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Quantum computer

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posted on Feb, 13 2007 @ 06:11 PM
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www.abovetopsecret.com...

266677
this is in the post number 666 could this be the mark of the beast's future?
keep people on tabs. Is it a sign? who knows, I say this because I thought it could be used to store all your data actions and movements your actions what ever done in your life on earth. Who knows but it's spooky anyway.




posted on Feb, 14 2007 @ 02:32 AM
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just because one thread on an internet board happens to get 666 in the threadID?

Don't be silly


Besides, 666 as the number on the beast is a modern invention, and everyone knows if you dial up 666 you get three policemen standing on their heads!


There's a bit more info here on d-wave's unveiling: www.theregister.co.uk...

I wonder how far they can scale it to



posted on Feb, 18 2007 @ 06:13 AM
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We have to see if D-Wade is for real.

First of all, they only did an announcement; they did not publically demonstrate their computer.

Secondly, quantum computers can only solve NP problems on a quadratic time instead of double exponential time.



posted on Feb, 18 2007 @ 06:46 AM
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Originally posted by masterp
First of all, they only did an announcement; they did not publically demonstrate their computer.



Originally posted by TheRegister
Few start-ups would have the guts or audacity to unveil their first product at the Computer History Museum. D-Wave Systems, however, did just that today by unveiling the world's most advanced quantum computer - a product that may one day be displayed at the museum as a breakthrough system or simply as a curious relic.

Although based in Burnaby, British Columbia, D-Wave went straight to heart of Silicon Valley to show off the "Orion" system in public for the first time.


Not just an announcement, but a public demonstration



posted on Feb, 20 2007 @ 05:15 AM
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Quantum computers are only useful for a limited number of problems so no need to be overly excited:.


This dramatic advantage of quantum computers has only been discovered for only these three problems so far: factoring, discrete logarithm, and quantum physics simulations.

There are currently no other practical problems known where quantum computers give a large speedup over classical computers. Research is continuing, and more problems may yet be found.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Feb, 20 2007 @ 06:30 AM
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Originally posted by Simon666
Quantum computers are only useful for a limited number of problems so no need to be overly excited:.


That has been completely taken out of context. Quantum computing has so many applications that have major implications it's impossible to list them all.

You need to do more reading up...

The Quantum Computer


All the best,

NeoN HaZe

[edit on 20-2-2007 by Neon Haze]



posted on Feb, 20 2007 @ 07:39 AM
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Originally posted by Wizard_1988
This has good and bad sides. On the good side more research can be done. However this will also have a huge effect on cryptography.


Thar be, on the horizon, Quantum Crytography.

Using fibre optics, they can do some quantummy things to the photon's that travel down the fibre.

If the message is intercepted by anything other than the special quantummy decoder thingy, the message just dissapears. It is only readable by the intended recipient..

(sorry for the "quantummy" choice of word's, but I don't pretend to understand it, I am just aware of it's existence)



posted on Feb, 22 2007 @ 02:38 AM
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Originally posted by Neon Haze
That has been completely taken out of context. Quantum computing has so many applications that have major implications it's impossible to list them all.

You need to do more reading up...

The Quantum Computer

I don't read anything there that refutes what I said, that it only has applications for a limited number of specific problems. Solving those may have major implications, but I didn't doubt that.



posted on Feb, 22 2007 @ 05:14 AM
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Originally posted by Simon666

Originally posted by Neon Haze
That has been completely taken out of context. Quantum computing has so many applications that have major implications it's impossible to list them all.

You need to do more reading up...

The Quantum Computer

I don't read anything there that refutes what I said, that it only has applications for a limited number of specific problems. Solving those may have major implications, but I didn't doubt that.
I agree with you on this. In fact, I'll go one step further and say that the current state of quantum computing is so primitive that most desktop computers can solve quantum problems faster than the current crop of quantum computers, including this one (which I'm still skeptical about)!

It will take some time until we can come up with a quantum computer than can realize the dream of quantum computing, and even then it will be an addition to silicon computers, and not a replacement (kinda like a graphics card, except it would more likely be a quantum encryption card). There will be much more research needed before we can start replacing silicon with quantum computers. We will need the Turings, Dijkstras, Booles, and Hoppers of quantum computing before anyone replaces silicon with quantum.

As far as D-Wave's computer, I'll wait until other field experts review and repeat the research before coming to a conclusion. As of right now, D-Wave's system is a blackbox and I can't be certain someone isn't taking us for a ride. I'll be ecstatic if what they say is true, but I'll wait on my excitement.



posted on Feb, 22 2007 @ 08:23 AM
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I really can't understand why you guys are being so incredibly short sighted.


