US Depression Tremors: Subprime Lenders in Meltdown

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posted on Mar, 18 2007 @ 05:37 PM
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Originally posted by Regenmacher

China raises interest rates Financial Times, UK



This won't have a chaos effect like when restrictions came out on lending on China, but the market will become concerned about Chinese slowdown.

But still, I feel that one more large drop in the global markets is going to have a bad effect in the States.




posted on Mar, 18 2007 @ 05:54 PM
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Feds are to make a statement on wednesday,

just getting the basics on bloomberg, it ain't gonna be pretty



posted on Mar, 19 2007 @ 07:33 PM
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Happy war day, everyone. So, the Fed meets this coming Wednesday. Any guesses about how they'll go with the interest rates? If they don't leave it alone, I say they may drop it by a quarter point.



posted on Mar, 20 2007 @ 07:28 AM
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The meeting starts to day, two-day event

Statement is released tomorrow.

Some news...

U.S. Stock-Index Futures Decline; Home Depot, Citigroup Retreat





March 20 (Bloomberg) -- U.S. stock-index futures fell before a report that may show new home construction held near a nine- year low last month, renewing concern that the slowdown in the housing market may stall economic growth.

Home Depot Inc., the world's largest home-improvement retailer, slid after saying two directors will step down after an annual meeting in May. Citigroup Inc., the biggest U.S. bank, retreated before the start of a two-day meeting by the Federal Reserve that will likely result in no changes to interest rates.

``I don't think the correction is over as not enough time has elapsed and the background issues are still there,'' said Rupert Della-Porta, who oversees $4 billion as head of U.S. equities at F&C Asset Management in London. ``We are not expecting a rate cut, but the market would like to hear that the Fed is watching the deterioration in housing and credit.''


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Bloomberg



posted on Mar, 20 2007 @ 01:50 PM
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In light of last weeks inflation numbers, it appears the consensus on Wall St. sees the Fed treading water this session, with Bernanke continuing to jawbone inflation concerns...pretty much the same old, same old. It's anticipated that the next move won't come until they have a clearer picture of a bottoming in the housing market...possibly by the fourth quarter.

From what I'm hearing out of Greenspan recently regarding recession, and given his history, he might be easing the overnight lending rate now. Evidently, there's some concern that the Bernanke Fed may get a late start.

Spreading contagion from the sub-slime mortage market, and today's weak building permit data, are expected to contribute to a slowing economy.

Peace &
Good Fortune
OBE1



posted on Mar, 20 2007 @ 05:10 PM
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I think Greenspan is only saying what the Fed are too scared to say public.

Wednesday statement is going to be an interesting read



posted on Mar, 21 2007 @ 08:12 AM
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And...here we are. It's Wednesday. I'm sure we're all interested to see what these guys have to say. The more I look at this problem, the more I think they're just gonna leave the interest rates where they are.



posted on Mar, 21 2007 @ 12:31 PM
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Stocks Remain Little Changed Ahead of Fed Decision





Stocks were mixed, trading basically at a standstill as investors waited for comments from the Federal Reserve on the health of the economy. Volatility was low with the Dow trading in a narrow 38-point range.

"The markets really have no leadership right now," Gina Sanchez, portfolio manager for The California Endowment, told CNBC. "Part of what will help is knowing what the Fed is going to do."


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


www.cnbc.com...



posted on Mar, 21 2007 @ 01:09 PM
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This missive by Stephen Tetreault yesterday, kinda cuts through the BS regarding the Feds position going into today's FOMC meeting today. If his prognosis proves out...no rate change, with no strong statement of a bias towards easing...the markets may not be happy by the closing bell. www.financialsense.com...

We'll know in a few minutes.


Peace &
Good fortune
OBE1



posted on Mar, 21 2007 @ 01:14 PM
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Fed Is Expected to Voice Concern About Slowing Economy





Caught between stubbornly elevated U.S. inflation and signs of weaker economic growth, the Federal Reserve is expected to hold interest rates steady as it wraps up a two-day policy-setting meeting on Wednesday.

While a decision to keep benchmark overnight borrowing costs at 5.25% is widely expected, financial markets are eagerly awaiting word on how the U.S. central bank views the economic outlook.

Most economists expect the Fed to reiterate concerns over inflation when it announces its decision around 2:15 pm New York time.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


www.cnbc.com...



posted on Mar, 21 2007 @ 01:18 PM
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Federal Reserve Leaves Fed Rate Unchanged at 5.25%




posted on Mar, 21 2007 @ 07:28 PM
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According to Wall St, Ben did a masterful job of walking the tightrope today. He wisely avoided directly addressing the housing crises...jawboned inflation concers, yet dropped the term "additional firming" from this sessions FedSpeak. Looks like the market interpreted this as a signal of rate cuts to come...with short covering contributing to today's rally.

I think the market's right. In my opinion, the Fed will soon be inclined to defend the economy, and further sacrifice the dollar.

The dollar response to today's 2pm announcement:



Peace &
Good Fortune
OBE1


[edit on 21-3-2007 by OBE1]



posted on Mar, 22 2007 @ 02:18 AM
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I apologize for the unavailable photo link to yesterday's dollar chart...let me try again here...thanks.

Peace &
Good Fortune
OBE1



posted on Mar, 22 2007 @ 06:10 AM
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The decision by the Fed to not move interest rates seems to have been well received. From what I can tell, this move won't do anything to slow or halt the current rate of defaults. I spent time on a radio show last week talking about the simple task of paying off your plastic. Considering that economics is not my specialty, I'm surprised that anyone cares what I think on the subject. Must've been a slow news day.





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