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So You Hate Cops

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posted on Mar, 21 2007 @ 06:36 AM
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Ok, if its made for TV, its ok I guess.

I'd edit my reply, but I can't, so if any mods are around, remove the link to the clip I posted and my comments on it.




posted on Mar, 21 2007 @ 07:24 AM
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Originally posted by thematrix
I'd edit my reply, but I can't, so if any mods are around, remove the link to the clip I posted and my comments on it.


The link in your previous post?



posted on Mar, 21 2007 @ 07:36 AM
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I don't hate cops... I have never hated cops... they should have just pulled over the other guy.



posted on Mar, 21 2007 @ 08:21 AM
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Originally posted by chissler

Originally posted by thematrix
I'd edit my reply, but I can't, so if any mods are around, remove the link to the clip I posted and my comments on it.


The link in your previous post?


Yup, some guys noted that its a clip from some sketch show on TV.

Goto say, its well done :@



posted on Mar, 21 2007 @ 09:49 AM
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Originally posted by jsobecky
No, it doesn't make sense. You have a better understanding with gangs than you do with police, even tho gangs have hurt you and the police have treated you well.

Gang-members, on occassion, have "treated me well" too (as in not being violent towards me) so it's about equal. Also, when people live in your neighborhood you tend to develop an understanding with them, if you know what I mean. You stay out of my way, I'll stay out of yours. No matter what colors they wear.

Cops don't live around here, so I don't get that same opportunity to see them around the neighborhood at the local bar or the supermarket or whatever.



Furthermore, you are not sensitive to police being called pigs, even though they have come to your aid.

I'm just like, so what? There are so many other important things for them to worry about; I would think being called a 'pig' would be the least of their concerns.




It sounds like you have more respect for punks... than you do for police.

No, they have more respect for me. They're not gonna rob me; we grew up together. The police, OTOH, have no such allegiance to me, or the people in my community.



(and please, stop it with the 'means something different' stuff - a punk is a punk)

What do you mean with "stop it"?


As far as I know, this is the first time I've said that. I was referring to the fact that, when you say 'punk.' you probably mean something loosely synonymous with 'thug.' When the people I know say 'punk' they're referring to someone they consider unable to take care of himself.

A semantic difference, nothing more.



posted on Mar, 21 2007 @ 10:13 AM
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Originally posted by HarlemHottie
I'm cautious. I don't see why that's such a problem.


I totally understand this. I'm cautious, too. I haven't always been the paragon of law-abidance that I am today.
FAR from it. And I have had less-than-pleasant dealings with the police. So, yeah, I'm cautious.

And like it or not, odds are, in America today, if you're black (or dark) there's more of a chance that you're going to get into trouble in an encounter with the police. If we don't face that reality, we're not going to get anywhere.

That doesn't mean that every black person is going to be abused by every cop. It doesn't mean every cop is a pig. It doesn't mean that every black person who has had an abusive encounter is innocent.

It just means that odds are, in America today, if you're black (or dark) there's more of a chance that you're going to get into trouble in an encounter with the police. It's just the odds.

Another point I want to make, although I'm hesitant (because I want everyone to like me)
... Some people seem to have the opinion that police, firefighter, military soldiers and other public servants are to be placed on a pedestal, simply for the act of joining such organizations and any negative talk about individuals in such organizations is seen as unacceptable.

I have NO PROBLEM with people feeling that way, but I don't share that opinion and not everyone shares that opinion and that doesn't mean we're communists or criminals or anti-American or some other pond scum.


Joining an organization does not make someone a hero. Heroic, honorable, respectable, honest behavior is what makes someone a hero. Not joining a group.

I appreciate anyone who is there for me when I'm in need, be it police, firefighter, soldiers or an indigent on the street. Anyone can be a hero. And I resist the idea that being a police officer automatically deserves respect, because in my book (it's around here somewhere) they don't.

[edit on 21-3-2007 by Benevolent Heretic]



posted on Mar, 21 2007 @ 10:21 AM
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Originally posted by HarlemHottie
No, they have more respect for me. They're not gonna rob me; we grew up together. The police, OTOH, have no such allegiance to me, or the people in my community.


I think this is a very important point. We hear a lot about the police coming in as heroes and doing what is best for the neighborhood. Very few, if any ofthese officers actually come from the neighborhood, and very rarely actually do waht's best for the neighborhood, and the people in it. The people rarely, if ever have a say in how their neighborhoods should be policed, and because of this you have cops running around with a superior attitude, and the feeling that they are, for whatever reason, better than those in the neighborhood. This is dangerous.




