Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Questions about Masonry: an open and honest forum

page: 5
26
<< 2  3  4    6  7  8 >>

log in

join

posted on Apr, 6 2007 @ 05:59 AM
link   
Has anyone else noticed an increase in civility on all the active threads since this one was started? Not only is there no participation here by the anti-mason faction on this thread but there seems to be a total absence of “trolling” right now.

Not sure if it is my imagination or not but if so that is a secondary benefit to this tread and extra credit to W K for starting this is due.




posted on Apr, 6 2007 @ 11:19 AM
link   
Anyone care to discuss the frequency in which modern day masons use symbolism in architechture? Is this mode of communication still used between members?



posted on Apr, 6 2007 @ 12:25 PM
link   

Originally posted by Stewart Lewis
Anyone care to discuss the frequency in which modern day masons use symbolism in architechture? Is this mode of communication still used between members?


Yes, Masonic symbols are still built into some major buildings. Usually it is left to the first corner stone, however some buildings may have Masonic themed engravings, statue, mosaic, memorial, anything really.

It is NOT a mode of communication, it has nothing to do with it.. what it is, is that the designer was a Mason, and most likely a very active Mason who loves the craft, and so he built some designs into the building he created.

That is not at all unusual, Christian designers often put small subtle Christian symbols or saying into buildings they erect, not because he wants to communicate with people entering the building, but because it is his own belief.

Building a building is more often then not an art work, especially large public buildings, they are built to impress. So when you take such time and energy to build your masterpiece, you are more inclined to add things that are important to you.. Masonry might be one of them, but so could a number of other things..

Not all "Masonic looking" objects or designs you see on buildings are in fact Masonic either.. they may look the same in some ways, but not quite entirely, I have seen many pics on ATS in which a member thinks he found secret Masonic language and it turns out to be nothing at all.

[edit on 4/6/2007 by Rockpuck]



posted on Apr, 6 2007 @ 12:38 PM
link   
can you recomend an authoritative dictionary or encyclopedia about Fraternal symbols? I have just a few books of this nature, but doesn't seem to be a whole lot of this material out there that is comprhensive yet credible. Any recomendations?
Also anyone familiar with the legend of Hiram Abiff? I'm looking for any clues as to his death so far visual material goes.

I must say this is a well spun thread. thanks to all for a civil expierence.



posted on Apr, 6 2007 @ 12:39 PM
link   


Evolution of the cornerstone ceremony

The Masonic cornerstone ceremony, like most complex customs, has evolved over years of use. It is easy for the romantic to imagine King Solomon using our current rituals to lay the cornerstone of the Temple of the Lord in Jerusalem, but such was not the case. The Masonic cornerstone ceremony first appeared in the middle 1700s and in less than a century had finished evolving, except for minor grammatical changes. The procedure, at least as used in America, can be traced fairly well through its entire evolution, though Grand Lodges differ on the exact details of their cornerstone ceremonies.

THE FIRST RECORDED MASONIC CEREMONY. “The earliest record of a formal and official Masonic ceremony is that of the laying of the Foundation Stone of the New Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh by the Earl of Cromarty, Grand Master of Scottish Masons, on August 2, 1738.” The description of the event was written sixty-six years later in 1804 by Alexander Lawrie in his History of free Masonry. Lawrie describes a simple, almost primitive ceremony.

“When the company came to the ground, the Grand Master, and his brethren of the free and accepted Masons, surrounded the plan of the foundation hand in hand: and the Grand Master-Mason. along with the press [representatives] of the Managers of the Royal Infirmary, having come to the east corner of the foundation where the stone was to be laid, placed the same in its bed; and after the Right Honorable the Lord Provost had laid a medal under it each in their turns gave three strokes upon the stone with an iron mallet, which was succeeded by three clarions of the trumpet, three huzzas, and three claps of the hands.”


I hardily recommend to anyone, regardless of Masonic affiliation to attend a cornerstone ceremony. It's one of the few ceremonies in Freemasonry that is public (the other two being a Masonic Funeral, and the Installation of Officers). The unique aspect is that is the one time where Operative Freemasonry and Speculative Freemasonry merge at point, and present themselves in a form that is quite revealing.




[edit on 6/4/2007 by Mirthful Me]



posted on Apr, 6 2007 @ 12:51 PM
link   
MirthfulMe,
I imagine there to be variations on this ceremony. For instance, the lodge here in my town has the cornerstone laid in the northwest corner.
I speculate placing the stone to the east represents Venus as the Morning Star; if this assumption is true than placing the stone in the west may signify Venus as the Evening Star. Any thoughts?



posted on Apr, 6 2007 @ 01:11 PM
link   
There's no reason, or symbolism for the Northwest... The Northeast... Absolutely (as any Entered Apprentice would be able to tell you.


