributes those murderous video games that our kids are playing.

I HOPE REV. AL GOES AFTER THEM WITH VIGOR...Rev. I am cheering you on! I will support the BOYCOTT.




posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 09:26 PM
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I have to agree with this, and I've only come to this stance recently.

I've always had the "Laissez Faire" mentality when it comes to the music industry. However, my personal perspective has changed recently. In my latest position, I attend youth court every week. Sometimes twice a week. So every young person that is charged with any crime, I am present in the court room when they are arraigned. If I have seen fifty young people appear in court in the last few weeks, forty nine of them were dressed as if they were an icon in the Rap industry.

Hat too big for their head and on sideways, shirt down to their knees, pants way to big for them, and their whole presence reeks of copy cat from their favorite rapper.

Is there a coincidence here that 98% of the young offenders in my community dress like rappers? These individuals are predominately white, so this is not a "race" issue in my community by any stretch of the imagination, but I can't help but feel this industry has overtly impacted the lives of these individuals.

Why is it that every young person being arraigned on a crime is dressed like 50 cent?

Don't get me wrong, I listen to rap music. Huge fan of Eminem, 50 Cent, 2-Pac, Biggie, Snoop, etc. Some of their lyrics make other genres look like children's nursery rhymes. But others do nothing but degrade anything in sight.

I think something does need to change on this front though. Not sure what it is because I do not support censorship, but maybe the mass media should refrain from blasting these individuals to the iconic figures that they currently are.

I don't have the answers, just the questions.




posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 09:47 PM
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Awesome. I just posted about him not taking a stand on rap, and I find this. Bill O'Reilly called him out. The only problem here is that it will probably split the african-american population more than anything... and sadly enough the whites buy enough of this music to keep it "rolling dirty."



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 09:48 PM
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Thank you for your comment, chissler; this gangsta rap thing has spread like a virus-- from the CEO's desk, to the African American communty, to other races here in America, and now throughout the world (kinda reminds me of how illegal drugs spread, after being planted in the Black community)! There is so much money involved that the preservation of society does not matter to these people. These people are BIG MONEY PEOPLE.


Originally posted by chissler
In my latest position, I attend youth court every week. Sometimes twice a week. So every young person that is charged with any crime, I am present in the court room when they are arraigned. If I have seen fifty young people appear in court in the last few weeks, forty nine of them were dressed as if they were an icon in the Rap industry.

Poor little things think they are looking cool. And those clothes cost a fortune too. I see kids with no apparent resources wearing very expensive clothes and I wonder who is buying them?

This should have been nipped in the bud as soon as it started; people tried to stop the nasty lyrics years ago, but for the big shots like Mr. Horowitz there was too much money at stake.

Large corporations rule! I think they pay to suppress dissent...

It's a shame what we have allowed our youth to be exposed to, and they are further victimized because they are victims of this trash. Their clothes dictate how they are treated by law enforcement, teachers, employers, and even their parents...and all they really want is to "fit in". That's why I was so happy with the school uniforms...and then the schools discontinued uniforms!

I don't want to seem paranoid, but if I were a manufacturer of hip hop clothing, I would work to get school uniforms discontinued...hmmm.



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 09:58 PM
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Something useful for a change. Good.

I think the music does as much harm sometimes.



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 10:05 PM
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Originally posted by collielikethedog
The only problem here is that it will probably split the african-american population more than anything


Collie,

You may be right, but then again I have spoken to young people, and the thing they like most about rap is not the words so much, it's the beat...the beats are bad...and personally, I like them too, those beats make me want to shake my old hips a big, lol!

And, hey, don't forget that there are "elements" who are willing to finance demonstrations/riots, where our youth fights for "freedom of speech" (?) and the freedom to have the music they want...big business fights dirty, and there's a lot of money involved.

These people (CEO's/decisionmakers) are ruthless, and they may not allow any moves against their fortunes...so what if the world's youth is destroyed?



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 10:39 PM
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This story looks to be almost a year old.
So, like what happened?

