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Zen philosphy

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posted on Mar, 10 2007 @ 07:31 PM
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Ryokan, a Zen master, lived the simplest kind of life in a little hut at the foot of a mountain. One evening a thief visited the hut only to discover there was nothing to steal.

Ryokan returned and caught him. "You have come a long way to visit me," he told the prowler, "and you should not return empty-handed. Please take my clothes as a gift."

The thief was bewildered. He took the clothes and slunk away.

Ryoken sat naked, watching the moon. "Poor fellow," he mused, "I wish I could have given him this beautiful moon."





The Zen master Hakuin was praised by his neighbours as one living a pure life.

A beautiful Japanese girl whose parents owned a food store lived near him. Suddenly, without any warning, her parents discovered she was with child.

This made her parents angry. She would not confess who the man was, but after much harassment at last named Hakuin.

In great anger the parent went to the master. "Is that so?" was all he would say.

After the child was born it was brought to Hakuin. By this time he had lost his reputation, which did not trouble him, but he took very good care of the child. He obtained milk from his neighbours and everything else he needed.

A year later the girl-mother could stand it no longer. She told her parents the truth - the real father of the child was a young man who worked in the fishmarket.

The mother and father of the girl at once went to Hakuin to ask forgiveness, to apologize at length, and to get the child back.

Hakuin was willing. In yielding the child, all he said was: "Is that so?"


www.rider.edu...
www.ashidakim.com...

Some Zen stories.This kind of stories should be taught in schools, they are more useful than whatever stories about how to "be successful" they teach now. In my view schools only enforce the worker-consumer mindset, useful to the corporations and the way they want people to think about the world

[edit on 10-3-2007 by pai mei]




posted on Mar, 10 2007 @ 07:45 PM
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This may or may not be a Zen mind-set. I like to think it is.

When a co-worker says " It's Friday" !
I reply, "yes. only two more days till Monday". And I smile.

Btw, I'm serious. I love my profession and view it as getting paid for doing a hobby.

Lex



posted on Mar, 10 2007 @ 07:54 PM
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Originally posted by pai mei
Some Zen stories.This kind of stories should be taught in schools, they are more useful than whatever stories about how to "be successful" they teach now. In my view schools only enforce the worker-consumer mindset, useful to the corporations and the way they want people to think about the world

[edit on 10-3-2007 by pai mei]


Oh yeah, with out a doubt. Idealism from philosophical greats should be taught at a young age especially.

Perception would increase alot which only leads to an enlightened society.






posted on Mar, 10 2007 @ 08:04 PM
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Originally posted by pai mei
ries.This kind of stories should be taught in schools, they are more useful than whatever stories about how to "be successful" they teach now.


I tend to agree with you. the only caveat I would say is that many Zen/Taoist/Bhuddist teachings require a degree of life experience to fully understand. If taught too young, kids may get the wrong idea, see it as so much bunkum, and be turned off the teachings permanently.... still there must certainly be ways of introducing the concepts at a young age. worth thinking about. I wouldn't hold out too much hope though... since, as you say..


schools only enforce the worker-consumer mindset, useful to the corporations and the way they want people to think about the world


.. which I would have to agree with.



posted on Mar, 10 2007 @ 08:11 PM
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In high school Zen stories would be very good. Not Zen practice, that is for whoever wants it personally, but these stories are good to know.

Imagine a world where everybody lives the Zen way



posted on Mar, 10 2007 @ 08:15 PM
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DP


[edit on 10-3-2007 by Selmer2]



posted on Mar, 10 2007 @ 08:16 PM
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Originally posted by Selmer2
In high school Zen stories would be very good. Not Zen practice, that is for whoever wants it personally, but these stories are good to know.

Imagine a world where everybody lives the Zen way


Im also thinking 3rd year of school or even 2nd year of zen adapted stories with animals and appropriate language.

Im not thinking lets drill it into them, but maybe a few story times,

basically animal fables (moral stories).

What do you people think?

edit: posted incorrectly

[edit on 10-3-2007 by Selmer2]



posted on Mar, 10 2007 @ 08:17 PM
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My dad read me Dr. Doolittle, before I could read.
I still have and cherish the same book he read from.

Selmer2, is this what you are asking ?

Lex



posted on Mar, 10 2007 @ 08:18 PM
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Originally posted by Lexion
My dad read me Dr. Doolittle, before I could read.
I still have and cherish the same book he read from.

Selmer2, is this what you are asking ?

Lex


yeah, stuff like that



posted on Mar, 10 2007 @ 08:22 PM
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Be still like the mountain while flowing like the river, Grasshopper. Zen and Taoist teachings can begin as soon as a child can speak, sometimes even earlier. If you have not had the pleasure yet, I encourage you to read "The Tao of Pooh" by Benjamine Hoff. It is a great introduction to taoist philosophy for anyone familiar with Winnie the Pooh. A good book for child and adult alike although it is pitched more at adults.

