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Inmates Will Replace Migrants in Colorado Fields

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posted on Mar, 4 2007 @ 03:39 PM
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Inmates Will Replace Migrants in Colorado Fields


Source Link: www.nytimes.com

As migrant laborers flee Colorado because of tough new immigration restrictions, worried farmers are looking to prisoners to fill their places in the fields.

In a pilot program run by the state Corrections Department, supervised teams of low-risk inmates beginning this month will be available to harvest the swaths of sweet corn, peppers and melons that sweep the southeastern portion of the state.

Under the program, which has drawn criticism from groups concerned about immigrants’ rights and from others seeking changes in the criminal justice system, farmers will pay a fee to the state, and the inmates, who volunteer for the work, will be paid about 60 cents a day, corrections officials said.

(visit the link for the full news article)


[edit on 3/4/2007 by shots]




posted on Mar, 4 2007 @ 03:46 PM
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I think this is great news, and a direct result of Tom Tancredo's tireless work to stop illegal immigration.



posted on Mar, 4 2007 @ 03:48 PM
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Originally posted by jsobecky
I think this is great news, and a direct result of Tom Tancredo's tireless work to stop illegal immigration.


I also like the concept, but I do have a problem with paying them only 60 cents a day. Other then that I think it is a win win situation.



posted on Mar, 4 2007 @ 03:50 PM
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Excellent! As long as they're volunteers and low-risk, I see no problem with it. It gives them a chance to go out and do something rather than sit in a jail cell plus lessens the demand for illegal labor.



posted on Mar, 4 2007 @ 06:00 PM
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And people say manditory minimums for non violent drug offenses was a bad idea. Its going to help farmers hire at low wages to keep our food prices down. If this went to all industry we could compete in the global market, we just need more people in jail.



posted on Mar, 4 2007 @ 06:27 PM
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Originally posted by that1prsn If this went to all industry we could compete in the global market, we just need more people in jail.




I detect the sarcasm here. It's seditious comments like this that may have you picking peppers before you know it.



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 04:59 AM
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Originally posted by shots

Originally posted by jsobecky
I think this is great news, and a direct result of Tom Tancredo's tireless work to stop illegal immigration.


I also like the concept, but I do have a problem with paying them only 60 cents a day. Other then that I think it is a win win situation.

In this case, I would support paying them minimum wage for their work. You would get many volunteers, the fields would get planted/harvested, and you would see the illegals scrambling back home.



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 07:45 AM
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Inmate work crews are a great idea and they work well. Those in our state have done everything from landscaping to clean-up after natural disasters.

The biggest benefit derived from these crews has not been the actual outcome of the work, but the improvement in the attitudes and overall health of the inmates.

Bravo Colorado.



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 08:10 AM
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Originally posted by jsobecky

In this case, I would support paying them minimum wage for their work. You would get many volunteers, the fields would get planted/harvested, and you would see the illegals scrambling back home.


That is kind of what I was thinking. If they only offered them so little I doubt many would volunteer and I think that is the main issue here, they have to volunteer.



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 08:46 AM
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Originally posted by shots
That is kind of what I was thinking. If they only offered them so little I doubt many would volunteer and I think that is the main issue here, they have to volunteer.


You would think….but a friend’s brother was convicted of something ridiculously silly like 3 or maybe 4 DUI’s, once in state prison he was able to volunteer farm labor (Texas). In Texas you must volunteer…but apparently one must be “allowed” to volunteer first; based on a set of behavioral and conviction conditions, according to him.

I did ask why he did this volunteer work out of curiosity once (after his release). He claimed it was a faster path to parole because responsibility was given, the inmates were not the violent types (it was considered a privilege) and on the whole they are treated much better than inside the normal system….he also said it got him outdoors working with people which helped pass the time.

He became eligible for parole on a seven year sentence after serving half of his conviction period in prison. Which made me think, I would work for free (heck pay!) if I could buy 3 ½ years of my life back. What price can one put on that?


mg



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 10:07 AM
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Originally posted by missed_gear
In Texas you must volunteer…but apparently one must be “allowed” to volunteer first; based on a set of behavioral and conviction conditions, according to him.



Well I think that is very reasonable. It only stands to reason that they would want only low risk prisoners to volunteer simply because high risk would want to escape.



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 11:09 AM
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Maybe if the prison labor force runs thin, maybe you can rat out people for a bounty. After all it would be your civic duty. A whole new service industry could be created. What a wonderful way to extend capitalism!!



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 11:21 AM
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I don't think they'd have a problem "staffing" these farm work programs. Isn't the U.S. supposed to have one of the largest prison populations in the developed world? If more prisoners learned that honest work is the way out, maybe the numbers of prisoners would go down over time.

[edit on 3/5/2007 by centurion1211]



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 11:58 AM
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Originally posted by centurion1211
I don't think they'd have a problem "staffing" these farm work programs. Isn't the U.S. supposed to have one of the largest prison populations in the developed world? If more prisoners learned that honest work is the way out, maybe the numbers of prisners would go down over time.

That's exactly right, centurion1211.
This is one way to eliminate illegal immigration. These type of ideas are what is lacking in Washington. We have a large population of workers that could be used to their benefit and the benefit of the farmers.



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 12:20 PM
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Just ask Louisiana, Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama, and Texas.

The eventually stopped, started again, changed because of corruption.

Maybe some should play for the Colorado Buffalo's so they might win more than 1 or 2 games


[edit on 5-3-2007 by Royal76]



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 12:38 PM
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There is a reason inmates are not paid competitive wages. Unions have complained about the competition for contracts.



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 12:43 PM
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Originally posted by Creep Thumper
There is a reason inmates are not paid competitive wages. Unions have complained about the competition for contracts.


Which unions would those be? Also what do they consider a competitive wage?

[edit on 3/5/2007 by shots]



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 12:43 PM
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Well it's a natural decision for a debased society.

I mean as long as we have the largest prison population proportionally on the planet, mostly nonviolent drug offenders, we might as well use them as a source of slave labor, right?



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 01:04 PM
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Which unions would those be?


In our state, unions representing painters and construction workers have filed complaints. I believe I heard in the late 90's that there were also some landscaping trades involved, but I am not certain.


Also what do they consider a competitive wage?


A competitive wage, in this instance, is anything below what comparable professionals make. Even minimum wage for inmates has been challenged and defeated.

These people are criminals. They are well-provided for while they pay their debt to society. This is already a significant burden on the taxpayer. Keep in mind that, after organized programming and other needs are met, there isn't a great deal left in the budget for inmate pay. I can't think of a single taxpayer who would volunteer to pump more money into an already bloated area of the budget.



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 01:18 PM
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as previously mentioned, there is no reason to pay a competitive wage. the prisoners i have known would just about kill (pun intended) to be put on a work detail that gets them some fresh air and physical activity. i think it's an excellent idea, and i quite honestly dont give a damn about groups who push for the rights of people who are here illegally, and using my tax dollars for food and health benifits when american citizens are starving in the streets.

i mean really, they give them better benifits than most low-income american citizens....and they get it for breaking the law. so yeah, i'm all for something that underminds their position.




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