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new thinnest material in the world

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posted on Mar, 3 2007 @ 05:21 AM
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the following is from timesonline.co.uk




"Scientists have created the thinnest material in the world and predict that it will revolutionise computing and medical research.

A layer of carbon has been manufactured in a film only one atom thick that defies the laws of physics. Placed in layers on top of each other it would take 200,000 membranes to reach high enough to match the thickness of a human hair.

The substance, graphene, was created two years ago but could be made only when stuck to another material. Researchers have now managed to manufacture it as a film suspended between the nanoscale bars of scaffolding made from gold.


thats right, thing of the supernano computers







[Mod Edit: Source link and formatting - Jak]


[edit on 4/3/07 by JAK]




posted on Mar, 3 2007 @ 05:32 AM
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A layer of carbon has been manufactured in a film only one atom thick that defies the laws of physics.


It does? Funny how my professors never mentioned that 'fact'. What laws do you think they break?

If you think that is cool, check this out...

en.wikipedia.org...

A Carbon Nanotube is merely a rolled up graphene sheet.

en.wikipedia.org...

Here is a buckyball article. Read up and enjoy. Buckytubes, Buckyballs and Graphene are the future.

[edit on 3-3-2007 by sardion2000]



posted on Mar, 3 2007 @ 05:34 AM
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I had trouble with the link provided but found it by searching at
www.timesonline.co.uk...

I found the article interesting that they stated this is a new technology and nanotechnology was not the right word to describe it. Much faster computers and faster transistors may result from this discovery. The material even stays together at room temperature. Good find.


[edit on 3-3-2007 by orionthehunter]



posted on Mar, 3 2007 @ 05:48 AM
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I just read this article in the american scientific about the m13 virus , a good virus with different sorts of protein wich can attach to practicly everything, they use this do build ion-batteries and so, the virus infect host bacteries to multiply, they can also attach to gold or nanotubes, whatever as buildingstones.. interesting all this nanotechnology[although this is more organic-nano tech]this is gonna be a revolution like fire was once to mankind..

m13



posted on Mar, 3 2007 @ 06:02 AM
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Actually Nanotubes, Graphene and Buckyballs are Organic Molecules. Perhaps by Organic you mean Biological. If that's the case then the term is Bionanotech. Quite an unwieldy term if you ask me, but It'll do.

Those m13 virus batteries sound interesting. I'll have to look them up when I'm on campus next.


this is gonna be a revolution like fire was once to mankind..


I agree, though please don't hype it up because we are still in the very early stages yet. All I expect in the next 5-10 years is better Electronic Paper, Smaller more powerful electronics/introduction of optronics and the start of the optronics vs. electronics vs. spintronics vs. rod logic format war
, faster internet, stronger/lighter materials, better solar panels, etc.

We're in the "improving existing products" stage in the game now. The truly radical stuff is still quite some ways off.

Regular old Biotech is looking more likely to have a resurgence in the near future what with the boom in Regenerative research that is currently going on atm.

news.bbc.co.uk...


But the discovery of a strain of mouse, the Murphy Roths Large (MRL), with remarkable regenerative capabilities has opened up the possibility that those properties could be transferred to other mammals.



Hole closure is seen in MRL mouse (right), but not in the control (left)

[edit on 3-3-2007 by sardion2000]



posted on Mar, 3 2007 @ 10:25 AM
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I think hydrogen takes the trophy when it comes to thinnest material.



posted on Mar, 3 2007 @ 11:07 PM
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Problem is, due to the structure of hydrogen, it would be nearly impossible to create a single atom thick mesh with it.

The reason being that Hydrogen can only make one bond. IE, you can have one hydrogen atom bonded with one hydrogen, or you can have hydrogen bonded to other atoms... but that one hydrogen atom can only bond with one other atom.

Carbon however bonds very well with itself, forming complex chains and meshes.

So you wouldnt be able to make a mesh out of hydrogen. So the fact that it's a very small atom makes little difference, it cannot form meshes to be compared to a carbon mesh.



posted on Mar, 4 2007 @ 08:58 AM
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Actually, I don't tink that's quite correct johnsky, I remember a while back some Chemists actually forced Hydrogen to form a Penta bond with 5 carbon atoms. I'm trying to find the article now, but am having no luck...



posted on Mar, 4 2007 @ 04:06 PM
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No, you misunderstood me, I don't exactly have a way with words.

That carbon bond involves a carbon atom, which is why you can bond it like that.

Here. I'll make a sorta diagram.

H-H

Hydrogen bonded with hydrogen... you cannot do this H-H-H

You can do this...
H-O-H
and
H-C-H (with more hydrogen atoms, I cant do 3d using text)
and many more bonds... however, you can only join that one Hydrogen atom to one other atom, it cant bond to 2 or more atoms at the same time.
H H H H H
H - C - C - C - C - C - H
H H H H H
This is very easy to do, as the carbons are the ones making multiple bonds... but the Hydrogen atoms only bond ONCE.

Thats what I was trying to get at... essentially.

What would be needed to make a mesh of hydrogen would be

H - H - H - H - H - H
H - H - H - H - H - H
H - H - H - H - H - H
H - H - H - H - H - H

Which cannot be done, hydrogen cant bond more than once, so using only hydrogen atoms you cant go beyond

H - H

Anyhow, If I'm still not making sense don't worry, I have a hard time explaining my thoughts exactly.



posted on Mar, 4 2007 @ 08:21 PM
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and many more bonds... however, you can only join that one Hydrogen atom to one other atom, it cant bond to 2 or more atoms at the same time.


This is incorrect, as of a few months ago. I was taught this in school as well and was rather shocked to discover that isn't necessarily the case all the time, I'll try to find the article. You could help out, it was posted on Physorg in January.


Anyhow, If I'm still not making sense don't worry, I have a hard time explaining my thoughts exactly.


No, you make complete sense. It's me who's floundering due to no article available. Sometimes I just hate google...

It's classified as a Superatom.

www.biophysica.com...

No mention of what I was talking about, but it still gives you an idea of what I talking about.

I'll continue looking.

[edit on 4-3-2007 by sardion2000]



posted on Mar, 6 2007 @ 12:15 AM
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Excellent... any addition to my knowlege of atomic physics is greatly appreciated.

I did a search and I wasn't able to find anything relating to a hydrogen based super-atom, but if someone's created an exception to the rule that would be quite impressive to read about.



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