Mad Cow disease in US!

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posted on Dec, 24 2003 @ 09:55 AM
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Well, hopefully it means it won't be an issue, and we'll all be dead or have a cure by the time it starts showing up




posted on Dec, 24 2003 @ 10:29 AM
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Well all, I have done my homework and Mrs. Zedd just happens to work for a biomedical firm that makes the most accurate and fastest BSE test equipment on the market. Here some good info for you...

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy is the clinical name, referred to as BSE. Also known as Mad Cow and as John Titor called it in his "predictions"...Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease. The transmissible agent is neither a virus nor other previously known infectious agent, but rather an unconventional agent consisting of protein. This newly-discovered pathogen is called a "prion", short for " proteinaceous infectious particle". Prions are thought to transform normal, benign protein molecules into infectious, deadly ones by altering the shape of the healthy molecules to the dangerous conformation. This transformation then induces a chain reaction to alter the shape of the other benign protein molecules into the deadly form. The suspected prion diseases occurring in animals consist of: scrapie in sheep and goats; transmissible mink encephalopathy; chronic wasting disease of mule deer and elk; feline spongiform encephalopathy; and, bovine spongiform encephalopathy ("BSE"), also known as "mad cow disease". TSEs have also been found in some exotic zoo animals.

In the United Kingdom, scientists have ascertained a likely connection between bovine spongiform encephalopathy ("BSE") and CJD. BSE or "mad cow disease" was initially discovered in the United Kingdom in 1986 and thought to have resulted from the use of cattle feed containing contaminated meat and bone meal made from scrapie-infected sheep and/or TSE-infected cattle. The original outbreak was then probably magnified by subsequently feeding meat and bone meal from BSE-infected cows to young calves.

The FDA does have a contingency plan and here is a link for those interested.
www.fda.gov...

And more BSE info you can read at:
www.fda.gov...

I also bet this article slipped by most of you about feed used at a Texas feedlot that was suspected of containing meat and bone meal from other domestic cattle....the prime method of starting BSE. This is most likely the cause in this new case.
www.fda.gov...

What about protecting you beloved pets?
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has learned from the government of Canada that rendered material from a Canadian cow that last week tested positive for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, also known as mad cow disease) may have been used to manufacture pet food, specifically dry dog food, some of which was reported to have been shipped to the United States. The Canadian government prevented the BSE positive cow from being processed for human food. Therefore, consumers can be assured that their food does not contain any remnants of the BSE positive cow. It is also important to stress that there is no scientific evidence to date that dogs can contract BSE or any similar disease. In addition there is no evidence that dogs can transmit the disease to humans.
www.fda.gov...

Well, even though we are not to be using those type of "transmission" feeds, the disease turns up in Washington State. Well, what about this? The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today announced the filing of a Consent Decree of Permanent Injunction against X-Cel, Feeds Inc., and individual officers based on violations of the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. In the Consent Decree, the Firm and officers admitted liability for introducing adulterated and misbranded animal feeds into interstate commerce and agreed to implement measures to correct the violations under FDA's supervision. X-Cel, a feed manufacturer headquartered in Tacoma, Washington, failed to comply with FDA regulations (the 1997 Animal Feed Rule) designed to prevent the establishment and spread of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE, also known as "Mad Cow Disease") should it ever be found in the United States and FDA regulations concerning the manufacture of medicated feeds. "No case of BSE has ever been documented in the U.S., despite aggressive surveillance, said FDA Commissioner Mark B. McClellan, M.D., Ph.D. "FDA's animal feed regulations provide a firewall against BSE, and we are committed to strictly enforcing the rules that protect Americans from this disease."
www.fda.gov...

In the end though, yes...there will be massive media blowup on this no doubt.



posted on Dec, 24 2003 @ 10:45 AM
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Did you find any information on the length of time for incubation in humans? The BBC said 30 years, but I just thought being that you are in that industry you might know for sure.

