Freemasons recruiting commercial question

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posted on Mar, 11 2007 @ 01:43 PM
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Originally posted by Masonic Light
If I ever decided to leave Masonry, it certainly wouldn't be for any of the reasons the anti-Masons on here constantly harp about. Instead it would be because of the commercialization and McDonaldization of Masonry from the Masons themselves.

One day classes, 2B1Ask1, Nascar (in the Scottish Rite no less!). Stuff like this mirrors the desire of many in Masonic leadership these days to turn the fraternity into just another social club without any deeper meaning than the opportunity to get out of the house a couple of timer per month.

If I wanted to be in a social club, I would have joined Rotary.



There is little resemblence between the modern Lodge and the Lodge of my father and grandfather. Declining membership had resulted in extremely lax standards for entry and, as a result, Lodge meetings more resembled boys night out. At the time I left most of my brethren didn't know or care one whit about the history, philosophy, ideals, and ethics of this once noble organization. We have come a long way from the days when these very ideals forged a nation.

If only the ANTIs knew just how ineffectual and powerless Freemasonry has become.

Freemasonry is dying. I mourn the loss.




posted on Mar, 11 2007 @ 02:06 PM
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Originally posted by befoiled

Originally posted by Masonic Light
If I ever decided to leave Masonry, it certainly wouldn't be for any of the reasons the anti-Masons on here constantly harp about. Instead it would be because of the commercialization and McDonaldization of Masonry from the Masons themselves.

One day classes, 2B1Ask1, Nascar (in the Scottish Rite no less!). Stuff like this mirrors the desire of many in Masonic leadership these days to turn the fraternity into just another social club without any deeper meaning than the opportunity to get out of the house a couple of timer per month.

If I wanted to be in a social club, I would have joined Rotary.



There is little resemblence between the modern Lodge and the Lodge of my father and grandfather. Declining membership had resulted in extremely lax standards for entry and, as a result, Lodge meetings more resembled boys night out. At the time I left most of my brethren didn't know or care one whit about the history, philosophy, ideals, and ethics of this once noble organization. We have come a long way from the days when these very ideals forged a nation.

If only the ANTIs knew just how ineffectual and powerless Freemasonry has become.

Freemasonry is dying. I mourn the loss.


Unfortunately, I sort of agree. Whether this is temporary or permanent is impossible to tell.

It is important to note, however, that this decline is NOT as the anti-Masons would want. After all, true Masonic philosophy isn't dying out at all outside the Lodges. More and more people are becoming interested in the esoteric and in mysticism. The point here is that one can become much familiar with such things these days by sitting down with a few good books, instead of joining a Lodge an going through the degrees. Today, even the fraternity's highest leadership have absolutely no idea of what Masonic symbolism means, or even what its philosophy is. In far too many cases, it is simply the blind leading the blind.

In complete honesty, I too would have probably left Masonry already were it not for the close friends I've made in the fraternity. In fact, I almost did when the revised Scottish Rite ritual was released, and this is something that still bears heavily on my conscience.

As mentioned, true Masonic philosophy isn't dying out at all...except maybe in the Lodges.



posted on Mar, 11 2007 @ 02:10 PM
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Originally posted by KilgoreTrout
Just a point I noticed when looking into the charitable work that masons do which I think is applicable here. I only studied the annual accounts in Britain so i would be grateful to know if it is different in the US - but I was surprised about how little of the money that was raised goes to youth programmes - in the UK health, respite care and elderly programmes seemed to be the mainstay. I found this a bit unfortunate.

For me, it makes sense that investment in the young is investment in all our futures. It would also seem to be an important means of disseminating your message - which is a good one - to the very people you hope one day to welcome into your lodges. Young males in particular are becoming marginalised in our societies. There are fewer positive male role models than ever before and it seems to me that the masons could and perhaps should help to fill that gap.

As I said i don't know what charitable works your individual lodges do but I would be interested in your thoughts on this.


While youth progams are noble, in the US most Masonic charity goes to medical concerns. The Shriners have burn centers and children's orthopedic hospitals; the Scottish Rite has it's childhood language disorder clinics, and the York Rite has the Knight Templar Eye Foundation, which pays for various eye surgeries for the underprivileged elderly.