As far as I know, this is the first time I've said that. I was referring to the fact that, when you say 'punk.' you probably mean something loosely synonymous with 'thug.' When the people I know say 'punk' they're referring to someone they consider unable to take care of himself.


Also true,

If you went up to a gang member and called him a punk, you probably would get smackd up. Call them a thug and they wouldn't think twice about it.



posted on Mar, 22 2007 @ 12:06 AM
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Frankly I appreciate the cops in my town and the County Sheriff Dept is awesome. I've never had to wait more then 10 min in town (it was non-emergency) and 20 min in county. We tragically just lost a Deputy who was killed line of duty; the first one for our county. He was killed when his car was t-boned by a semi while he was responding to a 911 call. I had worked with him at the pen before he went to the Sheriff. He was an awesome man; we are richer for having known him and poorer for having lost him.

thanks Semper and to all cops



posted on Mar, 22 2007 @ 04:33 AM
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Originally posted by HarlemHottie

Originally posted by jsobecky
Furthermore, you are not sensitive to police being called pigs, even though they have come to your aid.

I'm just like, so what? There are so many other important things for them to worry about; I would think being called a 'pig' would be the least of their concerns.


It's not the cop's reaction that worries me. It's the attitude of supposedly educated adults who see nothing wrong with using such a disrespectful term.



It sounds like you have more respect for punks... than you do for police.


No, they have more respect for me. They're not gonna rob me; we grew up together. The police, OTOH, have no such allegiance to me, or the people in my community.

They respect you and would never rob you?



Originally posted by HarlemHottie
Actually, I was robbed by a gang-member once. I called the police, drove around to find her, and showed up whenever they needed my cooperation. The judge eventually called me into his chambers to ask what I thought should be done with them, the choices were jail and a farm. I figured that they would just get more entrenched into the gang culture if they went to jail, so I picked the farm. He told me I should go to law school.



posted on Mar, 22 2007 @ 04:44 AM
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Originally posted by Benevolent Heretic
Another point I want to make, although I'm hesitant (because I want everyone to like me)
... Some people seem to have the opinion that police, firefighter, military soldiers and other public servants are to be placed on a pedestal, simply for the act of joining such organizations and any negative talk about individuals in such organizations is seen as unacceptable.

I have NO PROBLEM with people feeling that way, but I don't share that opinion and not everyone shares that opinion and that doesn't mean we're communists or criminals or anti-American or some other pond scum.


Sadly, I have to agree with you here.

My generation was brought up to respect certain people because of their societal status. Mothers, for example, were respected because, well, they were our mothers. So were the elderly, because they were older and fragile. We would get up and give either of them our seat on the bus.

That's not the attitude in today's world.



posted on Mar, 22 2007 @ 10:58 AM
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Originally posted by jsobecky

My generation was brought up to respect certain people because of their societal status. Mothers, for example, were respected because, well, they were our mothers. So were the elderly, because they were older and fragile. We would get up and give either of them our seat on the bus.

That's not the attitude in today's world.


If we are to equate this line of thinking with police, and government office, then we could never hope to change things. We'd be stuck with the idea that they are where they are for a reason, and not question that reason, or motives. The elderly and mothers I can understand (to a point). Officers of the "law" is something different.



posted on Mar, 22 2007 @ 11:08 AM
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Originally posted by jsobecky
That's not the attitude in today's world.


And I don't think it should be the attitude in the world today. (And I notice you didn't say it should be.) Being a "mother" (getting pregnant and having a baby) doesn't take a whole lot of work on a woman's part. It doesn't inherently deserve respect.

When I was growing up, generally speaking, if a woman got pregnant, she took it seriously. It meant she'd have to make some compromises in her life and make changes and do what she needed to do for the sake of the child. It meant something to be a mother because by and large, women really tried to be good mothers.

That's not necessarily the case today. I'd still give my seat to a pregnant woman or an older person, but that's because of who I am, not because they automatically deserve respect.



posted on Mar, 22 2007 @ 08:09 PM
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Originally posted by semperfortis
I have no idea what an OLLLIE is, but I am glad you can do it and that you were not hurt....


Sorry, this is an ollie.


Originally posted by JamesMcMahn
What information did you give them? What was you description of the car? What was you description of the suspect?


Gave them them a full description of the car plus the first letter, and numeral of the license plate. Didn't get a good look at the driver though, it was weird. I looked right at him, and we made direct eye contact, but that's all I remember about his face.



posted on Mar, 22 2007 @ 09:27 PM
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Originally posted by jsobecky
My generation was brought up to respect certain people because of their societal status. Mothers, for example, were respected because, well, they were our mothers. So were the elderly, because they were older and fragile. We would get up and give either of them our seat on the bus.


