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The right to vote automatically?

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posted on Jan, 28 2007 @ 03:53 PM
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Originally posted by SmallMindsBigIdeas

Originally posted by Freedom ERP
Just because someone has managed to see 18th birthdays, does this give them the automatic right to vote?

The ability to vote should be a right that is earned not just given because you have reached a certain age.

So how do we determine what a citizen has to do to earn the right to vote or is just turning 18 and good enough right?


I'm sorry but that would be the same way you "earned" your right to vote.

Maybe you could answer your own question so it's a little clearer what your stance on the issue is. Do you feel 18 is good enough? If not, what would you see as a "qualifying" right to vote?



Of course that how I am am able to vote. I survived 18 birthdays.

Is 18 old enough? Not in my opinion. I had little life experience or skills to comprehend the implications of what my vote meant. I was still in full time education. Trying to remember back that far!!!! Did I think about it? I recollect I voted the same way as my father

Of those who have posted on this thread, when you voted for the first time, did you vote for the same party/candidate as your parents?




posted on Jan, 28 2007 @ 05:12 PM
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Originally posted by Freedom ERP
Is 18 old enough? Not in my opinion.


Indeed, in your opinion. Would you have thought that at 18, though, or is that just after time to reflect? I think a lot of eighteen year olds are more than ready to vote. Go to a university and you'll see what I mean


I think the choice as to when you are 'ready' to be able to vote is a very personal and individual time. Some mature politically far earlier than others. You go into any college or possibly the top year of a high school and you'll find people who know what they're talking about politics-wise and will be able to make a reasonable and sensible decision come election time. Many can't, and I accept that fact - the point is that it's such a variable thing that it should be left up to the individual after 18. They're old enough to get a job, pay taxes, drive a car, smoke, drink, get married... virtually everything (besides standing for Parliament) so they clearly deserve the right to vote. Whether they think they're ready is another matter, a personal one for them alone to decide. Rights like voting are down to the individual as to whether they exercise them or not. If they don't, well, that's their loss. If they choose to exclude themselves from the process of government then so be it - just don't let me hear them complaining about political issues in the future


So I think the answer is to keep a set age for voting as the only qualification required (along with the other sensible ones currently in place... those imprisoned, in the House of Lords, deemed incapable of making a reasoned judgement etc. are currently excluded) and then leave it to the individual to decide whether they should or shouldn't vote. The worst possible thing we could do is let the state decide for us - issues like voting need as little state intervention as possible.



posted on Feb, 5 2007 @ 09:01 AM
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We, in this country live in a democracy, defined as:


Dictionary.com
government by the people; a form of government in which the supreme power is vested in the people and exercised directly by them or by their elected agents under a free electoral system.


Basically meaning, WE run the country "supreme power" lies with the population. Saying only certain people can vote is completely ludicrous, as has been pointed out it will create divisions, and is not good for the country.

How would it be worked out if you could vote? People with a certain IQ perhaps? Again that would be ridiculous as not all people are as intelligent as others ... some do not attend college/university etc as they simply cannot afford it, are you saying they should not vote simply of their circumstances?

By removing the right for everyone to vote in this country (at 18 years old which is reasonable), we are going back to the times beginning of the 20th century, where there was not universal suffrage, which is not democratic in the slightest.

[edit on 5-2-2007 by UKTruthSeeker]



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