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1st/2nd/3rd Gear Layers

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posted on Jan, 21 2007 @ 09:15 PM
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I read alot of posts stating what survival gear someone has, but not where they put it. While reading what some said, an alarming question came into my mind. What if you were in a combative type situation (civil unrest, invasion..whatever) and you happen to lose your rucksack that just so happened to contain most of your REQUIRED gear? This got me thinking, and after doing a bit of reading on the net I realized that the easiest (and safest) approach to this would be to implement a system of "gear layering."

The 3 basic layers (a.k.a. lines) of gear are:
First Layer Gear: Considered as the gear that you absolutely MUST have to survive. This is the gear that you keep immediately on your person (such as in your pockets, on your belt, ect).
Second Layer Gear: Essential equipment that would be kept in your LBV (load bearing vest), survival vest, butt pack, ... you get the idea. This gear is very important, but it's loss wouldn't immediately threaten your life.
Third Layer Gear: This is the gear contained in your ruck sack. It's where everything that won't be immediately required (or needed to be quickly accessed) can be placed.

Your gear list will depend on where you live, your physical limitations, and what you are preparing for. For example, what would the point be to prepare an extreme cold weather survival pack if you live in Arizona? Also, lets say that you are 65 years old and have heart trouble, you obviously don't want to be lugging around a 100lb sack (please note that I'm not saying someone 65 years old isn't capable of surviving..just that their survival plan would need to be different from someone who's 30 and in top physical shape).

1st Line Gear should include:
-Wrist Compass
-Small LED (RED) Flashlight
-Surefire (or other compact & bright light)
-Swiss Army Knife
-Leg Holster
-Side Arm
--2 spare magazines
-Small flask to contain water
-Large knife on leg holster (opposite side)
-Compact first aid kit
--Bandaids
--Tape
--Neosporin
--Gauze
-Compact survival kit
--Fishing hooks, line & sinkers
--Fire starter & waterproof matches (inside waterproof container!!)
--Water purf. tabs
--Parachute cord
--Signal mirror
--Whistle

Examples of 2nd layer gear: (on the LBV & buttpack)
-Assault Rifle
--4 spare magazines (in your LBV mag pouches)
-Flares
-Carabiners x 2
-Spare flashlight batteries (enough for 24 hours)
-Water bladder
-Binoculars
-Body warmer (air activated pad)
-Poncho w/liner
-Several pouches of freeze dried food (mountain house, or the like)
-Quickclot (powder that quickly clots blood)
-Large gauze compress
-Ducktape
-Snakebite kit
-Large canteen
-Maps (of the area you'd expect to be in)
-Map compass
-Firestarter (cotton smeared in vaseline inside of a pill bottle)
-Lighter

3rd line gear: (in the rucksack)
-50' parachute cord
-LARGE water repository
-Water purifier
-Sleeping bag (select type to fit the WORST possible environment you could encounter)
-Extra socks
-10 full freeze dried meals
-Rainsuit
-Batteries (24 pack - per device)
-Hand crank flashlight
-Extra ammo (usually 300 rounds per weapon)
-Extra pair of gloves

This covers the gear that I have. It may not be suitable to you, so you should customize it to fit your personal needs. More importantly, you should always remain proficient in the use of your gear.

I may have left some things out, so feel free to point out any problems with my packing list.

[edit on 1/21/2007 by JBurns]




posted on Jan, 21 2007 @ 10:55 PM
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In this thread here I mentioned the same concept. Here is what I posted there.
I feel that a bob should begin as a simple collection of things you already have. As time goes by you acquire more stuff, or get better stuff. I want to be prepared now, but at the same time I can't drop big money into my bob. I stand by my belief that one should be able to make due with what one can find. If you rely on fancy gadgets too much, you may be sad when you cannot get to them in time. I think we discussed the different levels of need that dictates how many types of bobs needed. I mean your everyday stuff that you carry on your person is one level, the things in you vehicle are another level. The supplies at home is a bigger and bulkier than the duffel bag in the basement for quick evacuations. All scenarios have a process for need.
1. my stuff in my wallet and leather will get me to my motorcycle or truck.
2. My vehicle's stash will get me home or away for extended stay.
3. My home has long term supplies that will last @ 2 months as well as a duffle bag with camping gear inside for long term stays outdoors.


