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Venison Jerky

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posted on Jan, 19 2007 @ 09:43 PM
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I took a buck back in november. Back then the weather was warm, I we just quartered it out, then cut those pieces up until they'd fit in freezer bags.

I am supposed to have a few days of liesure, so I thought I'd make some of this into jerky.

I eat a lot of jerky when I travel. See, if you drink cokes or coffee to stay awake, then you eventually have to pull off to the side of the road to take a whiz, and that slows down your travel time. But if you get some really hot jerky, the pepper will keep you awake late at night. Only problem is, the stuff I like costs about six bucks for a six ounce bag. So, I'll just make my own.

All those freezer bags full of deer meat that we plopped into the freezer in the garage . . . I could have sworn I labeled each one. Let's see. Hmm. that looks like a shoulder, right? All the recipies for jerky online say use totally lean meat. Fine. this looks great.

Get out the dutch oven, stick it in the sink, and run warm water over the freezer bag. 2 hours later, it's still stiff. 3 hours, and some of it is soft. Fine, I'll just cut off the thawed parts, and start dressing them out.

All the websites say to remove the fascia, the under-skin membrane, and all sinews, tendons and fat. Turns out this hunk of bambi is layer after layer of 1/4 inch thick muscle, plus a layer of slimy membrane, and then another 1/4 inc of muscle. I'm wasting more than is going into the marinade bowls. this could suck.

I get out an electric carving knife and start paring away. I try to follow the sheets of fat through the meat, but they twist and turn around the shoulder, and I can already tell I'm wasting tons of this. Wish I'd thought to make stew while I was dressing this out . . .

Finally, I hit frozen meat. Hey! It works ten times better when it is almost completely stiff--you can turn it and carve out the membrane, and make really thin slices. Note to ATS: It's much easier to slice thin slices while the meat is frozen. Wish someone had told me that.

So now I have about 8 pounds of what look like giant dark-red pringles. They stack right back up, just like they came off the arm . . .

I divided the meat into two batches.

Lot A:

1 cup BBQ sauce
1 tsp chili powder
1 tb worcestershire sauce
1 tsp ground dried green chiles
1 tsp sun-dried ground red pepper

Lot B:

1 cup BBQ sauce
1 tsp lemon pepper
1 tsp chili powder
1 tb worcestershire sauce
1 tsp ground dried green chiles
1 tsp sund-dried ground red pepper.
10 tablespoons Shiner Bock beer.

Tomorrow I plan to fire up the smoker; first with charcoal. Then, once the fire is going I'll put on a log of mesquite. Over a pan of water next to the fire, I'll put the meat on racks. Probaly 4 or 5 hours will get 'r done.


Stuff I learned that has survival applications:

- The only jerky I'm interested in is stuff that will keep for 6 months or more at room temperature. So this whole project is done with an eye toward what I'll be doing if the lights go out: making major amounts of jerky!

- The ingredients I'm using don't require refridgeration. Other than the BBQ and beer, I can got this stuff locally, or at least in this region. In a survival situation, I could concievably run out of BBQ sauce; but I have enough shiner to last until civilization re-emerges, in all probability.

- Aim to make jerky when the meat is frozen: in the depths of winter would seem like the ideal time. Might make plans for survival where one is assured of a strong enough winter to freeze meat until it can be jerked.

- I avoided using "liquid smoke," msg, or anything I cannot find locally.

-I have an electric dehydrator, but I want to try doing this with nothing more than charcoal and firewood---stuff I could use with no electricity, and no supplies at the grocery.

I'll let you know how it turns out.

.




posted on Jan, 19 2007 @ 10:04 PM
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awesome, too bad i dont hunt and there arent any deer in my area.. but upstate there is! That must be nice to have 8 pounds of it.. let me know how it turns out.. it never hurts to learn something new!! good luck



posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 12:15 AM
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As a matter of fact, deer have been spotted within 50 miles of manhattan island, since the millennium, if I remember correctly.

One of my rules for survival exercises like this is that it must have a non-survivalist payoff to justify the effort (just in case the skill is never needed in a survival situation). In this case, the effort is to save money and have a foodstock that doesn't need refrigeration, that I can take along when I'm on the road for a week or so.

