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Are we heading into a new Ice Age?

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posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 04:50 PM
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I was once told that when the oceanic conveyer stops, we go into another Ice Age. With the polar ice caps melting, I've been told that this will stop the current. Has anyone else heard this? Is it true?




posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 05:33 PM
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Originally posted by JessicaS
I was once told that when the oceanic conveyer stops, we go into another Ice Age. With the polar ice caps melting, I've been told that this will stop the current. Has anyone else heard this? Is it true?


If you plan on being around 30-50,000 years, then I would say there's a 99.99% chance you will experience a new ice age.

Otherwise, it's highly debatable and there's little data that says we are cooling off anytime soon:
The global cooling myth RealClimate

The UK Met Office has been pretty accurate for the last 7 years:
2007 to be 'warmest on record' BBC



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 05:50 PM
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I heard that on Inconvenient Truth (the Al Gore movie). If you haven't watched it, you might want to check it out. It's not as bad as everyone says, IMO.

With Global Warming though, I would have to agree with Regenmacher, that is many, many years away.

Though I often wonder with a change in all the climates, could it change the climate of a specific region. Like snow in the Sahara, and droughts in the rainforests? If all the other climates are changing isn't it possible these climates can change as well? Just a thought.



posted on Feb, 1 2007 @ 07:27 AM
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"...when the oceanic conveyer stops"



I don't know where I've heard this, but isn't there some concern that the Gulf Stream is weakening? Is that a part of the oceanic conveyer?



Meanwhile back at the frozen tundra, looks like our Yeti friends are planning to come to town...





posted on Feb, 1 2007 @ 10:26 AM
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Originally posted by JessicaS
I was once told that when the oceanic conveyer stops, we go into another Ice Age. With the polar ice caps melting, I've been told that this will stop the current. Has anyone else heard this? Is it true?


This idea was popularised in recent years by the film 'Day After Tomorrow'

The truth is, although this film had its basis in science fact... the film took this and then added Hollywood science magic to create a dramatic film.

"What is the science fact" I hear you say...

Here in Britain we are roughly on the same latitude as Canada and Siberia... But thanks to the warming effects of the Gulf Stream Britain is kept temperate.



However, if the Gulf Stream were ever to be disturbed, cold air would indeed push down and Britain would find itself in a deep freeze...

Alarm over dramatic weakening of Gulf Stream

The Greenland Ice Sheet is comprised of fresh water and is melting at an alarming rate... caused by global warming... Global warming is now in a run away effect caused by the lessening of Global dimming....

Now... the fresh water dilutes the saline solution that is the Arctic Ocean and this stops the warm water circulating....

The Gulf Stream has been measured to be reducing at a rate of about 30% over the last 12 years....

At that rate it would be completely no existent in less than one quartet of a century...

What's more is that when one looks upon matters of nature and the environment, one this is very clear.... There are far too many variables to be able to come up with anything better than attempting to read a trend.

A true accurate forecast of what will happen is something that is so far beyond our capabilities that even the worlds fastest computers could spend thousands of years running simulations and still get it wrong.....

The sun has been shown to be a major cause of ice ages on the earth, with mini Ice ages happening roughly every 100'000 years.. Though this is by no means a set time frame. The last Ice Age ended 10,000 years ago…

The Sun’s Chilly Impact on Earth

All the best,

NeoN HaZe.


[edit on 1-2-2007 by Neon Haze]



posted on Feb, 1 2007 @ 10:30 AM
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friday we will get that new global repot, and we will see what the climate scientists say. so threadstarter lets just read the report tomorrow.

i am sure there will be a big fuss over it.

on things like ice age in europe, it takes alot of factors to go that way. the truth is no one really knows.



posted on Feb, 1 2007 @ 10:37 AM
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Originally posted by dirty_underground
Though I often wonder with a change in all the climates, could it change the climate of a specific region. Like snow in the Sahara, and droughts in the rainforests? If all the other climates are changing isn't it possible these climates can change as well? Just a thought.


it has actually been snowing in Tuscon Arizona I believe. I also heard that the Saguaro cactii are starting to die from the cold. So, in a sentance, yes, I think it can affect localized regions.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Feb, 1 2007 @ 12:29 PM
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It snows in parts of the Sonoran desert every winter. Snow won't hurt saguaros, it's a hard freeze that they don't tolerate too well. Urbanization and people stealing them for their yards is the biggest threat to saguaros. Mt. Lemmon, Tucson has a ski resort too.

Cave Creek, Arizona just north of Pheonix:
March 2006 snow and cactus photos

It's 46 in Tucson as I post this and will be in the 70's by next week.

____________________________

The Gulf Stream Myth columbia.edu
Ocean Circulation: New evidence (Yes), slowdown (No) Real Climate
False Alarm: Atlantic Conveyor Belt Hasn't Slowed Down After All AAAS


The Source of Europe's Mild Climate - American Scientist
The notion that the Gulf Stream is responsible for keeping Europe anomalously warm turns out to be a myth

Because sea-surface temperatures vary less through the seasonal cycle than do land-surface temperatures, any place where the wind blows from off the ocean will have relatively mild winters and cool summers. Both the British Isles and the Pacific Northwest enjoy such "maritime" climates. Central Asia, the northern Great Plains and Canadian Prairies are classic examples of "continental" climates, which do not benefit from this moderating effect and thus experience bitterly cold winters and blazingly hot summers. The northeastern United States and eastern Canada fall somewhere in between. But because they are under the influence of prevailing winds that blow from west to east, their climate is considerably more continental than maritime.

What we found in these tests was that, south of northern Norway, the difference in winter temperature across the North Atlantic was always the same, whether or not we let the ocean move heat around. This result would suggest that oceanic heat transport does not matter at all to the difference between the winter climates of western Europe and eastern North America! We concluded that the temperature difference must, as we had speculated before, be caused by other processes, most likely the seasonal absorption and release of heat by the ocean and the moderating effect this process has on maritime climates downwind.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.

Lots more here: ATS: Atlantic Current Halted In 2004


[edit on 1-2-2007 by Regenmacher]



posted on Feb, 1 2007 @ 12:37 PM
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That's good to know that the saguaro will be around longer. Sorry to de-rail the thread. Back to gulf streams and ocean currents.



posted on Feb, 3 2007 @ 08:24 AM
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so... i'm confused.. are the currents actually slowing enough to cause one in our lifetimes?



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