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How Long Will Canned Foods Last?

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posted on Apr, 29 2007 @ 11:18 PM
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Originally posted by tokenblonde
I too have concerns regarding fresh water sources. Would a swimming pool water be suitable for drinking. chlorine is added, with a few others. Any thoughts?

If you have access to a lot of water (aka: river, lake, ocean or pool) the best thing for you is a Reverse Osmosis filtering system. It can work on gravity alone but if you pour let's say 5 gallons of water in it, it will create maybe 6-7 gallons of waste water and 3-4 gallons of clear water.

But rest assured, aside from nuclear contamination, an RO filter will clean out almost every possible impurity. I would have no problems drinking some's piss if it had gone into an RO filter first.

[edit on 29-4-2007 by PepeLapew]




posted on Jul, 7 2008 @ 04:36 PM
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I suggest you contact an expert in this field. There is a lot of information on the net. The Mayo Clinic website says canned goods are good for 2 to 5 years after the date. The food is not expired after that date. Sellers can legally sell canned goods after the date on the can.
JJ



posted on Jul, 7 2008 @ 05:46 PM
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This thread reminds me of this story from a couple of years ago:

Husband eats 50 year old chicken



posted on Jul, 7 2008 @ 05:58 PM
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I have a buddy in Florida that dunks his stored canned goods in wax. yah. He's serious, and so is his family, and if I lived in Florida, I might do the same.

Here's a tip for you folks like me that live in warm climates. You know how flour wevils "get" in flour and pasta and sometimes rice after being stored a while? Well, I did an experiment a couple of years ago. I transferred wheat flour to three glass containers that had a rubber grommet on the top and those crimp-down sealers? Well, yep, you guessed it. They still "got" flour wevils. I concluded from that that the eggs of the wevils occur naturally with the wheat and other products, and we normally consume them without knowing. yah. Pure protein, no worries.

So I started freezing these products first, thinking that the expansion of the fluids inside the eggs would kill them. Well, it works. I have over two years of wheat, pasta, beans, rice products, and we rotate our stocks. Since I've started freezing them first, not a SINGLE ONE has exibited the signs of food-infesting insects, and our mean temperature here rarely gets below 60 degrees.

Many canned goods are made of aluminum lately. Not only was the seamed tin cans a problem in the past as a previous poster noted, but dents sometimes produced breaks in the interior which caused rusting, which lead to the integrity of them being compromised. Nowadays, I am wary of bulged cans, as that's indicative of swelling caused by gasses.... and a possibility of botulism.

I spray stored canned goods with that squirt-on cooking oil. We have canned goods well over two years old, and they look right as rain. I tend towards sprayed olive oil, as I believe it is less likely to turn rancid.

Also, regarding storing oils...... Beware of storing in plastic. I personally don't trust much beyond olive oil, and I've acquired quite a bit of it in the steel tins.



posted on Jul, 7 2008 @ 06:00 PM
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Think about canning, or, actually more properly said bottling your own goods. It's not difficult, and you can safely can meats, butter, cheese, as well as most all fruits and vegetables.

Also, many things are appropriate for dehydration, and lots of stuff reconstitutes fairly well.

Canning resources: www.canningusa.com...

[edit on 7-7-2008 by argentus]



posted on Jul, 7 2008 @ 09:22 PM
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What are you storing water for? Is the apocalypse that close?



posted on Jul, 8 2008 @ 04:36 AM
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I beleive canned goods if stored and checked properly have an almost indefinate shelf life. There have been accounts of 70+ year old cans being opened and the food still being edible.

For water that is 'outside' in streams, etc boiling is essential if not crucial before drinking, even though you may have a filter system. Boiling will kill everything.

Ah flour weevils, yes i remember many years ago when i was still a bit green around the gills finding my kitchen cupboard 'infested' with them. I told my next door neighbour about this. She happened to be a 'Domestic Science Teacher'. She came and looked and said that it is virtually impossible in this day and age to NOT have them. They are perfectly safe to 'consume' she said. I dont know whether filtering them out first before storing would 'cure' the problem.



posted on Jul, 9 2008 @ 01:16 AM
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[bottled water in glass instead of plastic



posted on Jul, 11 2008 @ 10:06 PM
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reply to post by Wotan
 


Since the eggs of the wevils (shipped with the goods) are nearly as small as say, flour grains, I'd guess it'd be difficult to sift them out, but the freezing really works. Works with pasta, rice, beans, flour, corn products, etc. Of course, after the freezing, they need to be in a sealed, airtight container, and tossing in a couple of those little dessicant bags seems to help too.

