It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

FBI can listen to you even when your phone is OFF!

page: 1
1
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 10:02 AM
link   
I don't particularly think the care what I have to say on my phone, but this is pretty disturbing. According to this, the FBI can use the tracking device in your phone (I guess it's the thing that tells 911 where you are, and apparently it's in every newer model phone) to activiate the microphone in your phone, even when it is turned off. Apparently, the only way around this is to reomve the battery.

The report claims they've only been using it on certain known members of the mafia, but who really knows for sure? Ostensibly they had a court order for this, but agin, who knows? I guess the next time you want to say something that might get you in trouble, make sure to pull the batteries out of every cell phone around you.

Video
CNet Article
Another article

Also, if someone can tell me how to use the YouTubeVideo format on here, I'd appreciate. I couldn't make it work...




posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 10:10 AM
link   
If that's true and the listen in on my home life .. they'll be board to death. Seriously, we are a dull bunch. The biggest discussions that happen in my house are what to have for dinner and trying to decide if we wish to go to a hockey game or not (the Flyers STINK this year).

I think that the FBi is a little too busy with real terrorists to waste time listening in on the average American. At least, I hope they are ....



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 10:24 AM
link   
It's true that cell phones can be remote activated, but the way a location can be tracked is through triangulation between cell towers, in relation to the phone's location, not that there's an active transponder that is secretly installed. Of course since the FBI and NSA have 300 million folks who are constantly monitoring every phone call in the USA 24/7, you should be careful what you say on or around your phone.



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 10:28 AM
link   
i can see why this would make many americans angry...

but, my position is:

don't break the law or commit unlawful acts and you will have nothing to worry about


this makes the most sense to me...





posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 10:34 AM
link   
I could see if everyone bought their phones from the government, the phone company was run by the government, and the government was listening in, then there'd be some valid complaints. It's just the technology inherent in how a cell phone works(or any phone for that matter), that allows it to be tapped by some means.



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 10:52 AM
link   
This fact has been known for a long time now, and was actually used to track the movements of certain terrorists. Now they (terrorists) have incorporated the removal of the battery into their training manuals.

As far as the statement that the NSA monitors every phone call every day in the US, that's just crazy.



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 10:54 AM
link   
This is a good page with info about this and other devices that can transmit unsecure/secure data...
www.privacyrights.org...

And there is no way that the authorities have 300 million people monitoring phones in the U.S. unless they extensively go outside the country to have people monitor these conversations...
U.S. population = about 300,000,000 people



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 11:00 AM
link   
it may be possible to run all communications through an electronic monitor of sorts, but to have a real ear of flesh listen to every call is not possible.
for example, there are millions of sound waves that reach my ear, but only a few are brought to my awareness.

supposing it is possible to monitor everyone all the time, is it they tech. that makes us uneasy or the fact that only a small group has access to it.
would we still be against such visablity if we all had access to it?



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 11:03 AM
link   

Originally posted by they see ALL
don't break the law or commit unlawful acts and you will have nothing to worry about


But what if you happen to have political views that the government considers anti-american or even terroristic (is that a word lol)?

That might not be a big probelm now, but the way things are going it soon will be.



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 11:16 AM
link   

Originally posted by ANOK

But what if you happen to have political views that the government considers anti-american or even terroristic (is that a word lol)?

That might not be a big probelm now, but the way things are going it soon will be.


Ok, so how many people have cell phones? and how many conversations are going on in the world at one time?

I'm sure that the government is not going hire 1 million people to hear you say on the phone that you don't like Bush.



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 11:19 AM
link   
I'm not so sure I agree that it is just a case of using technology that is inherent in the phones. This is in large part because I can't think of one logical, practical purpose for including the ability to remotely swtich on a microphone (outside of surveillance, of course). Clearly, the ability to track a phone via a chip could be useful for a variety of reasons (911, avalanche rescue, earthquake rescue, people lost in the woods, etc.). What I can't fathom is why the phone companies would, on their own, think, "gee, on top of installing this chip that allows us to track the phone, we should also make it so it can turn on the mic on the phone, even if it's turned off..." That is a difficult thought to believe.

Basically, there doesn't seem to be a reason for it other than surveillance. They are clearly not advertising this to customers, so we can assume this is not done for the customers. Doesn't it seem unusual that a company would spend money (R&D, production, etc.) to install a feature on phones that customers don't even know anything about? So who benefits? Not the consumer. Was this feature suggested to manufacturers?

