It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Settlement Eliminates Race in Journalism Programs

page: 1
7

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 14 2007 @ 07:55 PM
link   
According to the following report, a court settlement now effectively bars race in journalism programs. A program which accepted a white high school student, but was later rejected because of race, led to court and ultimately the settlement. The program was intended for minorities only, and now because of the settlement, if the program is to continue they must use "race-neutral criteria".
 



www.msnbc.msn.com
RICHMOND, Va. - Race will not be used as a criterion for enrollment in more than two dozen urban journalism programs nationwide under settlement of a lawsuit filed for a white high school student who was rejected.

Dow Jones Newspaper Fund, which sponsors the programs, and other principals agreed to the settlement in return for the legal challenge’s being withdrawn by the Center for Individual Rights, both parties said Wednesday.

The center filed the class-action lawsuit in September on behalf of Emily Smith, 16. She said she was accepted last spring to the Urban Journalism Workshop at Virginia Commonwealth University but one week later was rejected after program sponsors learned she was white.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


While an inflammatory topic, the above report highlights what many are frustrated over. Programs which favor a race, because they intend to target minorities, while excluding any qualified applicant because of race alone. This is called by many "reverse discrimination".

Why would a white person apply for a program that was obviously intended for blacks and/or "minorities"?

I can understand why the program was made, and perhaps when it was set up, it was intended to bring more black students into Journalism. Personally I applaud that effort, and can only hope they can find a way to continue. But while on the surface these programs seem well intended, they could ultimately create the perception of "reverse discrimination".

I think as a nation, and society, if we ALL wish to escape the stigma of racism in all forms, then any and all "programs" should never exclude anyone for any other reason than qualifications, or lack there of.

[edit on 14-2-2007 by UM_Gazz]




posted on Feb, 14 2007 @ 10:37 PM
link   

Why would a white person apply for a program that was obviously intended for blacks and/or "minorities"?

Why would they? The question is, why wouldn't they? There is no rational reason to have such a program.



I can understand why the program was made, and perhaps when it was set up, it was intended to bring more black students into Journalism. Personally I applaud that effort, and can only hope they can find a way to continue.

I cannot understand why such a program would ever be considered. There are no roadblocks to blacks in journalism. Why create an artificial situation? It is racist at it's core.



posted on Feb, 15 2007 @ 12:19 AM
link   

Originally posted by jsobecky
There are no roadblocks to blacks in journalism.

Really?



The industry is falling further behind benchmark targets set by ASNE six years ago to chart performance toward a goal of newsroom parity with the U.S. minority population by 2025. Every three years, the editors report the progress toward achieving this goal.

This year’s report card shows that newsrooms have failed to meet the five benchmark categories:

* The benchmark for percentage of minorities working in newsrooms by this year is 18.55. The actual percentage: 13.87.
* The goal for minority interns is 36.35 percent of the total pool. The actual number: 30.8 percent.
* The goal for minority supervisors is 16 percent. The actual number: 11.2 percent
* The target for the number of newspapers with no minority staffers was to reduce them to 275. The actual number: 377.
* The benchmark for the number of newspapers that have reached parity with their community is 348. The actual number: 145.
ASNE census shows newsroom diversity grows slightly


Don't let the title fool you. In the body of the article, in case you don't read it, they add,



“While it’s encouraging that the number of minority staffers in American newsrooms is up, the increase — .45 percent — is almost imperceptible,” said ASNE Diversity Chair Sharon Rosenhause, managing editor of the South Florida Sun-Sentinel, Fort Lauderdale. “The most troubling aspect of the census is the benchmark categories; none are even close.”



About ASNE


The American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE) is a membership organization for daily newspaper editors, people who serve the editorial needs of daily newspapers (wire service editors, news executives at newspaper companies, people who work for journalism think tanks, etc.) and certain distinguished people who have worked on behalf of editors through the years.

Founded in 1922...ASNE also has several initiatives carried out by its committees.

One of those is through its Diversity Committee: the Newsroom Employment Census, which queries every daily newspaper in the United States to determine the number of news staffers as well as their gender and race. Conducted since 1978, it is the most accurate reflection of the current state of newspaper newsrooms. Issued at the organization's annual convention, it is used extensively by scholars and others for studying newsrooms.
Wiki on ASNE



posted on Feb, 15 2007 @ 04:37 AM
link   
The fact that minorities may have chosen not to enter journalism is a failure of nothing other than some arbitrary benchmarks set up by a group. Perhaps they are choosing to become plumbers instead. Where are the roadblocks?



posted on Feb, 15 2007 @ 09:32 AM
link   

Originally posted by jsobecky
I cannot understand why such a program would ever be considered. There are no roadblocks to blacks in journalism. Why create an artificial situation? It is racist at it's core.


As I said, I believe the intent of the program, at least initially was genuinely good, that being to encourage more participation in the field of journalism from blacks and minorities. There should be a balance of perspective from those who bring us the news, so I applaud the effort. I don't see it as racially motivated, however it could give the perception of reverse discrimination, when as in this case a white student was accepted, then later rejected purely because of race.

I don't think the program itself was racially motivated, as it was simply created to encourage more participation from minorities.

There are many programs, and even employers who operate with racial quotas, and I believe this is part of the core of the racism issue, When a person is hired for a position to fill a racial quota, or a person is excluded from a program, or job opening because of their race, this creates more frustration, and anger, and even encourages racism. Again, I believe the only factors that should be considered are a person's qualifications. Race regardless of which, should never be a factor.

[edit on 15-2-2007 by UM_Gazz]



posted on Feb, 15 2007 @ 09:44 AM
link   

Originally posted by UM_Gazz


There are many programs, and even employers who operate with racial quotas, and I believe this is part of the core of the racism issue, When a person is hired for a position to fill a racial quota, or a person is excluded from a program, or job opening because of their race, this creates more frustration, and anger, and even encourages racism. Again, I believe the only factors that should be considered are a person's qualifications. Race regardless of which, should never be a factor.
[edit on 15-2-2007 by UM_Gazz]


here here!

I am glad they did away with such an obvious racist program such as this. Race should never be a factor in employment. If you are qualified, you get the job, its that simple. I think the federal government needs to do away with race quotas as well.

a step in the right direction.



posted on Feb, 15 2007 @ 03:24 PM
link   

Originally posted by UM_Gazz

Originally posted by jsobecky
I cannot understand why such a program would ever be considered. There are no roadblocks to blacks in journalism. Why create an artificial situation? It is racist at it's core.

I don't think the program itself was racially motivated, as it was simply created to encourage more participation from minorities.
[edit on 15-2-2007 by UM_Gazz]

I agree with the idea of encouraging minorities in journalism, as I believe it provides many benefits, including the fact that there are situations where a person of color can get better information simply because of the color of their skin. I have no problem with that fact.

What I disagree with is excluding other races from the program. That is not only racist and discriminatory, it is downright silly. We all have to live together.

There are so many other ways to encourage minority participation.



posted on Feb, 15 2007 @ 06:48 PM
link   
I agree with you that this program is a great idea to encourage minorities in journalism. I support that 100%.


Originally posted by UM_Gazz
...however it could give the perception of reverse discrimination, when as in this case a white student was accepted, then later rejected purely because of race.


It could give the perception of reverse discrimination? Not only did this action give the perception of reverse discrimination, it downright practiced it.

I think sometimes mistakes like these are necessary to lead us to where we're going, which is (hopefully) true equal treatment.



new topics

top topics



 
7

log in

join