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'The Greatest Conspirator of the 19th Century'

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posted on Feb, 10 2007 @ 01:09 PM
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Filippo Michele Buonarroti.



He apparently received that dubious title by none other than the father of Anarchism, Mikhail Bakunin.

www.cats.ohiou.edu...

He lived from 1761-1837, was the descendant of Michaelango Buonarroti's brothers, was a Jacobin bureaucrat, co-conspirator in the Conspiracy of Equals with Babeuf, and agitated to creat a group called the "Sublime and Perfect Masters of the World", which intended to supersede and coordinate all secret societies in the world, starting with the Italian societies.

Buonarroti's Sublimes also wanted to establish a New Jerusalem amidst the revolutionary chaos. The authorities in europe tried to break up the organization, and failed for a long time unitl one member was caught while acting as a courrier, carrying documents from within the organization's Inner Sanctum, a situation that is nearly identical to the breaking up of the Illuminati in Bavaria not so many years previous.
www.associatedcontent.com...


The Conspiracy of Equals, of which he was three coordinators along with Babeuf, tried to overthrow the Directory (which, it should be noted, had superseded the calamnity that was the Reign of Terror) and establish a dicatatorship in France which would do away with private property. Babeuf was possibly the Illuminati operative code named "Gracchus" (Weishaupt was Spartacus, Knigge was Philo, Zwack was Cato, etc). The Conspiracy of Equals established yet another revolutionary newspaper, the "Tribun du Peuple". After the governmnet shut this group down, members formed "Insurrection Committees", and plotted to overthrow the government by insinuiating members into the army, police, and bureaucracy. Intruigingly, this was to be done through Twelve Agents.


Buonarroti was possibly of ancient Etruscan stock, a people who created a confederacy of city-state republics and kingdoms when the romans were little more than a group of thugs living on ununified hilltop settlements. The family had found an Etruscan tombstone that was kept at their villa of an Etruscan noble/warrior.

The family also makes claims to the Merovingian line through Matilda of Tuscany, 'The Grande Contessa". Note also that the family had connections to various humanists during the renaissance, such as Michaelangelo himself being a student of Francesco da Urbino.

Buonarroti was an agitator while at University, publishing a radical student newspaper called "Gazetta Universale". He went to Corsica to organized support for the French Revolution, which he did through a newspaper called "Giornale Patriottico di Corsica", which was the first Italian language paper to side with the Revolutionaries. He apparently supported Robespierre's Reign of Terror during the revolution, to the point that the Thermidorian Reaction arrested and imprisoned him when it defeated the Reign of Terror.



Auguste Blanqui was one of Buonarrati's ardent followers. He was also a member of the radical secret society, the Carbonari. He is attributed with the social theory of Blanquism, in which a "socialist revolution should be carried out by a relatively small group of highly organised and secretive conspirators". He himself organized multiple violent demonstrations against the succession of governments, popular and otherwise, that occured in France, and even breifly seized power on the anniversary of the ascension of Romulus Augustulus to the emperorship of Rome, October 31 (also, this is Halloween in the United States). Ironically, this agitator went apoplectic and died following a revolutionary speech in Paris.

[edit on 11-2-2007 by Nygdan]




posted on Feb, 10 2007 @ 07:31 PM
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"calamity" Fourth para, second sentance near the end. *ducks*

Anyway, very informative. Lot of reading included, which I have pencilled
into my schedule...wait. I wasn't doing anything tomorrow, anyway.


Thanks for the info !

Lex

Edited : Find my typo. I saw it, but left it for fun.


[edit on 10-2-2007 by Lexion]



posted on Feb, 10 2007 @ 07:49 PM
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I find it fascinating just how involved this guy was in out and out plots using secret societies to overthrow the state and establish a radical dictatorship. And he's not the first one, and not the only one, but it seems to never garner much attention.



posted on Feb, 10 2007 @ 11:56 PM
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The greatest conspirator of the twentieth century is:

the one who writes the book
enoch



posted on Feb, 11 2007 @ 12:11 AM
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The interesting thing is that Buonarroti did write 'the book' on the revolutionary agitations of his time. Later freother radicals ended up heavily influenced by his book and modeled their idea about what those past events were like strongly on his descriptions. This lead to their own conspiracies and revolts.



posted on Feb, 12 2007 @ 03:04 PM
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I still believe Cagliostro is the greatest conspirator of the nineteighnth century, maybe Rasputin



posted on Feb, 12 2007 @ 03:31 PM
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Cagliostro was involved in the monarchy's scandal over a necklace.

Buonarotti was one of the people that overthrew the monarchy and cut their heads off.

And all Rasputin did was ingratiate himself into the court of a bored queen.

This guy actually attempted to direct all secret societies through his Perfect and Sublime Masters of the World. His students took the idea of a revolt and perfected it into a school of political philosophy, and his right hand man was an escaped Illuminati.
He definitely deserves the title.



posted on Feb, 12 2007 @ 03:35 PM
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^^^^^^^^ No argument there, but the "what if" game states what if Rasputin was a Illuminatus who faked his own murder in order to usher in the Bolshevick revolution? Pretty major. The clever Cagliostro was a pawn, a soldier per say in conspiracy who allowed himself to be used. Rasptin also was basically ruling at the time of his "murder"



posted on Feb, 12 2007 @ 03:59 PM
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Originally posted by Count Germails Lovechild
^^^^^^^^ No argument there, but the "what if" game states what if Rasputin was a Illuminatus who faked his own murder in order to usher in the Bolshevick revolution?

But, agian, Buonarotti DID help ignite a reovlution, and did plot with an actual Illuminati, "Gracchus".



posted on Feb, 12 2007 @ 04:28 PM
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i think, then, and don't you agree?

that the ultimate conspirator would have to be the one who gets to the end with the prize necklace in hand?

huh?

turquoise seas in curls of gold?

i think we have a winner folks!



posted on Feb, 12 2007 @ 04:35 PM
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Originally posted by Lexion
Edited : Find my typo. I saw it, but left it for fun.


quack quack
here we sit
to wait for ants

yes you are fun
fun fun fun

eye ewe



posted on Feb, 25 2007 @ 11:58 PM
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Originally posted by queenannie38
i think, then, and don't you agree?

that the ultimate conspirator would have to be the one who gets to the end with the prize necklace in hand?

Odd that you should mention that, when Buonaratti was said to be connected to the Affair of the Necklace



posted on Feb, 26 2007 @ 12:06 AM
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Originally posted by Count Germails Lovechild
I still believe Cagliostro is the greatest conspirator of the nineteighnth century, maybe Rasputin



For what it's worth, I've learned that Cagliostro is a Resurrected Master of the White Lodge, and that Rasputin was a Black Magician.



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