This issue raises a host of questions that aren't even remotely answered by, "if you don't do nothin' wrong, you don't got nothin to worry about." That is a dangerous precedent to follow when questioning the necessity for privacy protection.



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 11:22 AM
link   

Originally posted by c3hamby
I'm sure that the government is not going hire 1 million people to hear you say on the phone that you don't like Bush.


I agree not everyone is going to be monitored, that's not the point.
The point is do you want them monitoring you if they decide, maybe from a forum post, that you are a threat?

But the real problem is where is this going to go? We are being watched, monitored more and more.

I'm glad you find it funny, and I bet you still think you're free, right?



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 11:24 AM
link   
the only way to claim our world is to stand by our truth, regardless of how many people see you, hear you, discourage you, hurt you, what if jesus didnt go into the city because of the camera's, what if martin luther king jr. didn't talk over the phone because the fbi was listening, what is chief seattle or sitting bull didnt post blogs because they may be monitored.

WE MUST SPEAK AND ACT OUR TRUTH, AND THE MORE THAT PEOPLE HEAR, THE MORE PEOPLE SEE, THE BETTER.

We've nothing to fear but fear itself



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 11:42 AM
link   

Originally posted by they see ALL
i can see why this would make many americans angry...

but, my position is:

don't break the law or commit unlawful acts and you will have nothing to worry about


this makes the most sense to me...




But thats like having someone wonder into ur house and root through ur possesions, only to say "well, I got nothing to hide, so whats the big deal?"



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 12:06 PM
link   

Originally posted by ANOK
But what if you happen to have political views that the government considers anti-american or even terroristic (is that a word lol)?

That might not be a big probelm now, but the way things are going it soon will be.


yupp:


Originally posted by they see ALL
i can see why this would make many americans angry...



Originally posted by john_bmth
But thats like having someone wonder into ur house and root through ur possesions, only to say "well, I got nothing to hide, so whats the big deal?"


well, i wouldn't allow just anyone to search something of mine


but, yes, i would allow a cop or the like to search something of mine (house / car) simply because i have nothing to hide


of course, that's just me though...

many many people are sensitive about their precious little freedoms that america is all about






posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 12:25 PM
link   
"If you've got nothing to hide you've got nothing to fear"

This kind of attitude is what will allow governments to strip your freedoms. The real question should be "As a person in a free society, don't i have the right to not be listened to covertly". IN america and here in the UK the government keeps saving that first phrase and use it to strip freedoms but the problem is that where will it end?

When a government can track everyone and listen to everything they then hav the power to remove anyone who disagrees with them. Historically we have seen how governments once they have this kind of power will exercise it.

"If you've got nothing to hide you've got nothing to fear"

What an absolute joke.



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 12:29 PM
link   
In a era based on technology I'm surprised so many here are argueing about how many people are listening. If this tool is being used I'd think all calls would be recorded and a computer would be constantly scanning for "hot" words.

bush, terrorism, drugs, etc etc....

Were so free, we pay tax after tax to be "protected" then they watch and listen at our expense. Thats just great!!!



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 12:30 PM
link   
i have doubts the FBI would be the agency to undertake this task. i do agree that somewhere this is happening, but not through the FBI. Any thoughts on what agency this may be .ed by?



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 12:46 PM
link   

Originally posted by Hamburglar
I'm not so sure I agree that it is just a case of using technology that is inherent in the phones. This is in large part because I can't think of one logical, practical purpose for including the ability to remotely swtich on a microphone (outside of surveillance, of course).

The original purpose was a maintenance/diagnostic function. And this is not uncommon in electronic devices. There are functions even in your TV that are enabled even when it is switched off, otherwise you would not be able to turn it on with your remote control.



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 12:49 PM
link   

Originally posted by ANOK


I agree not everyone is going to be monitored, that's not the point.
The point is do you want them monitoring you if they decide, maybe from a forum post, that you are a threat?

But the real problem is where is this going to go? We are being watched, monitored more and more.

I'm glad you find it funny, and I bet you still think you're free, right?


Well, so what if they are hearing what I talk about? If they decide to listen to me they are going to be very disappointed in what they hear. I would be more upset that they are using tax payer money to listen to conversations about nothing. They would have to hire 'a lot' of people to listen to these conversations. I consider myself free as long as I am not talking about people about my plans to blow up the White House (oops)




top topics



 
1
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join