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Memo: Stop teaching evolution

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posted on Feb, 18 2007 @ 11:36 AM
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This just in:


AUSTIN – The second most powerful member of the Texas House has circulated a Georgia lawmaker's call for a broad assault on teaching of evolution.



Mr. Bridges also supplies a link to a document that describes scientists Carl Sagan and Albert Einstein as "Kabbalists" and laments "Hollywood's unrelenting role in flooding the movie theaters with explicit or implicit endorsement of evolutionism."


Full story here: www.dallasnews.com...

Who ever voted for this guy... enjoy his stupidity and ignorance.




posted on Feb, 18 2007 @ 11:51 AM
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-hurl-



GROSS.

I'm so sick of this creationist religious crap.

evolution has scientifically evaluated evidence to back it up, creationism does not. While faith is somewhat involved in the belief of evolution, faith is all that is involved in creationism. Teach creationism in an elective theology course, not flippen science. I wouldn't want to be taught that.


The article smells a little antisemitic as well. Go figure.


Dern libral jews in hollywood teachin' our kids wut we dont believes in!



posted on Feb, 18 2007 @ 12:15 PM
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Imagine that eh, legislating ignorance!
Ignore the facts, ignore the truth, ignore anything that may disrupt their fairy tale beliefs.
Faith is a fragile thing, and they cling to it like a sock on a sweater from the dryer, they fear the static guard of truth.

So they ban static guard!

If science proves god is not real, so be it, if science shows the possibility of god, so be it. I'd rather know the truth than live in a state of ignorance, AKA faith.

I have a million bux in my pocket, it is all yours if you believe that I have it, have faith that I do.
Do you have faith in that?

Anyway, when they use laws to protect a belief system from scrutiny, all they have done is to ban seeking of truth and legislating ignorant bliss.
What a wonderful world!



posted on Feb, 18 2007 @ 04:04 PM
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one of the sources cited in the material being circulated in this story is actually a geocentrist group as well as a creationist group...

yes, geocentrists still exist



posted on Feb, 18 2007 @ 04:23 PM
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Religion has always felt threatened by knowledge. If they fought for centuries against the idea that the Earth is round then they will fight evolution even longer.

What I find odd about it is the more I learn the more I come to believe in God.



posted on Feb, 18 2007 @ 04:36 PM
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Fascinating that he links it to Kabbala.

Its not surprising that Kabbala gives some fundies the heebbie jeebies, its jewish, and its 'occultic'. Hilarious that he'd say that it gave us evolutionary theory. Wonder what else he thinks the 'joooos' are up to. NOtice the hollywood criticism there too.

Check out the actual memo too, he's really hitting up the 'joos' angle.

religiousfreaks.com...

He cites three webpages in that letter, here they are:

www.fixedearth.com...

www.fixedearth.com...

www.fixedearth.com...

He also provides a contact email:

fefinc@hemc.net

"FINK" eh?

[edit on 18-2-2007 by Nygdan]

Interesting that he notes that "Creation Science", which he puts in quotes, can't legally be taught in schools.

[edit on 18-2-2007 by Nygdan]

[edit on 18-2-2007 by Nygdan]



posted on Feb, 18 2007 @ 04:45 PM
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Wow, this particular bill has been going on since 2005!

groups.google.com...#



posted on Feb, 19 2007 @ 11:20 AM
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This is sh**.

And one of the reasons why i dont believe in democracy (Well i do like democracy, im a socialist, but not this kind of superficial democry that most democratic countrys are running. ITS NOT DEMOCRACY).

You cant vote on what to teach...



posted on Feb, 19 2007 @ 11:35 AM
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This is just another example of how knowledge and religion are often diametrically opposite of each other with the religious prefering ignorance over education just because it conflicts with their faith



posted on Feb, 19 2007 @ 11:38 AM
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Originally posted by Jugg
This is sh**.

And one of the reasons why i dont believe in democracy ... You cant vote on what to teach...


Given that approximately 85% of Americans are religious; and most of them Christian, you should be grateful that there is no direct vote on what to teach. I use the word "direct" because the moron whose giving this piece legs was likely voted into office by a religious majority.



posted on Feb, 19 2007 @ 11:41 AM
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Why don't schools teach our children both


Of course the science of our history and evolution should be taught to students, but why not include classes that have the Bible, Koran, Torah, etc... as text books ?