A classical computer would be able to do anything a quantum computer can. So why bother with quantum computers?

Although a classical computer can theoretically simulate a quantum computer, it is incredibly inefficient, so much so that a classical computer is effectively incapable of performing many tasks that a quantum computer could perform with ease.

The simulation of a quantum computer on a classical one is a computationally hard problem because the correlations among quantum bits are qualitatively different from correlations among classical bits, as first explained by John Bell.

Take for example a system of only a few hundred qubits, this exists in a Hilbert space of dimension ~10^90 that in simulation would require a classical computer to work with exponentially large matrices (to perform calculations on each individual state, which is also represented as a matrix), meaning it would take an exponentially longer time than even a primitive quantum computer.


The figures speak for themselves...


For example,

A system of 500 qubits, which is impossible to simulate classically, represents a quantum superposition of as many as 2500 states.

Each state would be classically equivalent to a single list of 500 1's and 0's.

Hence with one fell swoop, one tick of the computer clock, a quantum operation could compute not just on one machine state, as serial computers do, but on 2500 machine states at once!


Text Extracts taken from the link I provided in my earlier post...

There is no arguing that a 16qBit system can be out preformed by modern classical systems.

The potential computational power of a quantum computer can be applied to a great many processes including standard number crunching tasks that would normally require the equivalent of years of computer processor time and cut it down to days if not hours.

However, having said all that, the real question as I have cited earlier is not how many computational states you can reach. It's how many cycles per second you can tune a system to perform.

Best regards,

NeoN HaZe.



posted on Feb, 23 2007 @ 03:59 PM
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I hear ya 100% Neon. The implications of the potential processing power of a quantum computer in just mind blowing.
I'm absolutely ecstatic on the announcement of this prototype, i can already see the future when we have a system with 1000qbits by end of next year...maybe 10000 by the next, i can now start to see how we could possibly reach a technological singularity or omega point within the next 6 years

could this be the beginning or our path to creating such science fiction type technologies such as time travel, teleportation and even a matrix type environment similar to what we could already be in, a simulation of reality ??





[edit on 23-2-2007 by MouldyCrumpet]



posted on Feb, 23 2007 @ 04:22 PM
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That has been completely taken out of context. Quantum computing has so many applications that have major implications it's impossible to list them all.


Neon Haze,

I have a question.

I have read some articles and heard some guest on C2C talking about quantum computers and how close or far we are from having them and what they will be able to do.

So my question is once you get a quantum computer regardless of its size or power cant you "ask" it to design a better more powerful quantum computer then with the next one do the same so you kind of have this exponential growth in the evolution of a quantum computer?



posted on Feb, 23 2007 @ 09:23 PM
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Originally posted by Neon Haze
I am awaiting news with baited breath...

If this is an actual working computer then there must be some major advancements in screening outside influence...

With 16 Q-bits this computer will be able to perform 64'000 operations simultaneously.

I realise this will only be a demonstrations but my questions would be how many cycles a second this baby will perform...

Although this is a far cry from the worlds number one super computer… the IBM BlueGene Linpack e-server can perform 280.6 teraflops a second using some 131072 processors…

However.. this is a demo of a computer with just 16 qbits….

Here is an image of the q-bits that will be used.



If you want to learn more about how this stuff works.. here is a white paper written by D-wave themselves.

Sign and Magnitude Tunable Coupler for Superconducting Flux Qubits

You can follow the progress live through D-waves Blog.

D-Wave Quantum Computer Demo Blog

Enjoy.

All the best,

NeoN HaZe



WOW MILTON KEYNES from google earth did not know that we go into a quantum world when we entre it. I also read that they are going to make an 80 core due type processor too with 80 different seperate processes.



posted on Feb, 23 2007 @ 09:52 PM
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This thread has gone so far over my head it's not even funny



A Quantum computer sure sounds incredible, just how expensive
are they going to be?



posted on Feb, 23 2007 @ 10:12 PM
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Nice post
and thakns for all the links this is really informative. Can you guess at the kind of passwords/keys that will be created?



posted on Feb, 23 2007 @ 11:36 PM
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Originally posted by Neon Haze
I really can't understand why you guys are being so incredibly short sighted.

-snip-

Text Extracts taken from the link I provided in my earlier post...

There is no arguing that a 16qBit system can be out preformed by modern classical systems.

The potential computational power of a quantum computer can be applied to a great many processes including standard number crunching tasks that would normally require the equivalent of years of computer processor time and cut it down to days if not hours.

