It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Intel IBM announce major transistor technology breakthrough

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 27 2007 @ 11:26 AM
link   
Engineers at Intel and IBM have separately annouced the successful development of a new semi-conductor material.

Transistor Breakthrough

Gordon Moore famous for co-founding Intel and theorizing Moore's Law claims that this is the biggest change in transistor technology in 40yrs.

Wow this is just incredible. Academics had been wondering how long Moore's law would continue(it has already slowed down). But this could once again kick computer technology advances into overdrive. Can't wait till I can simulate realistic nuclear strikes, protein model and decode my genome in the time it takes to cook a hot pocket.




posted on Jan, 27 2007 @ 11:54 AM
link   
This is most Excellent!

However, correct me if I am off base here, but isn't this breakthrough mostly about reducing heat and energy usage.

While this should allow for some "cool" overclocking - I am not sure this will do much for Moore's Law.

I believe that keeping up with Moore's Law basically requires that more and more transistors be put on the chip - and I do not know that changing from silicon to this new metal is really going to help them do much more minaturation.

I would thus presume that quantum computing will probably still be the best (and most powerful) way to continue increasing processing power.

However - Moore power to them! - I've always been an Intel fanboy


(AMD/ATI is teh sux0r, yo!)



posted on Jan, 27 2007 @ 01:08 PM
link   
This reduction in heat and power consumption means that you can have a powerful processor in your mobile devices, instead of reducing the clock speed to the point where it's about as powerful as an earlier model pentium, which is what happens with alot of the laptops today.

If using this metal, instead of the usual silicon dioxide means a more expensive manufacturing cost, then chances are this will remain restricted to expensive mobile devices, and those who wish to overclock a desktop or server to incredible speeds.

Your standard desktop will be the last to see the change.

I did notice one thing that was wierd about the news article... near the start it mentions this will help them defeat Advanced Micro (AMD)... but then near the end of the article it mentions that AMD is actually one of the research partners.
??? If they are in on the designs... how is this supposed to help Intel defeat AMD?
Did I miss something?

[edit on 27-1-2007 by johnsky]



posted on Jan, 27 2007 @ 02:18 PM
link   

Originally posted by TruthMagnet
While this should allow for some "cool" overclocking - I am not sure this will do much for Moore's Law.

I believe that keeping up with Moore's Law basically requires that more and more transistors be put on the chip - and I do not know that changing from silicon to this new metal is really going to help them do much more minaturation.


This technology will also allow for the development of much smaller transistors which might not have been possible with silicone based technology.

Moore's Law extended



posted on Jan, 27 2007 @ 02:24 PM
link   

Originally posted by johnsky
I did notice one thing that was wierd about the news article... near the start it mentions this will help them defeat Advanced Micro (AMD)... but then near the end of the article it mentions that AMD is actually one of the research partners.
??? If they are in on the designs... how is this supposed to help Intel defeat AMD? Did I miss something?


Yeah the whole part about IBM's development being independent of Intel's. IBM was partnering with AMD, Toshiba and Sony in compettion with Intel.


IBM has worked on developing the material for about a decade and its partners in the research were Advanced Micro, Sony Corp. and Toshiba Corp. The material was developed at IBM's labs in New York state, Meyerson said.


apc

posted on Jan, 27 2007 @ 09:34 PM
link   
Jesus I hope you mean lean pocket...


This will trickle through eventually. At present rate though I wouldn't be surprised to see commercial implementation by the end of the decade.



posted on Jan, 28 2007 @ 03:47 PM
link   

Originally posted by apc
Jesus I hope you mean lean pocket...


You're not making a comment on my weight are you? Are my characters pudgy?


Originally posted by apc
This will trickle through eventually. At present rate though I wouldn't be surprised to see commercial implementation by the end of the decade.


Yeah hopefully you're right. I think that it won't take to long to reach commercial status as its obviously not classified technology and it does seem to me that high technology products don't take nearly as much time as they used to to reach the market.



new topics

top topics



 
0

log in

join