cacheing in the city

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posted on Jan, 29 2007 @ 02:37 PM
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I understand to what you are alluding in your post. You want to have some supplys stashed sufficient for a few days ...enought to determine if you must leave or not. You also want them available for some time ..pre positioned ..on the ready line...Not taken or stolen by the local "wildlife.

Hence my position about camoflaguing them or constructing some kind of secret hiding place. While I am not in an apartment or such I do have certain supplies which I maintain and roate out as the dates come up.

I do know to keep certain supplies on hand. You dont want to be stocking up just before an event as it is very likely as you stated the shelves/cupbords will be bare. YOu definitely want to already have your position in supplies established.

For example..I always keep batteries on hand around here...at least a 40 pack of AAs if not 2 forty packs..also packs of D cells. Just before a hurricane ...the shelves are bare...very quickly. I do the same with the Coleman fuel in the gallon containers for my pump up camp stoves. Also bottled gas. These supplys disappear very quickly from the stores. You want to have certain positions like this established well ahead of certain situations. Enough to give you a edge over others who dont prepare for anything outside of tonights game.

Watch how many people this coming week will be making plans and preparations for the bowel game/party...but no plans for survival caches...or bug out bag. See what I mean?? I have little to no sympathy for these people. In a bug out situation they will be a huge liability.

While the Bowel game is going on I will be out in the stores catching up on my shopping...after kick off time. Very intresting to me how the traffic on the streets dies out after kick off time for the Super Bowel. I never watch sports. Very little of intrest in it to me.

IN the citys and apartments you need to think through how to camoflague your stash/cache..or bug out bag.

Thanks,
Orangetom




posted on Jan, 30 2007 @ 06:36 AM
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Well I guess people did not get what I was trying to put across. I lived in the city years ago when I was working and I had a minimum bob that was always with me. The thing is that what you can carry to work is sometimes very limited and thinking that you’ll be able to get back home is a one way ticket to the grave. In many cases of sit x you will not be allowed free travel within the city and in worst case you may have no home to get back to. So I guess what I was getting at is where you could hide stuff to get you by until you got away from the city and to an offsite rendezvous point (if you have family, friends, or cohorts you should have an out of the way meeting place to gather before you trek on to…?) I never worried much about this as I worked for the phone co and had a big official truck and was allowed by police and fire to go without hassle, also there are tons of phone co buildings in some really out of the way places and I had the keys. So, you’re at work and a fecal/impeller impact occurs you got what you got on you now what?



posted on Jan, 30 2007 @ 01:46 PM
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The first problem is how many people even think the way we are posting here on the survival thread?? My guess is more than 95% do not ever think about this. These people are going to be a huge liability.

For me my daily bag I take to work will have to do since I also carry bottled water in it and a few food stuffs. A change of socks and tee shirt. Magazines, two lighters, magnifying glass, sewing supplies. etc etc. All in a backpack.
My last plan is to acquire a more compact 2 meter FM walkie talkie. Amazing how small they are making these 2 way radios today. Well the same could be said for cell phones. THey are making them amazingly small. My current walkie talkie is olde and bulky.
I also carry AM/FM short wave radios receivers and batteries.
This bag goes with me every day to work and home ..whether in my car or truck or on my moped.

However..you do bring up a good point..what if access to ones neighborhood was closed off by the main roads..how would one get home. I will have to give some consideration to this obvious possibility. Thanks for this tip. I will break out my city maps for alternate routes.

As I have stated ...how many people will have planned for over a month for the bowel game partys but not for their survival. I dont even know where the game will be played this coming weekend. Nor whom is playing. No matter ..I wont be watching it.

THanks,
Orangetom



posted on Jan, 30 2007 @ 02:28 PM
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Might I suggest instead of a 2m radio a multibander instead. I have three Yaesu VX-5's. These are a 90's model (there are newer versions) but are feature-packed in a very small (4" x 1.5" x 2" less antenna) package. They can be had for around $200. They xmit on 6m, 2m and 70cm (430MHz) bands but are general coverage receivers (shortwave to UHF) that include Wx, broadcast, aviation, marine and public service frequencies. They have all the bells and whistles and are rugged little suckers.


[edit on 30-1-2007 by jtma508]



posted on Jan, 30 2007 @ 02:46 PM
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Originally posted by jtma508
Might I suggest instead of a 2m radio a multibander instead. I have three Yaesu VX-5's. These are a 90's model (there are newer versions) but are feature-packed in a very small (4" x 1.5" x 2" less antenna) package. They xmit on 6m, 2m and 70cm (430MHz) bands but are general coverage receivers (shortwave to UHF) that include Wx, broadcast, aviation, marine and public service frequencies. They have all the bells and whistles and are rugged little suckers.


You are correct. I did not state clearly. Minimum I want is a dual bander. I was very surprised to find out how compact they are now days. The Electronics are so amazingly compact today. 2meters/440 will be minimum for me. If not that much more money a tribander will be in order.

My apologies for the oversight on my part. A minimum dual bander as they are not much more in price than a single bander.

Thanks,
Orangetom



posted on Jan, 30 2007 @ 09:07 PM
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There is one thing to bare in mind about hand Helds, well like everything else several things.
1: the clam shell battery holder. I have a yeasue 411e 2m with mars conversion that works on all the local emergency service freqs. I use a clamshell which is a battery box that uses batteries and replaces the rechargeable battery. These are made by the radio company and are model specific. I also only use lithium batteries they have several times the energy density, are much lighter, and work in cold, which disables alkaline batteries.
2: small hand helds that use a “rubber duckie “antenna are choked and do not broadcast at the full power that the radio is capable of. You can get other antenna: one like the segmented car antenna, another like fishing rod segment, and you can (if you know how, maybe someone who knows will give the details) make an antenna out of old TV antenna wire that can be thrown over things to raise it for better range.
3: armature electronic supply sells an amplifier that you can use in your car to boost your handheld from 5 to 25 watts or more.(aes.com)
4: lots of stuff I don’t know or remember



posted on Jan, 31 2007 @ 06:11 AM
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Originally posted by wcssar
There is one thing to bare in mind about hand Helds, well like everything else several things.
1: the clam shell battery holder. I have a yeasue 411e 2m with mars conversion that works on all the local emergency service freqs. I use a clamshell which is a battery box that uses batteries and replaces the rechargeable battery. These are made by the radio company and are model specific. I also only use lithium batteries they have several times the energy density, are much lighter, and work in cold, which disables alkaline batteries.
2: small hand helds that use a “rubber duckie “antenna are choked and do not broadcast at the full power that the radio is capable of. You can get other antenna: one like the segmented car antenna, another like fishing rod segment, and you can (if you know how, maybe someone who knows will give the details) make an antenna out of old TV antenna wire that can be thrown over things to raise it for better range.
3: armature electronic supply sells an amplifier that you can use in your car to boost your handheld from 5 to 25 watts or more.(aes.com)
4: lots of stuff I don’t know or remember


Yup...you can get better working rubber duckie antennas...than many of the factory models. I also have made several of those olde TV wire antennas and as long as you can get some altitude they work fine and better than the rubber duckie jobs. THese are my emergency standby antennas. I also have one of those small 30 watt amplifiers.

Seems to me that on certain models of antennas some hams construct a counterpoise reflector to hang down off the other side of the rubber duckie to act as sort of a dipole reflector and make the rubber duckies more effeceint.

Thanks,
Orangetom





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