And I still would give my seat on the bus to an elderly person. Problem is, I drive a car...

As much as I would show that physical aspect of respect, I would as much or more show them respect for their wisdom. And seek it. I always did when I was a kid and my great granddad was still alive.

If you can catch them at the right time in a talkative mood, and listen instead of yap, a great deal can be learned from the elderly. And I'm not claiming to have listened to all either. I'm just as guilty.

As to putting public servants on a pedestal, enforcement officers and military that continually put their lives on the line everyday ARE different from the rest. There is a certain urgency to their input; tomorrow they may not be here, times 10.

It takes a special kind of person to do that, and if anything they ought to be respected in a special way for willing to give up their lives to protect and serve.

If you want to call that putting them on a pedestal, be glad that you got to call it ANYTHING. The officer or soldier who lost his or her life yesterday serving YOU certainly cannot disagree with you now.

It's so easy just to go on about our lives and dismiss the death sacrifice enforcement people before us have made for us.

The decrepit veteran homeless are the epitome of US government and private hypocracy. If we can't impose upon the government to take care of them better, it really only leaves private interest as the other choice. The only pedestal they want to be put on is a warm bed.



posted on Mar, 22 2007 @ 11:07 PM
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Originally posted by TrueAmerican
As to putting public servants on a pedestal, enforcement officers and military that continually put their lives on the line everyday ARE different from the rest. There is a certain urgency to their input; tomorrow they may not be here, times 10.

It takes a special kind of person to do that, and if anything they ought to be respected in a special way for willing to give up their lives to protect and serve.

If you want to call that putting them on a pedestal, be glad that you got to call it ANYTHING. The officer or soldier who lost his or her life yesterday serving YOU certainly cannot disagree with you now.

It's so easy just to go on about our lives and dismiss the death sacrifice enforcement people before us have made for us.

The decrepit veteran homeless are the epitome of US government and private hypocracy. If we can't impose upon the government to take care of them better, it really only leaves private interest as the other choice. The only pedestal they want to be put on is a warm bed.

TA, that is so true.


You have voted TrueAmerican for the Way Above Top Secret award. You have used all of your votes for this month.



posted on Mar, 23 2007 @ 03:41 AM
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Originally posted by jsobecky
It's the attitude of supposedly educated adults who see nothing wrong with using such a disrespectful term.

I already said that I don't use it. What do you want from me?



They respect you and would never rob you?

I wasn't fully aware of my surroundings. I chalk that one up as my bad: wrong place, wrong time kind of situation. I was only 15.

Trust me, I'm all grown-up now.



posted on Mar, 23 2007 @ 04:33 AM
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Originally posted by HarlemHottie

Originally posted by jsobecky
It's the attitude of supposedly educated adults who see nothing wrong with using such a disrespectful term.

I already said that I don't use it. What do you want from me?

You don't use it, but you see nothing wrong with those that do use it. That's condoning it.




They respect you and would never rob you?


I wasn't fully aware of my surroundings. I chalk that one up as my bad: wrong place, wrong time kind of situation. I was only 15.

Trust me, I'm all grown-up now.

Good for you.



posted on Mar, 25 2007 @ 03:00 AM
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Originally posted by Rasobasi420
Also true,

If you went up to a gang member and called him a punk, you probably would get smackd up. Call them a thug and they wouldn't think twice about it.


Pffft. A thug is merely a punk with a gun. The only thing the gun does is make him feel like a man.



posted on Mar, 25 2007 @ 06:21 PM
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I just heard a little snippet on NPR from a cop who was talking about how 'nervous' they are to approach people. They never know if this is going to be the crazy guy that pulls a gun or a knife or what. Because that happens a lot. The cops feel that they have to be on guard and on the defensive because they don't know what they might be walking into.

Everytime they walk up to someone's car or knock on someone's door, they don't know how the person is going to react. If the person is guilty of something, there's a good chance they're going to try something.


This is just my opinion

But maybe if Police are so nervous to approach people then maybe they shouldnt bother people at all?

It's their job and if they feel like it's too dangerous they should be looking for a new line of work.

anybody who joins the Police should know this before even going to Police College so I dont know why theres the hig hoopla?



posted on Mar, 25 2007 @ 07:10 PM
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Good point Miishgoos

And I;d like to point out that the opposite can be true too. Maybe an otherwise law abiding individual who's used to bad experiences with police might run, or act nervous in when approached by someone who he knows has a gun, pepper spray, and (not or) a baton.



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