Saw you on another survival thread. I think you have a good handle on things, and I like your style of dealing with folks who attempt to bait you. cheers



posted on Jul, 12 2008 @ 09:55 AM
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reply to post by argentus
 


Hahaha, thanks - I am a bit out of practice but starting to get back into the swing of things again - Methods and thinking has changed somewhat since the 80's.

Well US ISLANDERS have to stick together



posted on Jul, 12 2008 @ 10:31 AM
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Originally posted by Garaman Rex
Dents in cans aren't as big a worry now as in the past. Old cans were made with seams that, if dented, could compromise the integrity of the can. Now most canned goods come in cans that are made from a single piece of metal with the only seam being where the top is join to the can.


To my understand, dents are still an issue. Most cans are coated inside with some sort of plastic inner lining. Dent's could break the seal of this ,iner internally and cause it to leech into the contents.



posted on Jul, 12 2008 @ 10:35 AM
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I don't know about commerically canned products but I personally can a lot and all my books recommend keeping home canned products no more than a year.

Of course unless you're pickling or salting you don't use preservetives at home like they do commerically... though I have been known to add saltpeter to homemade smoked sausages.



posted on Nov, 28 2008 @ 12:57 AM
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I've noticed with some canned foods, like soup or beans as examples, that some of the older cans seem to have lost moisture. The contents appear to be drier than a "fresher" can. These are big name brands, too.



posted on Jan, 29 2009 @ 11:54 AM
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reply to post by 12m8keall2c
 


Hello, the link you offered is no longer valid. Do you have an updated link to use? I can't seem to find the info that once was there.

Thanks much



posted on Jan, 29 2009 @ 12:13 PM
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I buy rice, flour and dry beans, etc. and I then use my Food saver vacuum sealer. I put them in about 8x10 bags, date them and put them up. I use the oldest ones, and keep adding new. This works well because if I kept them in 50lb sacks, and opened one to use, they would go stale before I got to the end of them. Also with flour, you don't have to worry about flour bugs, which they can get if stored in the original paper packaging.

On a side note, a few years ago, my 93 yr old grandfather was trying to give me some food from his freezer. He always liked to give me a little something when I was ready to leave, whether it be food, knicknack, etc. He pulled out a large plastic container, opened it up and handed me a pecan to taste. As I'm crunching on it, he says, " I got these here pecans in 19 and 70 ,down south." They'd been in his freezer the whole time, but they tasted fresh as can be. I was surprised!

PS. I've been recently very interested in collecting old cookbooks/general information books from the 1800's. There are a lot of good recipes in these books from everything from medical/herbal concoctions to smoking/drying/salting meat, etc. It's very informative and those recipes could be used in a survival situation.

[edit on 29-1-2009 by virraszto]



posted on Jan, 29 2009 @ 12:41 PM
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I bought some canned salmon the other day...
Expiration date was 2014. That's the longest expiration date I've seen on some canned foods at your regular grocery store.

Tuna is 2012

Canned vegetables are generally 2010



posted on Feb, 27 2009 @ 07:04 PM
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Canned foods are good for at least 2 years. it depends on how much acid is in the food. if there is less acid then it would last longer then canned food with high amounts of acid. and thats all i noooo!!!!



posted on Feb, 27 2009 @ 07:17 PM
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reply to post by mantic
 


no i disagree with you on this topic. i dont think dents matter because first there is no inner layer second dents are sometimes in fruits and we still eat them and thirdly they just dont matter. so if you drop a canned food on the floor that you just got from the store and you then find a dent, would you throw it out??? i dont think soooo!!!!



posted on Feb, 27 2009 @ 07:17 PM
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reply to post by mantic
 


no i disagree with you on this topic. i dont think dents matter because first there is no inner layer second dents are sometimes in fruits and we still eat them and thirdly they just dont matter. so if you drop a canned food on the floor that you just got from the store and you then find a dent, would you throw it out??? i dont think soooo!!!!



posted on Feb, 27 2009 @ 09:00 PM
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Storage of emergency drinking water:
If you have a beer drinker in the household, you are good to go.
Save those glass bottles, a trip to the home brew supplies , and buy some bottle caps, metabisulphate and a bottle capper.
Rinse with metabisuphate as per instuctions, add boiled /cooled water, cap, and store in a dark, cool place.



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