It's the may 9th issue.
The end of the story says "copyright 2006"..

just saying..



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 10:43 PM
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Rap music has always been a part of the military-prison-industrial gulag. It suckers young people into becoming jail bait, then prison bait for a larger privatized (confiscated) system. Rap music, while masquerading as a kind of reality poetry of protest, actually promotes anti-social behavior to act as a usher and shoehorn of this injustice system, ahem justice system.

So it is one big "duh," for Al Sharpton, who should forgive Imus for mouthing off the same kind of trash that heavily promoted rap music uses. It never occurs to him that his "rap," was of the same as theirs, an almost ironic tone of familiarity. That is what is forbidden, when you realize the double standard and segregation of political correctness. Now make a distinction, there are different varieties of rap music, not all is "gangsta," rap. There are significant cultural expositions. Uncaring unconscious outcomes must be subject for further conversation. Cutting off Imus before he can defend himself, then apologize for hurt feelings is in order. He is not the bad man portrayed in the media, just for one moment too at ease with popular culture, perhaps even blind to race distinctions. If there is anything to it, the lesson is to quit projecting 1950s stereotypes on innocent people. Imus is not the police fire hosing civil rights protesters. He is an entertainer. It is a shame that people would not be so offended at common popular speech, other than that is comes from someone who "fits the profile," such as Imus.

For that matter how about bothering Ann Coulter for her racist comments about African genocide. Some's got a free pass, others bite the dust.

[edit on 12-4-2007 by SkipShipman]



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 10:45 PM
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Originally posted by spacedoubt
This story looks to be almost a year old.
So, like what happened?

It's the may 9th issue.
The end of the story says "copyright 2006"..

just saying..


Sharpton said this last year, but recently (during the Imus fiasco) he reaffirmed his intent...I saw this on MSNBC today, and I just can't wait for him to begin!

I just want to know what people have to say about Reb's new campaign? I love it, hope he kicks booty!

Any thoughts?



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 10:56 PM
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CSIfan..

Sure, I have some thought on this.
I just wanted to make sure the age of the article was known.

With Sharpton, I'll believe it when I see it.
He seems to be more intent on creating rage, rallying anger, than fixing any problems. He seems to thrive on the attention that he himself generates.

I'm just not so sure than he is working for the good of anyone, other than himself.
And if he happened to "fix" an issue like this, it's almost self-defeating.
If we all got along, what would he do for a "living"?



posted on Apr, 12 2007 @ 11:32 PM
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Originally posted by spacedoubt
CSIfan..
With Sharpton, I'll believe it when I see it.
He seems to be more intent on creating rage, rallying anger, than fixing any problems. He seems to thrive on the attention that he himself generates.

I'm just not so sure than he is working for the good of anyone, other than himself.

Now, come one, do you actually think that Rev. Sharpton enjoys what he does? You are aware that he is risking his life for the Justice that he seeks? And how much is his life worth? This is a wild country, many have been killed for advocating for the rights of the downtrodden...keep in mind that Dr. Martin Luther King was ridiculed and hated during his time. The news was full of slurs against Dr. King, and in the end, he lost his life fighting injustice.

It may not mean much to you, but there are many people who have no one to turn to but someone like Rev. Sharpton. My good friend actually took Mrs. Diallo to meet with Rev. Sharpton right after her son was shot dead...he was a "rock" of strength for her, and he helped bring this case to national attention. Her innocent son had been shot 41 times by Police because they thought he was reaching for a gun. He had no gun, and was an innocent man coming home from work!

African American parents live with the fear of Police shootings, much more than regular crime...that's here in NYC that I know of, and many more places, probably throughout the country. Sort of like a Mother used to fear a lynching. Most of the time, the killer is never punished.

Rev. Al Sharpton is a hero to many people, and as hated as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was in his lifetime.

Interesting isn't it?