Individual Lodges however, usually support their own charities, which can include various youth programs.



posted on Mar, 11 2007 @ 02:17 PM
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Originally posted by Masonic Light
Unfortunately, I sort of agree. Whether this is temporary or permanent is impossible to tell.

It is important to note, however, that this decline is NOT as the anti-Masons would want. After all, true Masonic philosophy isn't dying out at all outside the Lodges. More and more people are becoming interested in the esoteric and in mysticism. The point here is that one can become much familiar with such things these days by sitting down with a few good books, instead of joining a Lodge an going through the degrees. Today, even the fraternity's highest leadership have absolutely no idea of what Masonic symbolism means, or even what its philosophy is. In far too many cases, it is simply the blind leading the blind.

In complete honesty, I too would have probably left Masonry already were it not for the close friends I've made in the fraternity. In fact, I almost did when the revised Scottish Rite ritual was released, and this is something that still bears heavily on my conscience.

As mentioned, true Masonic philosophy isn't dying out at all...except maybe in the Lodges.


One of my friends left the same time I did. I was, at the time, JW and he was SS. Both of us were also active in the York Rite. But witnessing the steady decline of craft - and being powerless to stop it - simply became too painful.

I agree that the philosophy is written in one's heart and I still reread some of the works of Masonic authors. Perhaps some day there will be a movement back to its roots.



posted on Mar, 11 2007 @ 02:18 PM
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Originally posted by befoiled
There is little resemblence between the modern Lodge and the Lodge of my father and grandfather.

If only the ANTIs knew just how ineffectual and powerless Freemasonry has become.

Freemasonry is dying.


Masons are just a bunch of has beens who have sold out to the world governing system.

[edit on 11-3-2007 by In nothing we trust]



posted on Mar, 11 2007 @ 03:04 PM
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Originally posted by In nothing we trust
Masons are just a bunch of has beens who have sold out to the world governing system.


ROFLMAO!

Thanks for the chuckle INWT. You really are bitter aren't you?

Can you say "sour grapes" boys and girls?

bwahahahahahahahahahaha!



posted on Mar, 11 2007 @ 04:30 PM
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Rockpuck, that was interesting about the causes they give to in Ohio. I
can tell you in Mass Grand Lodge started what is called the Masonic
Angel Fund for Children. Many lodges here have it now. In this Angel Fund
we supply clothing for any child in need. For example, if a child walks in
to a school in the early part of winter, and they are freezing there tails
off wearing summer clothing, a school nurse or guidence officer will pull
that student aside, get their clothing sizes, and call the chairman of the
angle fund from that local lodge. Our guide lines state that the call for
benevolence must be returned with in 24 hours. We then go out with the
check books and buy the clothing that the school system told us was
needed. We drop it off at the school. We have no contact with the child
what so ever. Only the people that work at the school do. Every body is
happy, and the child is warm again



posted on Mar, 12 2007 @ 01:08 AM
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Originally posted by Masonic Light

Originally posted by befoiled

Originally posted by Masonic Light
If I ever decided to leave Masonry, it certainly wouldn't be for any of the reasons the anti-Masons on here constantly harp about. Instead it would be because of the commercialization and McDonaldization of Masonry from the Masons themselves.

One day classes, 2B1Ask1, Nascar (in the Scottish Rite no less!). Stuff like this mirrors the desire of many in Masonic leadership these days to turn the fraternity into just another social club without any deeper meaning than the opportunity to get out of the house a couple of timer per month.

If I wanted to be in a social club, I would have joined Rotary.



There is little resemblence between the modern Lodge and the Lodge of my father and grandfather. Declining membership had resulted in extremely lax standards for entry and, as a result, Lodge meetings more resembled boys night out. At the time I left most of my brethren didn't know or care one whit about the history, philosophy, ideals, and ethics of this once noble organization. We have come a long way from the days when these very ideals forged a nation.

If only the ANTIs knew just how ineffectual and powerless Freemasonry has become.

Freemasonry is dying. I mourn the loss.


Unfortunately, I sort of agree. Whether this is temporary or permanent is impossible to tell.

It is important to note, however, that this decline is NOT as the anti-Masons would want. After all, true Masonic philosophy isn't dying out at all outside the Lodges. More and more people are becoming interested in the esoteric and in mysticism. The point here is that one can become much familiar with such things these days by sitting down with a few good books, instead of joining a Lodge an going through the degrees. Today, even the fraternity's highest leadership have absolutely no idea of what Masonic symbolism means, or even what its philosophy is. In far too many cases, it is simply the blind leading the blind.