There is no "specification" that the stone go in a particular corner (I am looking at the ceremony right now), but the traditional place is the Northeast corner. The Cornerstone should be the first stone laid above the foundation line, and it is specified that it is to be suspended with a traditional derrick, with block and tackle. The stone should be engraved with the the date (AD & AL), name of the Grand Master, and any other information deemed necessary.

There is a provision for the cornerstone to be inserted into a completed building.



Masonic Calendar

ANNO BENEFACIO: (A.B.) Latin for "In the Year of the Blessing." Used by the Order of High Priesthood for dating their documents. (1930 added to the current date.)

ANNO DEPOSITIONIS: (A.Dep.) Latin for "In the Year of the Deposit. "The Cryptic Masonic date designation. (Add 1000 to the current date.)

ANNO DOMINI: (A.D.) Latin for "Year of our Lord."

ANNO INVENTIONIS: (A.I.) Latin meaning "In the Year of Discovery." The Royal Arch date designation. (Add 530 to the current date.)

ANNO LUCIS: (A.L.) Latin mean­ing "In the Year of Light, "the date used by Ancient Craft Masonry. (Add 4000 to the current date.)

ANNO MUNDI: (A.M.) Latin meaning "In the Year of the World." The date used by the Scottish Rite. (Add 3760 to the current year until September; if after September, add 3761)

ANNO ORDINIS: (A.0.) Latin, thin meaning "In the Year of the Order." The date used by the Knights Templar. (Subtract 1118 from the current date)



posted on Apr, 6 2007 @ 03:18 PM
link   

Originally posted by benevolent tyrant

[snippity snip snip]....Some people were raised to think that Catholics aren't even Christian! (Just as some might have been raised to think that Masonry is anti-Christian).


Minor quibble in lexicon, BT. Those people were raised to believe such and such, not think for were they to actually investigate and think for themselves, more often than not, they'd find themselves astounded at the myopia of what was ingrained in them.

My two bits Canuck FWIW



posted on Apr, 6 2007 @ 06:59 PM
link   
To both Stewart Lewis and Masonic Student:

Thank you both for your kind words.
I just want to make a level playing field for intelligent discussion.
Well, that, and I would love to hear from more senior members of the Craft because I love learning as much as I can about it.
I've learned some new things too from this thread, so I'm as excited as you are.
But again, thanx.


And to my other brothers who have thus far contributed:

Thank you so much for helping to dispel rumors, spread knowledge and truth and above all, contribute to the fine legacy of this Craft that we all hold so dear.


-Wu K'ung



posted on Apr, 7 2007 @ 06:59 AM
link   


Here is the cornerstone in question. It is to the right side of the building, allmost behind the van. This placement is in the northwest. also interesting is that the columns are gold. This is the only pic online i could find with the cornerstone in it. the text on the stone is as follows:

Berea lodge 617
F & AM
1922

I also notice the columns are of the corinthian style. Could this an indication this is a lodge of the Corinthian Order? I have reference to such a goup in the "Encyclopedia of Freemasonry" by A. Mackey.
If so this is a good example of what i meant in an earlier post on this thread about communicating through design of building.

Forgive me if my picture doesn't turn up correctly, i am a rookie at posting pics.

[edit on 7-4-2007 by Stewart Lewis]

[edit on 7-4-2007 by Stewart Lewis]



posted on Apr, 7 2007 @ 10:37 AM
link   
I see the corner stone, though I do not know which corner is typically the spot that they are placed.. I have never been to a corner stone ceremony before.


How ever.. the lodge is a typical small lodge, the architecture does not relate to the actual lodge that meets there, it is simply a product of the times, and if I am not mistaken, that is a rather old building.




My lodge meets in this building, along with about 6 other blue lodges..




This is a Masonic Center from Colorado.. notice it looks entirely different. The main reason for the difference is when the building is built.. the building I meet in was built in the 1920's, where as this I am certain is a reletively newer building, thus a more modern design.



A lodge from Stockton California..



This is a small lodge from Seattle Washington..



This one from Wisconsin..

My point, no 2 lodges are alike.. some look like small chapels, some like store fronts, some like huge romantic buildings you would expect to see in DC.. in Europe I am told it is not to uncommon to find lodges simply upstairs from a store or pub..

So architecture has nothing to do with who's actually meeting there..



posted on Apr, 7 2007 @ 01:14 PM
link   

Originally posted by Stewart Lewis
Anyone care to discuss the frequency in which modern day masons use symbolism in architechture?


I would say that the frequency is pretty much non-existent, due to the fact that very few architects are Freemasons these days.


Is this mode of communication still used between members?


No.



posted on Apr, 7 2007 @ 05:38 PM
link   
I'd just like to ask those members if you could explain briefly why you became a mason and do you consider freemasonry a secret society? If so, what purpose does the secrecy serve?

