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Germany Takes Action, Issues Warrants to Arrest 13 CIA Agents

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posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 11:28 AM
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The US authorities is not cooperating, but the procecutor's office in Munich is working to disclose the true identities of 13 CIA agents known by their code names. They are wanted in the abduction case of Khaled al-Masri, a German national of Lebanese descent, who was abducted by US agents in the Macedonian capital, Skopje, on 31 December 2003 and brought to Afghanistan and tortured. Five month later they found he was the wrong man and flew him to Albania for realese. Masri sued the US government over his detention, but in May a judge dismissed a lawsuit he filed against the CIA, citing national security considerations. His case is an example of the US policy of "extraordinary rendition" - a practice whereby the US government flies foreign terror suspects to third countries without judicial process for interrogation or detention. A statement from the court says the warrants was issued on suspicion of abduction and grievous bodily harm, based on information provided from Mr Masri's lawyers and a journalist and officials in Spain, where the flight used in the abduction is thought to have originated.
 



www.washingtonpost.com
BERLIN, Jan. 31 -- German prosecutors on Wednesday said they have issued arrest warrants for 13 CIA operatives suspected of kidnapping a German citizen in the Balkans in 2004 and taking him to a secret prison in Afghanistan before realizing several months later that they had the wrong person.

The German arrest warrants, filed in Munich, are the second case in which prosecutors have filed criminal charges against CIA employees involved in counterterrorism operations in Europe. European investigators acknowledge that it is highly unlikely the U.S. spies -- most of whom worked undercover or using false identities -- would ever be handed over to face trial. But the prosecutions have strained U.S.-European relations and underscored deep differences over how to fight terrorism.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.



Thank God for the difference, then bashers of patriotism and mongers of war can think what they like and call this bushbashing. But you don't treat people like that just on "a hunch" and suspecion of a forged passport.

The El-Masri case ought to be known by an informed American public, and thus to some members here on ATS. At least one thread I found, and understand Masri in press for a while got some exposure, when he first brought his story. In short it's a case about confused identities and operatives too stupid and stuborn to admit a failure and with a whole other view on human nature than most in our part of the world is used to. Khalid El-Masri's story in whole can be read on the Wiki.

I sincerely hope they get those agents and put them to justice. It might be a vain hope, but at least they can't operate or do vacation in Europe anymore.

It's with a kind of grief I watch the polarization in core values like this case shows, taking place between U$ and Euro these years... such as what is right to do to people when they're suspects, and what is NOT... --to take one year to get a German passport verified is definitely not all right.

What worries me in particular is that those differencies sooner or later will manifest in the common set of values in spiritual, social and mental ways that will affect politics between the new and the old world ...and I'm afraid they'll became very nasty.

I think it is good Germany takes a stance on this case. When the US refuses to acknowledge international bodies and they themselves see international law only as by them defined, I say ban the bunch through liable suits.

Related News Links:
news.bbc.co.uk
www.iht.com

Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
Apologize to El-Masri!




posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 02:26 PM
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So let me get this straight, all this means is that these 13 CIA agents whose true identities not even know (yet) cannot go to Germany for fear of being prosecuted by people that still don't know who they are or where they are?



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 03:33 PM
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This started in 2005 when an Italian judge gave the warrants first, so it has been going on for a while.

I only can guess that is so easy for these agents to go into another countries and kidnap people at will.

Interesting, US will never give away their names.



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 03:43 PM
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The US shouldn't give away their names. They were doing what they were commanded to do. And the EU knew about the flights, even though they like to pretend they didn't.



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 03:49 PM
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I've got to agree. We shouldn't give out the name's of men and women whom as far as we know simply obeyed their orders. The one's we should be giving up (and the one's the Germans should want) is whoever ordered this little operation. Along with an investigation into the European Union which allowed such flights to occur. There's a lot that needs investigating here, and I get the feeling it extends much farther than 13 agents.



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 03:52 PM
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www.abovetopsecret.com...

[edit on 31/1/2007 by shooterbrody]



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 04:11 PM
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If the 13 agents cited in the warrant can't be found, Germany should have the right to kidnap and render any known and identifiable CIA staff...or just any plain US citizen who happens to cross their border for that matter, hold them without trial and 'humanely torture' them until their identities are revealed, or any other useable information is forthcoming...it would take all of about 10 seconds for the US embassy to start screaming human-rights violations



[edit on 31-1-2007 by citizen smith]



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 04:42 PM
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If the 13 agents cited in the warrant can't be found, Germany should have the right to kidnap and render any known and identifiable CIA staff...or just any plain US citizen who happens to cross their border for that matter, hold them without trial and 'humanely torture' them until their identities are revealed, or any other useable information is forthcoming...it would take all of about 10 seconds for the US embassy to start screaming human-rights violations


yeah, and 10 bucks says the germans or any other euros for that matter hasnt the guts to try that.
We might just have to "liberate" them as well.