[edit on 12-4-2007 by CSIfan]

[edit on 12-4-2007 by CSIfan]



posted on Apr, 13 2007 @ 12:28 AM
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Originally posted by SkipShipman
Rap music has always been a part of the military-prison-industrial gulag. It suckers young people into becoming jail bait, then prison bait for a larger privatized (confiscated) system. Rap music, while masquerading as a kind of reality poetry of protest, actually promotes anti-social behavior to act as a usher and shoehorn of this injustice system, ahem justice system.


I agree, Rap comes from the prison experience, which too many were forced to live with...but, rap is, in fact, a sort of protest. Look at the mess that is the legacy of these young people, young people all over the world. I personally accept responsibility for the legacy, the climate where they can be shot by police or roughed up at will. Had we "elders" armed ourselves and prevented this 30 years ago, these young people would not have to live with this mess.

Look at the mess that young people all over the world are dealing with: Capitalism in its most vicious form, a very insecure future, offshoring? And let's not forget perpetual war...all the dirty tricks that rich old men can muster...these things are handicapping our youth and their concept of a future. Why, it's rich old men who decided to exploit the prison experience of young people...these old guys built a multi-billion dollar industry (RAP MUSIC) by just exploiting our young people further...and not to mention the rap clothing industry...probably the same old rich men...



For that matter how about bothering Ann Coulter for her racist comments about African genocide. Some's got a free pass, others bite the dust.

I don't like Ann Coulter, but until she points me out on TV and makes specific accusations about me, or anyone else specifically (like Imus did), she is no problem, just another nut case. (does anyone take her seriously?) Forget about Imus, he's finished...he has gone the way that all old bigots should go. Our world has to change...it will either change or destroy itself!

She can talk about Africa all day...I don't know anything about Africa...
I am an African American...a race of people specific to AMERICA!

About Rev. Sharpton though, if they don't assassinate him first, I believe that he may be successful in challenging these rich old men to stop producing nasty rap music, and force them to replace all of the disrespectful lyrics...and that would be good for America and the world...that is what we all hope for, isn't it?



posted on Apr, 13 2007 @ 01:16 AM
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Now, come one, do you actually think that Rev. Sharpton enjoys what he does? You are aware that he is risking his life for the Justice that he seeks?


Yes, I think he enjoys the attention, and that if he isn't getting enough, he ratchets it up a bit.. Tawana Brawley, of Wappingers Falls comes to mind.


It may not mean much to you, but there are many people who have no one to turn to but someone like Rev. Sharpton.

That is a real shame too. Why do so many people feel thats all that they have?
Is there no one else in the 300 million population of america they could turn to?



My good friend actually took Mrs. Diallo to meet with Rev. Sharpton right after her son was shot dead...he was a "rock" of strength for her, and he helped bring this case to national attention. Her innocent son had been shot 41 times by Police because they thought he was reaching for a gun. He had no gun, and was an innocent man coming home from work!


I remember this story well. I'm sure he was a rock for her. It was terrible, wasn't he just reaching for his wallet?
But, my friend, I can't help but think Sharpton was being a rock, for himself.
He feels like an opportunist to me.



posted on Apr, 13 2007 @ 03:34 AM
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One needs to be very careful in support of what Sharpton, and others, as well as those calling for him to take a stance against any kind of music or talk radio.

1st Amendment people....

You don't like the music, don't buy it...

You don't like talk radio, turn the channel..

The erosion of our rights almost assuredly will not be an all out attack. It most likely will come as an outcry against morally and ethically offensive things that are "according" to the general public.

I don't particularly care for Rap music, especially that music that calls for the "killing of cops", but I support the artist's right to make that music.

We start losing freedoms people, where will it stop?

This may look innocent and "best for all" on the surface, but much like a snowball, things like this garner a life of their own and pretty soon we will be limited to what we can say on here...

Just My Opinion

Semper



posted on Apr, 13 2007 @ 06:06 AM
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You have voted semperfortis for the Way Above Top Secret award. You have one more vote left for this month.