Great truths know no age limits.



posted on Mar, 10 2007 @ 08:25 PM
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I feel ya Terapin


www.aesopfables.com...

These are the things im thinking about for 1st graders but adapted with concise, appropriate language.



posted on Mar, 10 2007 @ 08:28 PM
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I think Zen teaching requires a Zen master, not just any teacher


But the stories are simple and I think it would be good for students to read them.
I would like to see the entire school proces changed and the "values" it teaches changed also. In fact I would like to see the entire world change

For now I think it would be good these stories made their way into schools, I think the children should be at least 12 years old when they hear about them in school.
Nothing imposed, just some presentation of some stories and who likes them will read more for himself
Sure they will not understand them all. I think they are simple enough not to be changed. Some are hard to understand on purpose :
"What is the sound of one hand clapping ?"



posted on Mar, 10 2007 @ 08:29 PM
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Silence, is golden.

Lex



posted on Mar, 11 2007 @ 07:05 AM
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Terapin, yes "Great truths know no age limits". But in school Zen cannot be treated like everything else, the teacher must be into it, and if that happens the entire school system and values of our society will change.

Hard to believe that will happen, that is why I say that in schools these Zen stories must be taught when the kids have grown up a bit, let's say when they in 7th grade, and can read more stories for themselves if they are interested, because it's very possible that the teacher will treat Zen as any other matter he has to teach.
Maybe I am wrong about the school, I think about my own experience with it
Just the presence of these stories is good, letting people know that other ways of thinking and living exist.
I look at some philosophers, like Nietzche, I am sure he did not know about Zen, it would have solved all the existential problems he had




[edit on 11-3-2007 by pai mei]



posted on Mar, 11 2007 @ 10:21 AM
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That's a great link pai mei, thanks. Jesus' parables were like zen stories.

I like the one on concentration, gonna to take some time to read through them all.



posted on Mar, 11 2007 @ 05:35 PM
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Love this one:


A student went to his meditation teacher and said, "My meditation is horrible! I feel so distracted, or my legs ache, or I'm constantly falling asleep. It's just horrible!"
"It will pass," the teacher said matter-of-factly.

A week later, the student came back to his teacher. "My meditation is wonderful! I feel so aware, so peaceful, so alive! It's just wonderful!'

"It will pass," the teacher replied matter-of-factly.

Here are some more:
www.ashidakim.com...

But - for kids!?
"Sound od one hand clapping" is the most famous example of breaking down conventional knowledge to obtain no-mind via koans. Little difficult for kids...and many others.


"What is Zen?

The Monk Mayo asked this question of the Sixth patriarch:
?What is Zen?? the Patriarch replied that, ? when your mind
is not dwelling on the dualism of good and evil, what is
your original face before you were born?"



Love this thread do



posted on Mar, 11 2007 @ 06:42 PM
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Blue,
Love the link. Added it to my favorites.

Thanks,
Lex



posted on Mar, 11 2007 @ 07:18 PM
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I think Zen teaching requires a Zen master.


Yes it does - good thing I know a Zen Master!
Zen is very useful in Life.



"Not Far From Buddhahood

A university student while visiting Gasan asked him: "Have you even read the Christian Bible?"

"No, read it to me," said Gasan.

The student opened the Bible and read from St. Matthew: "And why take ye thought for raiment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow. They toil not, neither do they spin, and yet I say unto you that even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these...Take therefore no thought for the morrow, for the morrow shall take thought for the things of itself."

Gasan said: "Whoever uttered those words I consider an Enlightened man."

The student continued reading: "Ask and it shall be given you, seek and ye shall find, knock and it shall be opened unto you. For everyone that asketh receiveth and he that seeketh findeth and to him that knocketh, it shall be opened."

Gasan remarked: "That is excellent. Whoever said that is not far from Buddhahood."


[edit on 11-3-2007 by Seraphim_Serpente]



posted on Mar, 11 2007 @ 07:22 PM
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If this were taught in schools, would this not vilate the seperation of church and state that secularists hold so dear? secularism is a two lane road. There is a little zen for you.



posted on Mar, 11 2007 @ 09:09 PM
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As long as the government doesn't establish Buddhism as the official religion of the USA, it wouldn't violate the constitution. Besides isn't Buddhism a "way of life" rather than a religion?

My favorite sayings are "Those who know the least, know it the loudest." And the buddhist parable about luck:

A farmer's horse runs away and his neighbor says "wow bad luck." And the farmer basically doens't see it as bad or good. Then the horse comes back with several wild horses. And the neighbor says "wow that's some good luck." And again the farmer is indifferent. Then the farmer's son breaks his leg trying to tame the wild horses. "Bad luck" says he neighbor. But then the army comes around for conscriptions and the son is passed over because of his injury. "That's lucky says the neighbor."

There's some good ones in movies too, like the Matrix; Morpheus (god of dreams by the way) sees his ship exploding. "I had a dream, and now that dream is gone from me." All things are fleeting, and life is just an illusion, is the main idea here.



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