If every student had a basic understanding of religion and science they would be able to draw their own conclusions as to what is faith and what is truth.
They would be able to think for themselves as they view the world around them and not be indoctrinated into blindly following one idea.

Or is that just too frightening for some people ???



posted on Feb, 19 2007 @ 11:57 AM
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Originally posted by anxietydisorder
Why don't schools teach our children both


Of course the science of our history and evolution should be taught to students, but why not include classes that have the Bible, Koran, Torah, etc... as text books ?

If every student had a basic understanding of religion and science they would be able to draw their own conclusions as to what is faith and what is truth.
They would be able to think for themselves as they view the world around them and not be indoctrinated into blindly following one idea.

Or is that just too frightening for some people ???


I had an "Intro to Religions" class a few years ago at another college. about 80-85% of the class started as christians, only about 25-30% came out full christians, the rest of that 80-85% came out either atheist, agnostic, or took to a different religion. So I'd imagine it's a fear thing for fundie parents. They'd would want ONLY their bible being taught, no one else's.

For the record, I was already atheist, but it helped me understand how/why other cultures (past/present) think and act the way they do. I believe that class should be taught in high-school, as it would help stop a lot of ignorance and prejudice that goes on, and also free-up a lot of misconceptions that different people of different faiths have. And it was kind of like a anthropology class too. Fun!


But, it'll never happen. Schools are so underfunded, that art and music are being cancelled. The fundies will never allow classes that shed good light on 'opposing' faiths enter the classroom, especially if the other electives are being cut (unless it was bible study class
)

Oh well..Nice thought though.

[edit on 2/19/2007 by Arcane Demesne]



posted on Feb, 19 2007 @ 12:55 PM
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Originally posted by Arcane Demesne
I believe that class should be taught in high-school, as it would help stop a lot of ignorance and prejudice that goes on, and also free-up a lot of misconceptions that different people of different faiths have. And it was kind of like a anthropology class too. Fun!


I think that largely depends on the person teaching the class; don't you? A teacher/professor who has serious biases for/against religion could easily steer students in whatever whatever direction he desires. I'm curious: Do you know your teacher's religious backgound?

Evolution has a lot of science in support if its position whereas the existence of God has none. I believe that there already exists several venues for religious education: Church/Mosques/Mass/Synagouge/Sunday School/etc. Why impose religion in a tax-payer funded forum (Public schools)? I prefer my children not be exposed until they're much older and able to logically decide for themselves what they want to believe.



posted on Feb, 19 2007 @ 01:05 PM
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How do you teach mythology as fact?

You call it faith.
You cannot teach students biblical mythology as fact, you can analyze it, study it and draw conclusions, but they can't teach it as fact.

What's ironic is that a close study of the bible has created more agnostics and atheists than any other way IMO.



posted on Feb, 19 2007 @ 01:15 PM
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Originally posted by Freedom_for_sum

I think that largely depends on the person teaching the class; don't you?


I know it's impossible, but I would hope such a class could be taught without the bias and personal opinions of the educator entering into the lesson.


I prefer my children not be exposed until they're much older and able to logically decide for themselves what they want to believe.


And here we have the problem.
Parents only want their children exposed to their own religion and beliefs while they are young so they don't question those ideas when they start thinking for themselves.

Let's make sure we blind them while they're young so they never see the truth. :shk:



posted on Feb, 19 2007 @ 02:46 PM
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Warren Chisum, who forwarded this memo to the Texas house, is quoted here saying: "I had no intention to offend anyone" and says he received the memo from Georgia legislator Ben Bridges and "I never took it very seriously." He apologizes (according to link) and admits to not "carefully" reviewing the memo prior to sending it out.


Rep. Ben Bridges is quoted www.ajc.com..." target="_blank" class="postlink" rel="nofollow">here as saying: "I did not put it out nor did I know it was going out,” Bridges said. “I’m not defending it or taking up for it."


