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"Shock and Awe" first thought of by terrorist.

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posted on Feb, 27 2007 @ 08:01 AM
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Before the american "shock and awe" operation, the terrorist "shock and awed" the americans with their 9/11 attack. When Bush heard of the attack he was so "shock and awed" by the news that he appeared stunned and did nothing for some time while still attending a childrens reading session.

The pentigan building in the captial of the United States which has the highest sercurity in the country was attacked with a no fly zone in that area. The Security there was too "shocked and awed" by the twin tower attack that they fail to do their duty and intercept plane in the no fly zone.

The american air force which before 9/11 normally intercepted most cilvilan air craft within minutes when informed that there was aterrorist take over, fail to intercept most of the air craft that were being taken hostage in 9/11 as they were slow to react, as they were to shocked and awed by the attacks.

The Credit of Shock and Awe should go to the terrorist.

America has normally always been fast to react to natural dieasters, has hurricane "Katerina" shocked and awed them and slowed rescue operations by up to 3 days. Is it just my imagination or are the americans so unprepared for these situations during Bush's regime.

Is the comander-in-chief incompetent or was it all planned? Maybe Bush isn't so dumb after all.




posted on Feb, 27 2007 @ 08:18 AM
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Maybe it was an inside job. But bush is only a pawn and had no prior knowledge. Dick on the other hand is shady looking.



posted on Feb, 27 2007 @ 03:06 PM
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Originally posted by ixiy

The american air force which before 9/11 normally intercepted most cilvilan air craft within minutes when informed that there was aterrorist take over, fail to intercept most of the air craft that were being taken hostage in 9/11 as they were slow to react, as they were to shocked and awed by the attacks.



Actually that's not accurate with regards to the intercept times-

First of all, with the exception of Payne Stewart's plane's interception, there are rarely if any intercepts over the CONUS.
www.popularmechanics.com...

Intercepts Not Routine
CLAIM: "It has been standard operating procedures for decades to immediately intercept off-course planes that do not respond to communications from air traffic controllers," says the Web site oilempire.us. "When the Air Force 'scrambles' a fighter plane to intercept, they usually reach the plane in question in minutes."

FACT: In the decade before 9/11, NORAD intercepted only one civilian plane over North America: golfer Payne Stewart's Learjet, in October 1999. With passengers and crew unconscious from cabin decompression, the plane lost radio contact but remained in transponder contact until it crashed. Even so, it took an F-16 1 hour and 22 minutes to reach the stricken jet. Rules in effect back then, and on 9/11, prohibited supersonic flight on intercepts. Prior to 9/11, all other NORAD interceptions were limited to offshore Air Defense Identification Zones (ADIZ).


No Stand-Down Order
CLAIM: No fighter jets were scrambled from any of the 28 Air Force bases within close range of the four hijacked flights. "On 11 September Andrews had two squadrons of fighter jets with the job of protecting the skies over Washington D.C.," says the Web site emperors-clothes.com. "They failed to do their job." "There is only one explanation for this," writes Mark R. Elsis of StandDown.net. "Our Air Force was ordered to Stand Down on 9/11."

FACT: On 9/11 there were only 14 fighter jets on alert in the contiguous 48 states. No computer network or alarm automatically alerted the North American Air Defense Command (NORAD) of missing planes. "They [civilian Air Traffic Control, or ATC] had to pick up the phone and literally dial us," says Maj. Douglas Martin, public affairs officer for NORAD. Boston Center, one of 22 Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regional ATC facilities, called NORAD's Northeast Air Defense Sector (NEADS) three times: at 8:37 am EST to inform NEADS that Flight 11 was hijacked; at 9:21 am to inform the agency, mistakenly, that Flight 11 was headed for Washington (the plane had hit the North Tower 35 minutes earlier); and at 9:41 am to (erroneously) identify Delta Air Lines Flight 1989 from Boston as a possible hijacking. The New York ATC called NEADS at 9:03 am to report that United Flight 175 had been hijacked--the same time the plane slammed into the South Tower. Within minutes of that first call from Boston Center, NEADS scrambled two F-15s from Otis Air Force Base in Falmouth, Mass., and three F-16s from Langley Air National Guard Base in Hampton, Va. None of the fighters got anywhere near the pirated planes.

Why couldn't ATC find the hijacked flights? When the hijackers turned off the planes' transponders, which broadcast identifying signals, ATC had to search 4500 identical radar blips crisscrossing some of the country's busiest air corridors. And NORAD's sophisticated radar? It ringed the continent, looking outward for threats, not inward. "It was like a doughnut," Martin says. "There was no coverage in the middle." Pre-9/11, flights originating in the States were not seen as threats and NORAD wasn't prepared to track them.



abclocal.go.com...

www.globalsecurity.org...

The size and composition of 1st Air Force's flying unit force structure continued to be a major issue during the transition. Over recent decades, the air defense interceptor force defending North America had been dramatically reduced from a high of 2,600 dedicated aircraft (including the Royal Canadian Air Force) in 1958. It had shrunk to 20 ANG fighters at 10 alert locations for CONAR by February 1996. However, 1st Air Force continued to face strong budgetary pressures to either eliminate or dramatically reduce dedicated ANG fighter interceptor units for the air defense and air sovereignty.



posted on Feb, 28 2007 @ 03:01 AM
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Thats for the update BlueRaja, I'm really surprized to find that America Air space was so vunerable before and during 9/11.

I always thought that the American Airspace was fully covered with all the radars around, civilian airports, military base, radar planes, etc. etc.

So when the hijacked planes turned of the transponders, it would be an easy matter to track them, find the blimps with no transponer signals.

But since the radar coverage of the American Airspace was so limited, I guess it would be hard. Did they also forget that they had saterlight tracking or was that aimed outwards as well?

Why didn't they get more information on the location and rough direction of the hijacked planes from the civilian sources before planes transponders were turned off?

I wonder if the intercept fighters would go on supersonic flight to catch Air Force One if it was in trouble, I guess hijacked civilian planes are low on their priority......
. Where are they gonna go?....
and I thought the Military and National Security had the brightest people. Better not let Isreal hear this one.

I wonder if the terrorists were well informed, or that they were really lucky. If the CIA was really forewarn, one would think that they would at least look into this lapses unless for some reason they did not calculate the terrorist chances of success or let it happen.

Anyway its good to know all this, thanks for the information.

[edit on 28-2-2007 by ixiy]



posted on Feb, 28 2007 @ 02:46 PM
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Originally posted by ixiy

So when the hijacked planes turned of the transponders, it would be an easy matter to track them, find the blimps with no transponer signals.


Why didn't they get more information on the location and rough direction of the hijacked planes from the civilian sources before planes transponders were turned off?


[edit on 28-2-2007 by ixiy]


The problem with the first question is that the ATC displays, don't show the raw radar data, so with the transponders off, they had to go to another display with the radar data. Of course this display didn't show transponder data, which is where the confusion set in. They had a bunch of blips, and they had to go on the last known direction and location, and/or filed flight plan.

The answer to the second question is that they didn't know the planes were hijacked in time before the transponders were turned off, to try to alert the Air National Guard, nor did they know the intent of the hijackers before they started crashing planes.




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