In complete honesty, I too would have probably left Masonry already were it not for the close friends I've made in the fraternity. In fact, I almost did when the revised Scottish Rite ritual was released, and this is something that still bears heavily on my conscience.

As mentioned, true Masonic philosophy isn't dying out at all...except maybe in the Lodges.


Whilst I am only young, and have only been a member for a under a year, from what my father has told me, here in Australia, membership quality has not changed as you fellows claim it has in America.

I can only imagine how much the Brothers in my lodge would laugh or cringe at the idea of advertising for members, perhaps I'm fortunate, but my lodge is highly enthusiastic when it comes to the history, philosophy, ideals, and ethics of this STILL noble organization.

Whilst I will readily admit that here the average age for Brethren is probably around 70, the younger members that I know are great people, and highly enthusiastic.

To be honest, I was shocked when I read that in the US you can take a day class, and become a Master Mason in one day! Then I learned that you guys can take a weekend getaway, and go through the entire 32 degrees of the Ancient and Accepted Rite.

This is not the case in Australia at all, it takes up to a year, usually 8-10 months to go through the 3 Craft degrees, and then, you must remain a Mason in good standing for over a year before you are invited to join any appendant bodies, and these additional degrees have to be really worked for, if you so wish to strive towards them.

Inviting as it may seem, I would not wish to go through the entire degree system in one day, or a weekend, because there is SO much to learn, and a person does not change themselves for the better overnight, it takes a lifelong journey to improve ones being, and in my opinion, this is what Freemasonry is actually about.

Making Good Men Better.



posted on Mar, 12 2007 @ 01:17 AM
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Originally posted by Masonic Light

... true Masonic philosophy isn't dying out at all outside the Lodges. More and more people are becoming interested in the esoteric and in mysticism.

... Today, even the fraternity's highest leadership have absolutely no idea of what Masonic symbolism means, or even what its philosophy is. In far too many cases, it is simply the blind leading the blind.

As mentioned, true Masonic philosophy isn't dying out at all...except maybe in the Lodges.


You said it.

Don't you feel better now.


[edit on 12-3-2007 by In nothing we trust]



posted on Mar, 12 2007 @ 02:49 PM
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Originally posted by In nothing we trust


You said it.

Don't you feel better now.




Actually, I've lamented over it for a long time. You can no doubt find me bitching about it on threads a couple of years old if you run a search.




posted on Mar, 12 2007 @ 10:41 PM
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Masonic light, I can see a few instances of your "blind leading the blind", but I think, here in my district, anyway, there are still many good masons who truly live and believe in the craft and what it means to be a mason. But maybe I'm still blind. I was raised only about 6 years ago.

To justify; My grandpa and dad are masons, I was taught what it means to be a GOOD MAN a very long time before I was taught to be a good mason, if that makes sense. Also, Our lodge is very small, but several PM's, my officers (mostly PM's) and myself are working very hard to maitain it, and are prepared to deal with a merge or simply closing before we ever recruit for the sake of numbers to pay the bills.


The One day class in ohio sucks, at best. If the guys that went it that way stayed, we could still work them as pro tem candidates to give them an outlet to soak in the fraternity. Problem is, a huge amount of them never return to lodge and are lost (for us, so far) for NPD. The few left are mostly "ring masons". We have sent 20 or so the the oneday classes, there is only one who comes to meetings, and is my SW. Cudos to him for that, but he is poor with the ritual, and I'll probly end up picking up the ball he drops for next year.


As far as "i dont have time">>> Grandpa drove a service truck and kept sohio car washes running all over the state when he was in the chairs, he made the time. Dad was active thru the 80's, gave many lectures & charges, but ok, I'll buy "no time" for him now, he works 2nd shift. I drive a service thruck, repairing construction equipment all over the state, I dont know when I'll get home untill I get there, still work with Scouting, a director for a loacal Steam & tractor show, and live an hour from the lodge, but yet have managed to be the master and had a very good inspection last week. In the cold months, I only see the house in the daylight on the weekends, and my wife and toddler son are in bed when I leave, and often back to sleep by the time I'm home at night. Lukily sweetie is forgiving and supporting, even encourages my role in masonry, as she also comes from a very masonic family. If I have the time for masonry, annyone who works a day job, or even a 3rd shift has the time for masonry.