Bridges has a bill, reported here in'05, that was probably the reason he received this 'memo'. Georgia General Assembley House Bill 179

The bill looks to be dead for a couple years (atleast I can find nothing recent on this until the memo in question)


My theory: Someone (the writer[s] of the memo) was having some fun with Bridges, because of his bill.


Here's a copy of the memo and its 'supporting' links.


Some whacked-out and paranoid conspriracy 'theory' where the Jews are using evolution to further their nefarious plans. It's a joke... sorta like that paranoid, and just as whacked-out, 'theory' on "ID creationists" and the coming theocracy.

*swoon* I've got the vapors... ohhh lawdie... the vapors *swoon*


What's ironic is that a close study of the bible has created more agnostics and atheists than any other way IMO.


Nothing like hypothetical statistical arguments to make your point. C'mon guys fess up... one of you wrote this memo didn't ya?

Did ya'll see the 'petition against religous upbringing' that some atheists are pushing? Dawkins signed it but later retracted his name. Read more here (has link to petition.) You guys are against that kind of ignorant bigotry also, yes?

I'm sure you were writing that thread up next, right?

The coming Atheocracy ... oh lawdie not agian
*swoon* I've got the vapors... Lawdielawd, the vapors. *swoon*



posted on Feb, 19 2007 @ 03:35 PM
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Originally posted by anxietydisorder
Let's make sure we blind them while they're young so they never see the truth. :shk:


I think it's more like "Let's make sure we brainwash them when they're young so they're never compelled to seek the truth.

Personal Experience: I went to church occasionally (wasn't forced or compelled) as a child and again when I became a teen. I decided for myself as an adult that religion wasn't for me. But there are examples all over where parents force their kids to learn and practice whatever their family religion is and the children only learn what they are forced to learn and to not question it. Basic brainwashing.



posted on Feb, 19 2007 @ 06:56 PM
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Originally posted by Freedom_for_sum
I think that largely depends on the person teaching the class; don't you? A teacher/professor who has serious biases for/against religion could easily steer students in whatever whatever direction he desires. I'm curious: Do you know your teacher's religious backgound?


She was an ex-christian. But agnostic, not atheist. She still believed in a 'supreme' being.



Evolution has a lot of science in support if its position whereas the existence of God has none. I believe that there already exists several venues for religious education: Church/Mosques/Mass/Synagouge/Sunday School/etc. Why impose religion in a tax-payer funded forum (Public schools)? I prefer my children not be exposed until they're much older and able to logically decide for themselves what they want to believe.


Church is fine for dogma and theology, but religion can also be used to study history of culture and art as well. People should learn religion as culture (not as theology) in public schools, either as a social studies, or a history. I know some school dabble very lightly, but generally paint an odd picture on certain religions (cultures). That's what I meant. Sorry for the confusion.

edit: man I suck at quoting, ha




[edit on 2/19/2007 by Arcane Demesne]



posted on Feb, 19 2007 @ 07:06 PM
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Originally posted by Freedom_for_sum

But there are examples all over where parents force their kids to learn and practice whatever their family religion is and the children only learn what they are forced to learn and to not question it. Basic brainwashing.


::raises hand::

Yeah. My parents are still at it. They won't accept the fact that there is such a thing as Atheism. They think everyone needs to believe in a creator. I'm just glad I got out of it early [and logically. Irrational atheism [disbelief for spite) is no better than theology in my opinion].

And to clear my last post again. I didn't mean to teach kids dogma in schools, just tell them what different cultures believed, and where those beliefs came from. No push either way, it should have to do with social studies and history, not religion it self.



posted on Feb, 20 2007 @ 01:44 PM
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Originally posted by Arcane Demesne
And to clear my last post again. I didn't mean to teach kids dogma in schools, just tell them what different cultures believed, and where those beliefs came from. No push either way, it should have to do with social studies and history, not religion it self.


I understand what you meant. The problem is that I have very little faith (pun intended) in an educator's ability to not intruduce his/her own biases during the process thereby risking violating separation of church and state.

Not to hijack the thread: Since there is no empirical scientific proof or evidence that God exists; people's believe in God is strictly based on faith. Likewise; since there is no empirical scientific proof or eveidence that there is no God; isn't Atheism also based on Faith? I think Atheism is no more reasoned or logical than the belief that God exists.



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