-P


Originally posted by ZeddicusZulZorander
Well all, I have done my homework and Mrs. Zedd just happens to work for a biomedical firm that makes the most accurate and fastest BSE test equipment on the market. Here some good info for you...

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy is the clinical name, referred to as BSE. Also known as Mad Cow and as John Titor called it in his "predictions"...Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease. The transmissible agent is neither a virus nor other previously known infectious agent, but rather an unconventional agent consisting of protein. This newly-discovered pathogen is called a "prion", short for " proteinaceous infectious particle". Prions are thought to transform normal, benign protein molecules into infectious, deadly ones by altering the shape of the healthy molecules to the dangerous conformation. This transformation then induces a chain reaction to alter the shape of the other benign protein molecules into the deadly form. The suspected prion diseases occurring in animals consist of: scrapie in sheep and goats; transmissible mink encephalopathy; chronic wasting disease of mule deer and elk; feline spongiform encephalopathy; and, bovine spongiform encephalopathy ("BSE"), also known as "mad cow disease". TSEs have also been found in some exotic zoo animals.

In the United Kingdom, scientists have ascertained a likely connection between bovine spongiform encephalopathy ("BSE") and CJD. BSE or "mad cow disease" was initially discovered in the United Kingdom in 1986 and thought to have resulted from the use of cattle feed containing contaminated meat and bone meal made from scrapie-infected sheep and/or TSE-infected cattle. The original outbreak was then probably magnified by subsequently feeding meat and bone meal from BSE-infected cows to young calves.

The FDA does have a contingency plan and here is a link for those interested.
www.fda.gov...

And more BSE info you can read at:
www.fda.gov...

I also bet this article slipped by most of you about feed used at a Texas feedlot that was suspected of containing meat and bone meal from other domestic cattle....the prime method of starting BSE. This is most likely the cause in this new case.
www.fda.gov...

What about protecting you beloved pets?
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has learned from the government of Canada that rendered material from a Canadian cow that last week tested positive for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, also known as mad cow disease) may have been used to manufacture pet food, specifically dry dog food, some of which was reported to have been shipped to the United States. The Canadian government prevented the BSE positive cow from being processed for human food. Therefore, consumers can be assured that their food does not contain any remnants of the BSE positive cow. It is also important to stress that there is no scientific evidence to date that dogs can contract BSE or any similar disease. In addition there is no evidence that dogs can transmit the disease to humans.
www.fda.gov...

Well, even though we are not to be using those type of "transmission" feeds, the disease turns up in Washington State. Well, what about this? The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today announced the filing of a Consent Decree of Permanent Injunction against X-Cel, Feeds Inc., and individual officers based on violations of the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. In the Consent Decree, the Firm and officers admitted liability for introducing adulterated and misbranded animal feeds into interstate commerce and agreed to implement measures to correct the violations under FDA's supervision. X-Cel, a feed manufacturer headquartered in Tacoma, Washington, failed to comply with FDA regulations (the 1997 Animal Feed Rule) designed to prevent the establishment and spread of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE, also known as "Mad Cow Disease") should it ever be found in the United States and FDA regulations concerning the manufacture of medicated feeds. "No case of BSE has ever been documented in the U.S., despite aggressive surveillance, said FDA Commissioner Mark B. McClellan, M.D., Ph.D. "FDA's animal feed regulations provide a firewall against BSE, and we are committed to strictly enforcing the rules that protect Americans from this disease."
www.fda.gov...