I figure my expense on the season's venison so far works out like, ~$50 for the hunting license I think, and ~ $50 in gas to and from the hunting site. I used the ammo I bought about 3 years ago. At ~145 lbs. of meat, that works out to about 69 cents a pound. Plus its all the meat we'll need for the year.

Grinding my own burger has been the first step. While I still pay to have some of it made into sausage, the next step is making jerky. I have about all the steaks and roasts of venison my family will eat as it is.

I have wondered for a while now, about what I'd do without electricity for weeks at a time, or maybe permanently. Like in the wake of Katrina or Hugo or something. We have a freezer that is so full right now that you can hardly close the door. What if the power goes out? I've got a day or three to convert all that meat for long-term, warm storage. I just feel like I'd better know what I'm doing.

.



posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 02:27 AM
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Hunting is huge where I live ,especially whitetail deer.I also freeze my venison part way to cut it up.Its much easier to handle.Anyhow thanks for the recipe Doc,I love venison jerky.



posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 02:37 PM
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Basically, my part of Texas is smack dap in the middle of an ice storm, on PRECISELY the day I want to "dry" my jerky.


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Basically before bed last night I put the meat into ziplock bags with the marinade. I took out "version A" this morning, and it has basically soaked up all the brine. But the strips are still wet.

At first, I tried to dap them with a paper towel. I decided instead to coat them. So I've mixed 50/50 Lowry's cayenne pepper seasoning (made with tabasco!) and granulated sugar:


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(I'm going to post this reply to see if the pics are huge or somethig. More in a minute.)

[edit on 20-1-2007 by dr_strangecraft]

[edit on 20-1-2007 by dr_strangecraft]



posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 02:47 PM
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If you can grind your meat for chop meat you can make your own sausage - Legg's has a super breakfast sausage mix you can get -- but use good beef fat rather than pork - pork tends to go off quicker in my opinion. I am pretty sure they also have summer sausage mix and kielbasa mix and pepperoni mix also if you want to try those.

We flatten the sausage meat out on a piece of parchment paper and cut it into patties with a glass and freeze them on a cookie sheet then freeze in foodsaver bags -

Good luck and enjoy



posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 02:57 PM
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Intresting experiment.

Is that a seal a meal type gadget in the background of one of your pictures.

My instinct before hand for long term storage would be to seal the finished jerky in a vacuum.
However I also understand the premise of your exertions ..can you do this without electricity. Excellent point.

One of the guys at work makes jerky. I am going to inquire of him this week as to how he would propose to do so without electricity.

Oh..by the way...as per one of your earlier posts...did you drop that deer with your reliable .243 rifle?? Curious about this?

And Yes...that is some rough looking weather out there in Texas. I am watching the news and radar posts closely come this week. It looks as if it will eventually work its way here twords the East coast.

Thanks for your posts,
I will be checking this one out again,
Orangetom



posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 02:58 PM
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Dipping the strips of venison into the mix:

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Here's the grill I'm using today:


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Below, you can see that I've built a small fire of charcoal on the left, and laid a single stick of mesquite thereon.

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The right half gets the jerky:

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My grill is equipped with a vent on the lower left:

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which I keep fiddling with. Here it's shut:


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and let it smoke:


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posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 03:13 PM
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Have you tried smoking venison or other red meats? The process is similar to jerking but leaves the meat more tender. It'll last a long time without refrigeration.

here's a great link for it:

www.ag.ndsu.edu...



posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 03:15 PM
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I love venison jerky. I used to use a dehydrator, but if you google Alton Brown and the show 'good eats" he makes jerkey in one episode. He uses a fan and two furnace filters to air dry the meat and the whole process works killer!!!!!!

Elk jerkey is also a nice treat (if you have some Elk handy that is)

[edit on 1/20/07 by FredT]



posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 03:18 PM
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A simple marinade is normal everyday itilian dressing of your favorite kind
Some like it some dont. I personally dont but alot of guys at work pay me to do it for them



posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 05:11 PM
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Originally posted by crgintx
Have you tried smoking venison or other red meats? The process is similar to jerking but leaves the meat more tender. It'll last a long time without refrigeration.