Sorry if it looks like a rant, but a good thread that has invoked alot of thought, I wanted to share some.



posted on Mar, 12 2007 @ 11:57 PM
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Dieselboy, Nice to see so many fellow Masons from Ohio, I have been in contact with three others so far.

As far as the job goes working second shift and never having time, I go to a morning lodge, named Solar lodge for it being in the day.. meetings at 9am and almost every person is a second shift worker. It was founded for the workers at NCR, GM, Delphi and such, second shift factory workers mostly. I agree with you on every thing though, as I don't know how many solar lodge type lodges there are out there..



posted on Mar, 13 2007 @ 03:56 AM
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"
Remember this; the masons are just a pass through front organization.

Kind of like how the columbian cocain cartel is a front for the CIA. "

So true.



posted on Mar, 13 2007 @ 07:18 AM
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Originally posted by Tokyo Rose
"
Remember this; the masons are just a pass through front organization.



A pass through organization for what?

My major gripe is that, for the most part, Masonry has become a hot dog club where guys can gather round, drink coffee, and talk about baseball. If it's a pass through organization for anything, it would have to be Boring, Inc.




posted on Mar, 13 2007 @ 01:47 PM
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Masonic Light you just simply do not understand..

You see, you as a Mason have no idea what Masonry is, only none Masons know what Masonry is.

That is why us lowly Masons that have not reached the 666.5th degree know nothing about anything because we are mere puppets being used by the .. er.. elite. We need to take more enlightenment from none Masons about what Masonry really is, as being a member means we have no idea. Pure logic.



posted on Mar, 14 2007 @ 01:03 AM
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Originally posted by Masonic Light
A pass through organization for what?


The Reptiloid Unified Brotherhood of Baphomet’s Interdimensional Soldiers of Hell...

...or R.U.B.B.I.S.H, for short.



posted on Mar, 15 2007 @ 01:09 AM
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Originally posted by Masonic Light

Originally posted by Tokyo Rose
"
Remember this; the masons are just a pass through front organization.



A pass through organization for what?

My major gripe is that, for the most part, Masonry has become a hot dog club where guys can gather round, drink coffee, and talk about baseball. If it's a pass through organization for anything, it would have to be Boring, Inc.



I'm sorry ML, but it is my pleasure in this case to disagree with you. I cannot speak for the United States, but here in Australia, I have had no experiences like that whatsoever. Maybe I'm fortunate to have a really good Lodge, but all the ones I have visited have yielded me a similar perspective.



posted on Mar, 19 2007 @ 01:16 PM
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Well this may be one of the few legitimate differences in Prince Hall Masonry and the rest.
1. Advertising ? - Never had it and never will, we still hold fast to the Landmarks and Masonic Constituion

2. One Day Classes ? - Again, that will never happen in P.H.A How can one honestly say that the candidate has made suitable proficiency in the preceeding degree, if got the preceeding degree 5 minute ago ? To advance from EA to MM my lodge takes a minimum of 3 to 6 months, dependant upon class size & ritualistic proficiency of the candidates.

3. Longevity - It is my belief that due to the preeminent position of PHA in the African American family and community structure, that is the reason that we never have a shortage of new and eager recruits. In our community it has always been a badge of honor and respect, never scoffed at by the huddled masses of ignorami who insist upon denigrating an institution that has only served to uplift our community



posted on Mar, 19 2007 @ 01:41 PM
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I'm quitting Masonry to join the Rotary.

I heard they have cool handshakes



posted on Mar, 20 2007 @ 10:13 PM
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Originally posted by Rockpuck
.... I go to a morning lodge, named Solar lodge for it being in the day.. meetings at 9am ....


I've herd of the solar lodges, thas so ironic, though. Ours is one of the last lunar lodges in the state. If your keen on masonic history, this used to rather common. Not because 2/3 of our meetings are after dark, but we actually meet by the moon>>> thursday on or before the full moon and 2 weeks thereafter. We have a rich heritage and even if dad works thru our meetings, he is still proud to be a member of our lodge.





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