And if anyone has in-depth knowledge of the Mormon religion, do you consider it based on masonry?



posted on Apr, 7 2007 @ 06:09 PM
link   
I became a Mason because I wanted to be a part of something greater than myself.
To learn and to keep alive the traditions and spirit of the fraternity.
To enjoy the company of those who feel the same way.
Oh yeah, and to eat lots of spaghetti!

I mean, y'know among other reasons.




posted on Apr, 7 2007 @ 07:01 PM
link   

Originally posted by gottago
I'd just like to ask those members if you could explain briefly why you became a mason and do you consider freemasonry a secret society? If so, what purpose does the secrecy serve?


I became a Mason after having studied its history, and most especially its philosophy, which was identical to my own.

We do not consider Freemasonry a secret society. We consider it a fraternity which, like all fraternities, has its own peculiar and traditional secrets. These "secrets" have no meaning for non-Masons, but are important for those in the fraternity as it links them with the past and with tradition.



And if anyone has in-depth knowledge of the Mormon religion, do you consider it based on masonry?


The actual Mormon religion is not based on Masonry. However, their Temple rituals certainly ARE based on Masonic ceremonies. It was an obvious plagiarism.



posted on Apr, 7 2007 @ 09:05 PM
link   
I am curious.
Have any of you read The Book of Hiram?
And if so, what did you think?

I just started reading it and I find it fascinating.

What are your thoughts?





posted on Apr, 8 2007 @ 08:54 AM
link   

Originally posted by gottago
I'd just like to ask those members if you could explain briefly why you became a mason and do you consider freemasonry a secret society? If so, what purpose does the secrecy serve?

I certainly do not consider freemasonry a secret society. I think most people understand the difference between secrecy and privacy.



posted on Apr, 8 2007 @ 09:54 AM
link   

I am curious.
Have any of you read The Book of Hiram?
And if so, what did you think?


I am about a 1/3 the way through it at the moment. My reading of it is connected to my above post about the visual details of Hiram's murder; I am a professional painter and have decided to depict this scene.

Wu, please tell me of anything you find that would be valuable to such a project as we read through "Book of Hiram".

As to secrecy in Masonry, read as follows;

M. Coquerel: "As to Freemasonry your commitee has decided that it is not a secret society. A society may have a secret, and yet not be a secret society."

from, the National Assembly of France, 1848.

also see;

"...Freemasonry, which is a secret society only as respects its signs, a few of its legends and traditions, and its method of inculcating it's mystical philosophy, but which, as to everything else--it's design, its object, it's moral and religious tenets, and it's doctrine which it teaches--is as open a society as if it meet on the highways beneath the sun of the day, and not within the well guarded portals of the lodge."

taken from "Encyclopedia of Freemasonry, vol M-Z, by Albert Mackey, 1915, page 677."

I am not a member so must rely on dusty old books like the one above. hope this helps someone's inquiry.



posted on Apr, 8 2007 @ 03:38 PM
link   

Originally posted by Masonic Light

We do not consider Freemasonry a secret society. We consider it a fraternity which, like all fraternities, has its own peculiar and traditional secrets. These "secrets" have no meaning for non-Masons, but are important for those in the fraternity as it links them with the past and with tradition.

The actual Mormon religion is not based on Masonry. However, their Temple rituals certainly ARE based on Masonic ceremonies. It was an obvious plagiarism.


Thanks for your reply. I thought it very interesting that you stress the linkage with the past and tradition, since both are increasingly diluted and enfeebled in today's world. Politically then, are Masons predominantly conservatives? Have you seen a growth in membership from those seeking a deeper grounding in--for lack of a better word--tradition?

Do you feel that the secrets Masonry imparts enrich your life? And if so, in which ways? And if I understand Masonry correctly as broadly Humanistic, then what is the reason for not sharing these enriching secrets with everyone, as one does with religion? Historically it is a society of the ruling classes, the elites, so one could draw the conclusion that the secrecy is serving to perpetuate these structures--your thoughts?

As for the Mormon religion, what do you think the purpose of incorporating Masonic ritual is? Isn't this then a commingling of Christianity and Masonry, since the ritual has a meaning and purpose created and defined by Masonry and is basic to the practice of the Mormon faith?



posted on Apr, 8 2007 @ 05:42 PM
link   

Originally posted by Stewart Lewis
Wu, please tell me of anything you find that would be valuable to such a project as we read through "Book of Hiram".


Should I find anything that truly stands out, I will bring it to your attention post haste.

I would also love to see your visual interpretations of such scenes.
Please, notify me as to your progress as I am most curious.






top topics



 
26
<< 2  3  4    6  7  8 >>

log in

join


Help ATS Recover with your Donation.
read more: Help ATS Recover With Your Contribution