In the end though, yes...there will be massive media blowup on this no doubt.




posted on Dec, 24 2003 @ 10:49 AM
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Well, even though we are not to be using those type of "transmission" feeds, the disease turns up in Washington State. Well, what about this? The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today announced the filing of a Consent Decree of Permanent Injunction against X-Cel, Feeds Inc., and individual officers based on violations of the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. In the Consent Decree, the Firm and officers admitted liability for introducing adulterated and misbranded animal feeds into interstate commerce and agreed to implement measures to correct the violations under FDA's supervision. X-Cel, a feed manufacturer headquartered in Tacoma, Washington, failed to comply with FDA regulations (the 1997 Animal Feed Rule) designed to prevent the establishment and spread of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE, also known as "Mad Cow Disease") should it ever be found in the United States and FDA regulations concerning the manufacture of medicated feeds. "No case of BSE has ever been documented in the U.S., despite aggressive surveillance, said FDA Commissioner Mark B. McClellan, M.D., Ph.D. "FDA's animal feed regulations provide a firewall against BSE, and we are committed to strictly enforcing the rules that protect Americans from this disease."


Wow, all that to make an extra buck.



posted on Dec, 24 2003 @ 11:16 AM
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Originally posted by postings
Did you find any information on the length of time for incubation in humans? The BBC said 30 years, but I just thought being that you are in that industry you might know for sure.

-P


Sure Posting. BSE can be readily transmitted to mice with most, if not all, inoculated animals succumbing to disease on primary passage (a high "attack rate"). This relatively modest species barrier has been formally measured by comparative titration studies of the same BSE isolate by intracerebral inoculation into cattle and mice. It indicates an approximately 1000-fold barrier (i.e. it takes 1000 times more BSE to kill a mouse than a cow) (Wells et al 1998). The effect of this barrier on incubation periods is to increase mean incubation periods by approximately threefold and to dramatically increase the range of incubation periods seen.

Such experiments are usually performed using the most efficient, intracerebral, route of transmission. A formal titration of BSE in mice to determine an oral LD 50 has not been reported. [LD50 means the dose at which 50% of the subjects die] However, oral challenge with approximately 10 g of BSE-affected cow brain killed the majority of exposed mice (Barlow & Middleton 1990). If the bovine-to-human species barrier were similar to that for mice, it would suggest an oral LD 50 in humans of an order of magnitude also similar to that for mice (approximately 10 g). Clearly, it is hoped that the species barrier limiting transmission of BSE to humans will be of a far higher order. However, if we assume a pessimistic scenario, that the barrier is similar (and it remains possible it could be lower), extrapolation with the known incubation periods in the acquired human prion diseases, such as growth hormone-related iatrogenic CJD or kuru, where transmission does not involve a species barrier (and mean incubation periods are approximately 10-15 years), would suggest mean incubation periods of BSE in humans of perhaps 30 years or more, and a range extending from 10 years to, or exceeding, a normal human lifespan. Such estimations (Collinge 1999), based on extensive experience of transmission studies across species from many research groups over several decades, suggest-only 4 years after recognition of vCJD- the need for caution with respect to optimistic assessments of likely human BSE epidemic size.



posted on Dec, 24 2003 @ 11:28 AM
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NOT a terrorist attack...

BUT

Maybe it is a EU attack on the US? The French and German don't feel sympathy to the States, so are most other EU countries.



posted on Dec, 24 2003 @ 11:33 AM
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dunno if this has been mentioned but ive just read that
johntitor.com... website and one of his statements is:

62. The "Mad Cow" story here is yet to begin but don't worry, the fruited gelatin deserts are safe

he refers to here as the US........

and besides CDJ has been around in the UK for years, your more likely to win a few million on the lottery than to get CJD

sorry if this has already been mentioned

[Edited on 24-12-2003 by cleggy]



posted on Dec, 24 2003 @ 11:36 AM
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Originally posted by Johnny
NOT a terrorist attack...

BUT

Maybe it is a EU attack on the US? The French and German don't feel sympathy to the States, so are most other EU countries.


Nobody in europe hate Canada and we got this problem too, So I don't think that europe is behind this.

[Edited on 24-12-2003 by Salem]



posted on Dec, 24 2003 @ 11:48 AM
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US sales of Chick-fil-a will continue to grow exponentially, even if The Richards Group (famous for The Mad Cow - Eat Mor Chikin campaign) is forced to pull the award winning advertising.

