It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Nutrients in Lunar soil?

page: 1
4

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 1 2007 @ 03:10 AM
link   
The first time man went to the moon, Apollo 11 in July 1969, they brang back about 22 kilograms of lunar rocks and soil.

I was just nosing through a NatGeo from December of that year (Pg. 791), and noticed an article about the tests they performed with the lunar material.
One of them involved fertilizing plants with the soil. As the article says, 'Growth was enhanced in some species, inhibited in others.' So the lunar soil can help?

I did a bit more research, and came across this:


ApolloExplorer.co.uk
The cabbage-like, darker circle of plants, about 3/8 inch tall at the highest point, is germinating in contact with the lunar material, but the lighter colored, blurred plant material surrounding the cabbage-like clump is not in contact with any of the lunar soil. Image.


I'm no green thumb - everything I plant seems to die pretty quick - so I was wondering if anyone else could tell me if it is expected that soil from the moon would help plants germinate?




posted on Mar, 3 2007 @ 11:40 AM
link   
Well, I believe that the moon was created when a large meteor hit the earth at some point, right?

And if so, its basic soil composition should be the same as the earth; ie. no extremely out of the ordinary appearences of some things.

But I expect it to have a bit higher concentration of some minerals, which could help plant growth, since meteors and the like that hits the moon, has high metal compositions, right? That would help some plants, and inhibit others. It also might affect any fungi that the plants need as symbiose partners, in a positive or negative way.

I hope I used the right words, not a native english speaker.. :/


apc

posted on Mar, 3 2007 @ 12:32 PM
link   

upload.wikimedia.org...

The magnesium, potassium, sodium, calcium, and iron are readily used by plants. Nitrogen and phosphate, which are very important, would have to be provided.

Nothing seems too special when compared to terran soil.

[edit on 3-3-2007 by apc]



posted on Mar, 3 2007 @ 12:57 PM
link   
The only thing markedly different(aside from the obvious pointed out by apc) is the amount of weathering earth soils have undergone. No atmosphere up there results in very jagged granules. This may damage roots and lungs if inhaled, gunpowder smell is what it's reported to emit when introduced to an atmosphere. It's also very clingy through some sort of static electric charge.



posted on Mar, 4 2007 @ 03:03 AM
link   
If the moon was created when a meteor hit the earth, as evidence lends itself to, then the chances that the microbes that started life on earth were in the dirt the eventually made the moon would be quite high, right?


apc

posted on Mar, 4 2007 @ 09:38 AM
link   
Lunar rock is dated to about 4.4-4.5 billion years if I remember right. So the formation was very soon after Earth took shape. Doubtful any organic material had gotten established yet. I'd wager if there are any organic compounds on the Moon, they didn't come from Earth. With the exception of a few bugs off Neil's boot or possibly some ejecta from another impact.




top topics
 
4

log in

join