[edit on 31-1-2007 by XphilesPhan]



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 05:03 PM
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There are a couple of US nationals studying at my university, perhaps in the cause of prevention of terrorism I should invite them to stay in my basement for a few months, after all they could just be as equally guilty of acting for the Bush regime and plotting acts of terrorism as Mr. Al-Masri was alleged of Al Queda..only a few months of psychological techniques will prove their innocense, after that they may be free to go, and of course, as I will be acting in the public interest, they won't have any recourse to sue...

...sound ridicolous? of course it is, just as kidnapping any johnny-brown-skin off the street will get you information which will lead you to the leadership of Al-Queda



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 05:08 PM
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Originally posted by XphilesPhan
We might just have to "liberate" them as well.


We might just have to. One of my favorite pieces of legislation, The Hague Invasion Act. Protecting US citizens from unaccountable international bureaucracy since 2002.




[edit on 31-1-2007 by WestPoint23]



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 05:48 PM
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Look, we should just give this guy ten million dollars and let him be on his way so we can let everyone move on. Our agents have work to do, we cannot compromise our national security for one case of mistaken identity.



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 06:19 PM
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Originally posted by DYepes
Look, we should just give this guy ten million dollars and let him be on his way so we can let everyone move on.


Hey that is pocket money to some of the American companies CEOs, let bush friends pay for law sues.

BTW he is not first one "mistaken identity" and I think that, what we, will be facing as a nation is an increased hostilities against our operatives abroad, when the citizens of those countries start asking their governments why they are not protecting them.



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 07:14 PM
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Originally posted by citizen smith
If the 13 agents cited in the warrant can't be found, Germany should have the right to kidnap and render any known and identifiable CIA staff...or just any plain US citizen who happens to cross their border for that matter, hold them without trial and 'humanely torture' them until their identities are revealed, or any other useable information is forthcoming...it would take all of about 10 seconds for the US embassy to start screaming human-rights violations


Wouldn't that be sweet. Personally I would rather just see these 13 individuals disappear for good only once they've suffered the same if not more torture as the original victim. I'd pay to see that
But I like your idea too, eye for any eye.

brill

[edit on 31-1-2007 by brill]



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 07:32 PM
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Originally posted by XphilesPhan

If the 13 agents cited in the warrant can't be found, Germany should have the right to kidnap and render any known and identifiable CIA staff...or just any plain US citizen who happens to cross their border for that matter, hold them without trial and 'humanely torture' them until their identities are revealed, or any other useable information is forthcoming...it would take all of about 10 seconds for the US embassy to start screaming human-rights violations


yeah, and 10 bucks says the germans or any other euros for that matter hasnt the guts to try that.
We might just have to "liberate" them as well.

[edit on 31-1-2007 by XphilesPhan]

Exactly what I fear. Not so much the "liberation" as the war it would take.



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 07:46 PM
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These 13 plus the ones in Italy. I wonder if anything came of the Italian warrants placed on those CIA agents? Some people suggested paying of Al-Masri, well its probably just cheaper to give these guys a new home, new name, new id's and to just play like they don't know who the Euros are talking about.



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 08:05 PM
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Originally posted by DYepes
Look, we should just give this guy ten million dollars and let him be on his way so we can let everyone move on. Our agents have work to do, we cannot compromise our national security for one case of mistaken identity.


It's not about national security. Sure, it should be investigated more and the person(s) who ordered the operation should be more at fault then anyone else. BUT, the fact remains - Our own government, stubbornly, won't apologize. THAT's the major problem.



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 08:17 PM
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Hi There,

I am so disgusted and angry with the way this man was treated by these AMERICANS, that this post will be short...

Have a crap day!



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 08:34 PM
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Nothing will be done about this. Unfortunately for the majority of the worlds citizens, the government makes it's own rules and says tough cookies if you don't like them. Lets be serious here. How are they going to identify and arrest 13 CIA agents when no one could possibly know who they are? These are people who aren't acknoledged even in death. All they get is a nice shiny star in Langley, VA. No name, no nothing. With the current administration, any kind of compromise is all but impossible. This is the dirty little secret that has been going on for years. It's just that the international community is getting tired but really have no recourse.



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 08:43 PM
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Originally posted by Infra_red
Lets be serious here. How are they going to identify and arrest 13 CIA agents when no one could possibly know who they are? These are people who aren't acknoledged even in death. All they get is a nice shiny star in Langley, VA. No name, no nothing. With the current administration, any kind of compromise is all but impossible. This is the dirty little secret that has been going on for years. It's just that the international community is getting tired but really have no recourse.


Well the guy was with them for a total of 5 months so he must have overheard someones name being dropped unless at that point they were using pseudonyms. They will still issue the warrants under those names or maybe even John Does. The government knows who was involved but wether they will give them up is another story. I think we will have to wait for a change in government before that happens. You know Bush will weasle his way out of it.



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 09:18 PM
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Ah the amusement continues, people don't yet realize that this German move is largely symbolic. It is very unrealistic that the people in charge will be caught, and there is ZERO chance of them being "turned in". Not to mention the whole legal process of such a thing... anyway if it makes you sleep better at night keep thing this has teeth.

Also I like that bit about "overhearing" names, I just want to say however that he wasn't held by the Boy Scouts.



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