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Texas Family Experiences Missing Time

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posted on Mar, 4 2007 @ 10:42 AM
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Has anyone heard of this? What could have happend to them?

Texas Family Experiences Missing Time
"On February 4, 2007, the Coast Guard rescued a family, including a 11-year-old boy from Intracoastal Waterway near High Island, Texas. The family was disoriented and could not remember their names and weight. It was indeed a surprise when the Coast Guard responded by saying that they did not have any information about this incident..."

More here




posted on Mar, 4 2007 @ 05:28 PM
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This story sounds highly suspicious. First, I want the background information leading up to their rescue. Primarily, how did they contact the Coast Guard? If the family themselves contacted the CG by radio, then they would have to provide certain details as to their location, would they not? "SOS! Mayday! We're here in the Intracoastal Canal near High Island, and...umm...we can't remember our names, birthdays nor our respective body weights, and we need help!!"

See what I mean? There's something missing here, a disconnect between making a distress call (citing a specific location) and being so disoriented that you can't even remember your name or birthday.

The Intracoastal Canal is not an expansive body of water — as the name suggests, it's just a canal, a couple hundred yards wide at its widest, and maybe 20 or so feet deep — the Canal was designed to allow barge traffic to move up and down the coast in protected waters, without venturing into the rough waters of the Gulf of Mexico. I know this because I was born in Houston, and as a teenager I used to fish all up and down the Texas Gulf Coast, including at Bolivar Peninsula, Rollover Pass and High Island.

Yes, private citizens travel in the Canal all the time in small boats for fishing and crabbing and for the same reason the barges travel in there — to avoid the rough coastal waters offshore. The point is, it's a canal... You're not going to get lost in the Intracoastal Canal. You only have 2 directions, 2 options for travel... East or West. Either way, you're going to find civilization all around you, with boat ramps and docks and baithouses and people who are always prepared to help somebody in trouble.

So, you would have to be pretty far gone — for example, stoned out of your mind or suffering from heat exhaustion — in order to require emergency evacuation from the Canal. Again, if you're so oblivious that you need rescue, then how do you make a coherent call for the Coast Guard?

Well, the CG press release does not say who made the emergency radio call. It could have been a local sheriff's deputy or even another private citizen who made the call — and I would certainly think that other rescue options were considered before bringing in an HH-65C Dolphin helicopter, of all things, to airlift these people back to Houston. So, whatever was wrong with them, it was bad ass.

According to the CG press release, the family complained that "their bodies felt like they were slowing down"... Anybody out there ever had heat exhaustion? That's exactly what it feels like — just an overwhelming sinking feeling, like your strength is draining away, followed by such profound fatigue that you just want to lay down and pass out. It happens pretty quickly, too.

But... heat exhaustion in early February? I'm telling you, I'm from the Texas Gulf Coast, and I've never experienced heat exhaustion in early February. Early June, yes, mid-July, of course, and late August, damned straight... But not in early February.

What else could it be? No matter what time of year it is, hot or cold, people can get themselves into a hell of a predicament in the outdoors by failing to prepare for the effects of dehydration. Odd as it may sound, traveling by water for hours at a time dehydrates people faster than almost anything else — I suppose that's because your body is constantly, involuntarily trying to balance itself on the unsteady deck, so you're getting an invisible workout without even realizing it, and the wind is evaporating your perspiration as fast as you can pump it out.

So, a family of three gets out there on the Intracoastal Canal in early February, the temperature feels pretty cool, and they don't bring enough fluids to support themselves for several hours of travel. Next thing you know, dehydration sets in, with many of the same symptoms as heat exhaustion, including that sinking feeling, as if your body is slowing down.

To me that seems the most likely scenario — although, I've never heard of airlifting victims of dehydration some 80 miles to a hospital in the Texas Medical Center in Houston, especially since the hospitals in Galveston are prepared to deal with that sort of specific emergency on a moment's notice, and Galveston is only 40 miles from High Island.

—Doc Velocity

[edit on 3/4/2007 by Doc Velocity]



posted on Mar, 4 2007 @ 09:19 PM
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First of all, I'm so boring and "normal" that I wonder why I come to this site and read some of these threads. My best friend is more normal than I am, and is the manager of two major government facilities.

However, he told me in confidence one time that his parents were driving to their river camphouse one night. They were on the dirt road leading to it, remember seeing "something" in a field by the road, and the next instant were driving up in front of their cabin. The strange thing was when they saw "something" (neither remember what it was) they were a good 10 minutes away from the cabin, and when they seemed to instantly drive up in front of it, 45 minutes had passed.



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 01:35 AM
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Thanks for you reply. Yeah, a private citizen or someone else could have made the emergency radio call. But yes, sure the background is missing.

What I find strange is why were did CG ask their weight in the first place?
It's not an ordinary question in am emergence situation. And why did they suffer the loss of memory. Strange.



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 01:39 AM
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Well, I've never been airlifted out of an emergency situation, but I would think that the CG might ask that question before they loaded you into the lift basket, for obvious reasons, right? The helicopter pilot needs to know how much additional weight they're taking on. Makes sense to me.

Also, I didn't see anything in the CG press release about "missing time"... Where did that piece of information originate?

— Doc Velocity



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 01:58 AM
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What I find strange is why were did CG ask their weight in the first place?


Maybe the Coast Guard realized they weren't all there(state of mind) So they asked them a bunch of basic questions..Like how a referee might ask a boxer thats been knocked out..Just a thought..



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 03:39 PM
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Yes, this could be it. They saw they were disoriented and asked their weight and birthday simply to find out if they recalled anything.
They usually do so when people are in a strange frame of mind. This would at least explain one part of this story.



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 03:53 PM
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Well, part of me wants to think its an abduction...and the sane part of me thinks they got a hold of some mushrooms.....

Who knows? Any follow up to the story?



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 04:23 PM
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I am leaning towards mushrooms too - This story sounds too incredible, and with no information to back it up, I'm taking it with a keg of salt.

The slowing down thing, could be due to sleep depriviation. Loss of memory too.



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 04:23 PM
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Originally posted by Patrick_D
Has anyone heard of this? What could have happend to them?

Texas Family Experiences Missing Time
"On February 4, 2007, the Coast Guard rescued a family, including a 11-year-old boy from Intracoastal Waterway near High Island, Texas. The family was disoriented and could not remember their names and weight. It was indeed a surprise when the Coast Guard responded by saying that they did not have any information about this incident..."

More here


Sounds like hypothermia to me. Feelings of disorientation and stupor are quite common, and immediate medical attention (hence the medevac) is required.

It's not at all clear that this was a case of missing time.



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 04:25 PM
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I live in SE Texas and have not heard anything of the story until it was here. It came out a month after the fact. Cannot find anymore on the web.

It would seem it was nothing special to begin with but if it was the coverup is most likely already in place. I'll keep watching. By the way, Feb 4 was a pretty nice day weatherwise.



posted on Mar, 5 2007 @ 04:39 PM
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I emailed the website from the original post with a few questions about this story..If they reply I will be sure to fill you guys in..



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