How Many Dialects in English Are There?

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posted on Dec, 15 2003 @ 04:35 PM
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So, I live in America, near Chicago. I am told by New Englanders and Southerners that I have an accent. But I can hear the New Englander and Southern accent much more clearly than say, someone from Michigan.

Then I thought, what about England? I hear different accents from people from London. Ever see "Clockwork Orange"?

"I've got a bit of a pain in me gulliver". If I wasn't watching the film, I would have had no idea what they were talking about. Then I remeber something about Cockney(England), and this little rhymes they make up for various words. Here's the link:

www.cockneyrhymingslang.co.uk...

The Question:

Can you identify someone speaking English by their accent or dialect?




posted on Dec, 15 2003 @ 04:44 PM
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Southerner's accents stick out like a sore thumb.



posted on Dec, 15 2003 @ 04:53 PM
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It would really depend on what you consider a dialect. Southern american would be a sub dielect of the american dialect of english. See what I mean?



posted on Dec, 15 2003 @ 04:55 PM
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in clockwork orange they spoke another language... let me think of it... Nadsat!

Thats what they spoke.

I'll kick you in the zoobies.

edit: for zoobies!

[Edited on 15-12-2003 by Lysergic]



posted on Dec, 15 2003 @ 04:55 PM
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Yeef! There's a question that's hard to answer!!!

How about a nice link to the International Dialects in English Archive that incluldes dialects and regional examples?

www.ku.edu...

I'm right proud to see that Texan is well represented.



posted on Dec, 15 2003 @ 05:03 PM
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Wow Byrd!!!! Incredible link. (as usual)
That's quite an undertaking as it's still only listed to the state level and not down to counties and all. Very impressive already though.



posted on Dec, 15 2003 @ 06:34 PM
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It may seeem strange but i genuinely think everyone has their own little dialect, every one of my friends speak completely different from each other.



posted on Dec, 15 2003 @ 09:56 PM
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You can tell by someone's english if their from the city--they use intelligent words and pronounce clearly.

People in the countryside have a lazy dialect with their english kind of sluggish.



posted on Dec, 16 2003 @ 12:11 AM
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Practically every state or area has one.

And in NYC there's like 5.

Off the top of my head, I deal with Minnesotans frequently and they are downright nutty. Also Jersy.

The outbound telemarketing industry did a study a while ago though. The 'least objectionable dialect' to the most Americans was "Tarheel" - North Carolinian.

That's not to say Andy Griffith isn't a rube. Just hard to hang up on.



posted on Dec, 16 2003 @ 12:17 AM
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Originally posted by IMMORTAL
You can tell by someone's english if their from the city--they use intelligent words and pronounce clearly.

People in the countryside have a lazy dialect with their english kind of sluggish.


I don't buy that stereotype.

I've met plenty of dumb sluggish mofos from the "big fancy" city

Might I ask where did you pull your information out of?

[Edited on 16-12-2003 by Lysergic]



posted on Dec, 16 2003 @ 12:20 AM
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I agree lysergic.

Aren't most episodes of COPS set in a large city?



posted on Dec, 16 2003 @ 03:21 AM
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Originally posted by MrJingles
Southerner's accents stick out like a sore thumb.


Yes, but WHAT PART of the south is the question. It is not all the same below the Mason Dixon line.



posted on Dec, 16 2003 @ 05:10 AM
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Originally posted by IMMORTAL
You can tell by someone's english if their from the city--they use intelligent words and pronounce clearly.

People in the countryside have a lazy dialect with their english kind of sluggish.


I have a lazy dialect and my english is kind of sluggish, yet I have lived in the city my entire life.

I have heard so many dialects of english, some of them incomprehensible to another native speakers ear. You could actually consider Scots a dialect of english, watch the ATS scots kill me for that last remark, RUUUUUN!!!!


XAOS



posted on Dec, 16 2003 @ 05:59 AM
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There was a story on our "local", Regional (Midlands) TV news yesterday evening that the "Lincolnshire" dialect is dying out - they interviewed one person - a farmer - that could still "speak" it.

Hew was of the opinion that TV, and radio, etc, was "normalising" dialects, as children heard more of these than "local's".

Mid-Atlantic twang anyone?



posted on Dec, 16 2003 @ 09:16 AM
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There are tons of English accents and dialects, depending on which part of the country you come from, and your background.

Even with those geographical areas there are subtle differences between cities, especially in the North of England.



posted on Dec, 16 2003 @ 09:40 AM
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hehe, i got the mixa the hick dialect and the city slicker dialect up here in Wisconsin, i got it from my grandparents and my parents, and it grew on me. I aint got no, ebonics from Milwaukee though,



posted on Dec, 16 2003 @ 12:30 PM
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Originally posted by Lysergic

Originally posted by IMMORTAL
You can tell by someone's english if their from the city--they use intelligent words and pronounce clearly.

People in the countryside have a lazy dialect with their english kind of sluggish.


I don't buy that stereotype.

I've met plenty of dumb sluggish mofos from the "big fancy" city

Might I ask where did you pull your information out of?

[Edited on 16-12-2003 by Lysergic]
I got it from personal experience.



posted on Dec, 16 2003 @ 10:04 PM
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Originally posted by RANT
The outbound telemarketing industry did a study a while ago though. The 'least objectionable dialect' to the most Americans was "Tarheel" - North Carolinian.


...but which kind of "Tarheel?"
Piedmont, foothills, mountains? Charlotte proper vs. Rowan County?
Someone from Buncombe County sounds completely different from someone living in Cherryville (which, coincidentally, is pronouced "Churr-vull" 'round here).

I'd wager that city-proper Tarheel is more pleasing to the outside ear than rural area accents. Some of those Buncombers are damn near unintelligible.

*knows exactly where "over yonder" is*
-B.



posted on Dec, 16 2003 @ 10:13 PM
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#en cool topic cobbers eh.

But NC hot enough your side fr shorts n JANDALS?



posted on Dec, 29 2003 @ 03:59 AM
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I've lived in a lot of different places in the U.S. California, Colorado, Wyoming, Florida, and Alabama. It's amazing how many different accents there are. In northern Florida, people have a sourthern accent, but it's not like the one in Alabama right next door. In Wyoming where I lived they talked like you hear them in the old westerns(almost southern but with more drawl). In Cali and Colorado people pronounced there words more clearly without always taking shortcuts(aren't as opposed to are not). One of the best accents from the north is that lady from the first season of Survivor(tapioca anyone?)





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