Having levels of readiness imo is key.



posted on Jan, 21 2007 @ 11:03 PM
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That is a very efficient way of looking at it sw.


I see what you mean..basically the levels of complexity (so to speak) build off of one another.

As far as protection is concerned, do you keep anything on your person? bob? or just at home?



posted on Jan, 22 2007 @ 07:24 AM
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I keep a small multi-tool & a spring loaded blade on my person. Mostly for day to day crap, but in a pinch it opens pretty fast. In my car I keep a better multitool and a small buck knife in the rear compartment with my tools. In my BOB I more of the same.



posted on Jan, 22 2007 @ 01:00 PM
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I have begun to think along the same lines. Starting from scratch a few months ago im currently building up from the essential items, to some more items to make life easier.

My kit seems alot more compact than alot of others i see posted but i geuss its all a matter of personal preferance.

One thing does spring to mind while readin your post though. If you get your pack stolen (i presume thats what you mean when you say lose it) how do you manage to keep your 2nd stage of hit, because its just as visible and easy to steal as a rucksack. It may be easier to keep a hold of items in your pockets etc.



posted on Jan, 23 2007 @ 04:24 AM
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I'm an active Airsoft-player (I know, kiddy stuff, but we are trying to establish this as a real sport here in Switzerland, so...) and have had some intense experiences with gear. We have had several multi day games (without possibility to restock stuff, except what we found in nature; we had to carry everything we needed for those days) and one of the most important things I noticed was this: see to it that you can wear your gear for a long time comfortably.

There are few things worse than stuff that produces chaffs and pressure points. This is bad for morale, can lead to infections in the worst case and puts unneccesary strain on your group when they have to listen to your complaining.

So hear my words: your fancyest gear will do you no good if you can't wear it on a 20 mile walk because its getting uncomfortable.

For those interested, I'll post a list of my gear when I'm home.



posted on Jan, 23 2007 @ 05:17 AM
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I've wondered if lightweight moto-cross armour would be any use to be worn as a second layer under jacket? You have added protection against broken-bone injuries from fall/attack as the last place you'll want to be going if the sit.x hits the fan is into the city to find a hospital to get fixed up.



posted on Jan, 23 2007 @ 07:49 AM
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I guess a full moto-cross armour would be rather cumbersome for long ranges on foot. Kneepads, elbowpads and good boots are more practical here.
For a homedefense-scenario, I would consider it insufficient; I'd prefer a bulletproof armor with plates. Something like this.



posted on Jan, 24 2007 @ 09:41 PM
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THIS COULD BE EXTENDED TO THE 4TH LAYER: ITEMS YOU KEEP IN YOU CAR THAT YOU NEVER INTEND TO CARRY ON YOUR PERSOM . IN MOST STRANDING SITUATIONS YOUR BEST BET IS TO AWAIT RESCUE IF YOU CAN( HELP SAR BY LETTING PEOPLE KNOW YOUR ROUTE AND EXPECTED ARRIVAL TIME ) YOUR CAR CAN CARRY ALOT OF SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT WITHOUT ADDING ALOT OF WEIGHT OR TAKING UP A LOT OF SPACE. THESE ITEMS VARY WILDY AS YOUR AREA AND INCOME WILL DICTATE WHAT YOU WILL/SHOULD HAVE.
LAYER 5 : CACHE(SUPPLIES HIDDEN SOMEWHERE ELSE) THIS IS A WAY TO KEEP STUFF FROM BEENIG STOLEN . IF YOU GET SEPERATED FROM YOUR STUFF BY WHATEVER MEANS A HIDDEN SUPPLY OF BASIC ITEMS OR NOT SO BASIC COULD MAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.






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