If you are NOT in the US, see examples of the horrendous plight of those affected in other countires being made fun of for advertising purposes here:
www.chick-fil-a.com...

If you don't know (and why would anyone) the Atlanta based company of Chick-fil-a is HARD CORE fundamentalist Christian, closed Sunday's and fires executive non-believers and other hired consultants.

(Guess what MY BEEF with Chick-fil-a is?)



posted on Dec, 24 2003 @ 03:13 PM
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Originally posted by ZeddicusZulZorander

Sure Posting. BSE can be readily transmitted to mice with most, if not all, inoculated animals succumbing to disease on primary passage (a high "attack rate"). This relatively modest species barrier has been formally measured by comparative titration studies of the same BSE isolate by intracerebral inoculation into cattle and mice. It indicates an approximately 1000-fold barrier (i.e. it takes 1000 times more BSE to kill a mouse than a cow) (Wells et al 1998). The effect of this barrier on incubation periods is to increase mean incubation periods by approximately threefold and to dramatically increase the range of incubation periods seen.

Such experiments are usually performed using the most efficient, intracerebral, route of transmission. A formal titration of BSE in mice to determine an oral LD 50 has not been reported. [LD50 means the dose at which 50% of the subjects die] However, oral challenge with approximately 10 g of BSE-affected cow brain killed the majority of exposed mice (Barlow & Middleton 1990). If the bovine-to-human species barrier were similar to that for mice, it would suggest an oral LD 50 in humans of an order of magnitude also similar to that for mice (approximately 10 g). Clearly, it is hoped that the species barrier limiting transmission of BSE to humans will be of a far higher order. However, if we assume a pessimistic scenario, that the barrier is similar (and it remains possible it could be lower), extrapolation with the known incubation periods in the acquired human prion diseases, such as growth hormone-related iatrogenic CJD or kuru, where transmission does not involve a species barrier (and mean incubation periods are approximately 10-15 years), would suggest mean incubation periods of BSE in humans of perhaps 30 years or more, and a range extending from 10 years to, or exceeding, a normal human lifespan. Such estimations (Collinge 1999), based on extensive experience of transmission studies across species from many research groups over several decades, suggest-only 4 years after recognition of vCJD- the need for caution with respect to optimistic assessments of likely human BSE epidemic size.


Did I understand that the study you mentioned (Collinge 1999) was only a 4 year study? If that is true you are basically saying that there isn't enough research available to concretely say how the disease spreads right? Just wanna be sure I understand. Interesting that you mention that certain cases would not show up until close to the end of the 'life span' of normal humans. If that is true, we don't have much to worry about right? Also, I wonder how old the people are who have already died from it? If they are pretty old, that indicated the disease has been around undiagnosed for quite some time, unless they all had some genetic anomaly that caused symptoms to present themeselves early. If some are pretty young, I am not sure what to believe.

-P



posted on Dec, 24 2003 @ 03:22 PM
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Originally posted by Johnny
NOT a terrorist attack...

BUT

Maybe it is a EU attack on the US? The French and German don't feel sympathy to the States, so are most other EU countries.


Especially my country is famous for it's secret special operations affecting the worlds political order and economy.

Not?



posted on Dec, 25 2003 @ 10:46 PM
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You can bet that this will take the same sort of course it took in Britain and Europe.

First there is a giant cover-up to protect big business and the livestock industry. Politicians will be saying publicly how terrible it is and how everything possible is being done. Behind the scenes whistle blowers are being threatened, files shredded and so on.

The most important thing is to keep big business and political donations intact. The general public, who cares ?

Cigarettes do not cause lung cancer. There is no such thing as Gulf War Syndrome. Beef is completely safe. The government cares about public health. Trust me....



posted on Dec, 26 2003 @ 03:07 AM
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Originally posted by Dmsoldier
1 cow? out of the gizilens? and they make biggg deal out of it?


am i missing somthing or is this virus or whatever spredlike wildfire?? or are they just nuts? [/quote

they didnt test every cow. that one cow represents a percentage





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