However, having said all that, the real question as I have cited earlier is not how many computational states you can reach. It's how many cycles per second you can tune a system to perform.

Best regards,

NeoN HaZe.
I have a feeling that was directed at myself and others who are skeptical of D-Wave's promises regarding their quantum computer.

It's not that we're being shortsighted or that we don't even see the promise of quantum computing. It's just that we're not going to jump the gun on something until other people have verified D-Wave's technique.

Besides, I think all of us are excited about the promises of quantum computing, and some of us--myself included--have some understanding of the promises therein. However, for the foreseeable future, quantum computers are going to be limited in their application because not only are quantum computers a huge leap in power, they're also a huge leap in complexity. The simplicity of boolean logic used with current silicon hardware is a luxury that we won't have on quantum computers. Even understanding the concept of qubits doesn't make writing quantum computing algorithms any easier.

With the boolean logic, I could actually hand code all the ones and zeroes for an application, and I've actually done so for a class (they were extremely simple, of course, but I don't recommend it as a pastime). Something like that can't be done nearly so easily on a quantum computer. It's hard enough to write parallelized applications, and quantum computers have that in spades. Until we have a good grounding in writing quantum computing algorithms like we do now for silicon-based computers, quantum computers aren't going to take over, even if D-Wave's technology does pan out, and someone figures out how to mass produce it.

[edit on 2/23/2007 by supercheetah]



posted on Feb, 24 2007 @ 12:34 AM
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Quantum computing was and is an exciting develpment the moment it worked. Here is a question; what happens if a quantum probablility computation connects with a probable quantum computer? I mean, the whole idea of superimposition presupposes several probable computers working in tandem with each other - is this not weird? Such that there are other probable results from other superimpositioned computers? In the "Many Worlds" interpretation there are indeed other computers working on the same problems, it s just that they are only ever "probable" as compared to "our" actuality. It's not that we could communicate with these other probabilities, but that we actually are deriving results from precisely these other probabilities. So the question remains, are other probable computers deriving results from these probablility computations?



posted on Feb, 24 2007 @ 05:42 AM
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Originally posted by The time lord

WOW MILTON KEYNES from google earth did not know that we go into a quantum world when we entre it. I also read that they are going to make an 80 core due type processor too with 80 different separate processes.

I will be back to input on some of the questions that have arisen here, but for now I thought it would be fun to add some humour


For those that don't know... this is Milton Keynes




There is even a chip in production that will run at one teraflop… Linear processes used.

Will be back in a bit.

All the best,

NeoN HaZe.


[edit on 24-2-2007 by Neon Haze]



posted on Feb, 24 2007 @ 08:38 AM
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With the boolean logic, I could actually hand code all the ones and zeroes for an application, and I've actually done so for a class (they were extremely simple, of course, but I don't recommend it as a pastime). Something like that can't be done nearly so easily on a quantum computer. It's hard enough to write parallelized applications, and quantum computers have that in spades. Until we have a good grounding in writing quantum computing algorithms like we do now for silicon-based computers, quantum computers aren't going to take over, even if D-Wave's technology does pan out, and someone figures out how to mass produce it.


I can relate to this loading all routines into a microprocessor using assembly...really time consuming.

load stack A with $EF00
Add A+B
..
..
..

its all coming back now



posted on Feb, 24 2007 @ 04:20 PM
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OK so correct me if im wrong but would a quantum computer work like this?

it can calculate years worth of data in hours.

so say 4 hours for 3 years work, we get in 1 day of calculations 18 years worth of data crunching? so now do a years worth = 6570 years worth of data crunch ok now do 5 years = 33750 years worth and so on an on and on.

now with quantum computers doing that amont of data crunch they would be able to improove themselves and make better quantum computers on a yearly basis yes?? so each year they would be able to do more crunch in less time so 33750 would take only 2 an half years after generation 2 of quantum comps, gen 3 1 an a bit years, gen 4 7 months, and in 5th year gen 5 it take 3 months for same data now.


would quantum computer be able to use entire knowledge of human race, would it be self aware by then, there would be nothing it wouldnt be able to do would there if it had entire knowledge of our civilization??? it could invent new things for us, make sci-fi come true time travel, teleportation, who knows but they can only get better and better there must be some point were they cant get any better but what point is that point????

is a quantum computer limited by how fast we can input data into it??

would we use a quantum computer to invent faster than light data input??


also while im thinking of it how long would it take an indivual to look at the entire internet.

also could we use a quantum computer to invent a quantum dimensional storage area?



[edit on 24-2-2007 by blobby]



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