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Parents 'Blind' To There Childrens Weight

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posted on Feb, 5 2007 @ 06:11 PM
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Researchers with Deakin's Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research surveyed more than 1200 families to find out if parents had concerns about their children's weight and if they took any preventative action to avoid obesity in their children.

The study of more than 1100 families found that 89 per cent of parents of overweight 5—6 year-olds and 63 per cent of parents of overweight 10—12 year-olds were unaware their child was overweight. It also revealed that 71 per cent of parents of overweight 5—6 year-olds and 43 per cent of parents with overweight 10—12 year-olds did not think their child's weight was a problem.

Professor Crawford said it was not altogether surprising that many parents were unaware their child was overweight given that "many adults are not able to recognise overweight in themselves."

He suggested that some reasons for the lack of recognition of childhood overweight could be that some parents, particularly mothers, tend to judge overweight by whether or not their child is teased about their weight at school or has developed limitations in physical activity; or that, with childhood obesity becoming increasingly normative, that some excess weight simply goes unnoticed.


SOURCE:
Physorg.com


This really is'nt surprising to me, as I have noticd this myself.

Cae in point, there was recently a story on CNN about schools in a
state putting BMI's on kids report cards, and adding notices to par-
ents about the kid being overweight.
The woman they interviewed was pissy about it, and said her
daughter was'nt, and the little girl was so obviously overweight it
was'nt funny.


Comments, Opinions?




posted on Feb, 14 2007 @ 02:26 AM
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The message isn't getting through to people. Lots of food out there is junk. Kids today don't even know the difference between real hunger and a simple craving for sweets. I work in a supermarket, and i'll see kids ask for something sugary or fattening every four feet or so as they move down the aisle. The parents will absentmindedly nod and just say "Sure, go for it". Moderation has been hurled out the window. People'll eat what they want, when they want, and usually in disgusting amounts.



posted on Feb, 14 2007 @ 02:36 AM
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Another big problem is that many of these adults are overweight themselves, and they are vicariously defending their own habits by defending their childs habits. Adults are often even more reluctant than children to change their habits after so many years of addiction to terrible foods and drinks, and what the parent does, the child will usually do.

However, I saw that story on CNN as well, and that child was not that overweight in my opinion. I have seen kids that are much bigger at the same age just by watching the bus stop near my house.



posted on Feb, 14 2007 @ 02:44 AM
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Well, I know parents dont hardly prepare real food anymore and that stuff you buy at fast food restaurants is about pure fat. This has been an increasing problem with fathers and mothers working, no parent has time to prepare a meal.

The best advice is to stay away from fast food when possible. Even a sandwhich is better than fast food stuff.

I try to eat steamed vegetables and rice quite a bit, even though they say plain white rice is fattening as well but I prefer it. I think the problem has been that the worlds eating habbits are still based in a time of scarcity when there is no longer scarcity in most of the developed world. We need to change our eating habbits to suit the situation. It is no longer necessary to have a meal with multiple sides, etc. We need to reduce our proportions. I am also a believer that 3 meals a day is a bit too much.

I love soft drinks, but they are a major source of the problem. Parents need to stress drinking water more.







[edit on 14-2-2007 by XphilesPhan]



posted on Feb, 19 2007 @ 01:44 AM
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Originally posted by iori_komei
This really is'nt surprising to me, as I have noticd this myself.

Cae in point, there was recently a story on CNN about schools in a
state putting BMI's on kids report cards, and adding notices to par-
ents about the kid being overweight.
The woman they interviewed was pissy about it, and said her
daughter was'nt, and the little girl was so obviously overweight it
was'nt funny.

Comments, Opinions?


I don't think schools need to be weighing our children and sending home BMI information on report cards. I also don't think junk food or soda needs to be banned at schools. Just because little Johnny is way over weight doesn't mean my active child can't enjoy an indulgence with his lunch. My little guy is always on the low side of BMI and comes out as just barely above the "underweight" category ... I still don't want to see that info on his report card.

I know that soda has become the "evil" of all drinks within the last few years. Many school districts have taken steps to ban soda on their sites. However fruit jucies with at least 50% juice is allowed ... that stuff is just as bad as the soda. Take a look at the label ... almost identical levels of calories and sugars per 8oz serving, even for 100% cranberry juice. What is it that makes soda evil but not apple juice??



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