What a load of rubbish no one is forced to buy rap music or chose song lyrics as there moral values system. I have played most of the Grand Theft Auto games and yet I don't embark on crime sprees.
People sometimes make bad choices and they have to face the consequences that's just life. The rest of us should not have to suffer because of other peoples poor choices.

If it wasn't rap music and video games it would be something else these clowns always need something to put the blame of people bad choices on other then the people themselves.



posted on Apr, 13 2007 @ 06:22 AM
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Originally posted by CSIfan
Rev. Sharpton announced that he will soon go after music that is disrespectful,


AWESOME!!
This is EXACTLY what I was wanting to hear. I had very high hopes that after IMUS got in trouble for what he did, that everyone would look to the other garbage that is being rhythmically pounded into the heads of youth and young Americans. FANTASTIC.


which was a reiteration of a comment he made last year in Newsweek..


Oh. Well .... hmmmm. He said he'll go after it 'soon'. And he said the same thing a year ago. Not to be picky, but what the heck ... what is he waiting for???



this gangsta rap thing has spread like a virus--


YES. And i am going to go so far as to say it has EVIL backing it.
It is distructive. It is mndless anger. It ruins lives. It is evil.


do you actually think that Rev. Sharpton enjoys what he does?

Yes, yes i do. I think he enjoys the media spotlight. I think he enjoys the attention. I think he enjoys the perception that he's some kind of black leader. I think he enjoys the $$$ (his shady finances say so). etc etc YES, I think he enjoys himself VERY much.


You are aware that he is risking his life for the Justice that he seeks?

Up to this point he has not been risking his life. He is seen as a buffoon and a racist by people of all skin colors in this nation. He has no credibility.

HOWEVER, if he ever really does go after the music/video industry for the garbage that they are pounding into the youth; for the garbage that they are making money off of the youth with; THEN he will have his life in danger. I will support his efforts in this area if he actually does what he says he wants to do 'soon'.

EXCELLENT discussion CSIfan!


[edit on 4/13/2007 by FlyersFan]



posted on Apr, 13 2007 @ 06:26 AM
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Originally posted by semperfortis
1st Amendment people....


I completely understand what you are saying semper. Really I do.

People ALSO have a right to educate others about what is in that 'music' and the effects that it has on people.

When young people have anger rhythically pounded into their brains day after day after day ... and they are told that they should be angry and to go shoot cops ... they are going to get angry and they are either going to go shoot cops or take their new found anger out on someone around them - (like women and girls???)

As I said, I understand the free speech thing. It's very precious. But we also have an obligation to educate people as to what is in that crap that is being aimed at the youth and what the effects are. It's nasty!



posted on Apr, 13 2007 @ 07:09 AM
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Sharpton says this from time to time but never really follows thru on his threat. The problem is, he needs his following and his following like the very music he claims he wants to boycott. So, he will talk about it, he will respond when questioned but, odds are, he won't do a thing beyond that.

Shame really because he has the ability to make a change in this area and that change might actually have an impact on society whereas the firing of a racist like Imus won't really do much towards ridding us of other racists and the one racist at a time process of elimination will never clean up the problem. Sure it helps but it is the equivalent of removing one flea on a mangy, infested mutt.



posted on Apr, 13 2007 @ 07:17 AM
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Im curious to see if Sharptons crusade is met with applause while when Reagan and Bush Sr. tried to impose standards on the music industry the whole nation was up in arms crying "censorship! censorship!" and all they wanted to do was stick the Parental Advisory label on.

But then again when are white conservative males ever met with anything but hatred? A black Democrat takes up the same cause and he gets hoisted onto shoulders and paraded through the streets. Now if only Sharpton was a woman he'd be holier than Jesus.



posted on Apr, 13 2007 @ 07:38 AM
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As I said, I understand the free speech thing. It's very precious. But we also have an obligation to educate people as to what is in that crap that is being aimed at the youth and what the effects are. It's nasty


And that is your right under the 1st...

I support that as well and as completely... (And Agree)

Semper





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