Yes, as a matter of fact, if you look at my set-up shown above, it is actually a smoker. I have smoked a lot of brisket in my time; it keeps longer than regular cooked meat, but no where jerky is purported to.

I know a lot of tricks for keeping a smoked brisket from drying out. I make a great beer-sop, and I use a pan of water underneath the brisket, which evaporates and keeps it moist. It has actually been hard today, to watch meat drying out; I have a huge urge to spray the fire down and baste the meat!


Here's my goal, and why I put this in the survival threads, instead of cooking:

-I want spicy meat to keep me awake.

-I want meat that will keep, hopefullly long-term, without refrigeration.

-Jerked meat is much lighter weight.

-MOST IMPORTANT: I'm looking for a process that I can use without any electricity whatsoever. Other than the initially frozen meat, I don't want to use anything that requires electricity or other supplies I won't have if the power fails, and stays off for a week (like it has in parts of Oklahoma!)

-I'm looking for ingredients that have a long shelf-life. Stuff I can find in our spice-rack, by the light of my flashlight.

-I want a recipe that doesn't contain a lot of artificial stuff, particularly potassium nitrate. That stuff can slow you down.



posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 05:18 PM
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Originally posted by FredT
I love venison jerky. I used to use a dehydrator, but if you google Alton Brown and the show 'good eats" he makes jerkey in one episode. He uses a fan and two furnace filters to air dry the meat and the whole process works killer!!!!!!



Yes, I've had that stuff and it's great.

Trouble is, you need to have electricity to make it. Also, you'll notice he uses a lot of processed seasonings: "liquid smoke," m.s.g., etc.

I want my smoke to be real.


I like my meat a hell of a lot spicier, and smokier, than most recipes envision. And I prefer mesquite over eastern woods like hickory or maple.

.



posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 05:25 PM
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I don't think he used MSG. He actually showed you how to make your own liquid smoke in the same episode If I recall.

I agree it does require electricity, but its damm good.

The other possibility I have never considered: What about making your own air cured ham or venision prosciutto? That might be another way, say using a whole loin or something?



posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 05:48 PM
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Originally posted by FredT

The other possibility I have never considered: What about making your own air cured ham or venision prosciutto? That might be another way, say using a whole loin or something?



I think that's a great idea.

I was watching the good eats when he was making sauerbraten. It was on a couple of days ago.

It got me to thinking: that before refrigeration, there were only four ways to preserve meat:

1. Salt
2. Sugar (honey)
3. Vinegar
4. smoke

I'd love to explore each of those avenues, in time.



posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 06:22 PM
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I also love venison anything! Plus I give vote number 2 to Alton Brown for not only his jerky technique but his many other simple set ups for smoking, etc...
The guy really knows his stuff for process of raw meats, fish and fowl. He takes you from cutting and trimming all the way to the very best storage methods.

Unfortunately I now live in a metropolitan area and when I went home this year for Christmas my buddy had already gone thru his deer meat and I didn't have time to hit up anyone else. My mouth was watering too.

Oh well! Hope your jerky comes out good!

P.S. I never make venison sausage. Just not a good animal for sausage IMO.



posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 06:25 PM
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It makes sence to make your own jerkey anyway. its better than the purchased stuff. you have much more controll over whats goin in esp. if you hunt, and if you price out jerkey by the pound its 20-30 $$$$ per



posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 06:52 PM
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Did you make that grill or have it made?? It looks to heavy duty for a store bought grill?? Simplicity personified but heavy duty.

Still looks cold down there. Looks like once again it will work itself in this direction...the cold weather.

Good pictures you posted there. I shall have to learn one day how to do that.

Thanks,
Orangetom



posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 07:09 PM
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A local grocery store(HEB) sell some grills like that, that are very sturdy for $60-90. Cast iron grill, heavy gage steel. Well made BBQ Grills in Texas are fairly inexpensive. It's all the old oil field welders who are trying to keep a steady income between the boom and bust periods. They're the one's making them. With the recent drop in oil prices, they're already shutting down rigs here in Texas. Looks like the Shrub has got to attack Iran to get Gas back up to $3+ a gallon to keep this rigs up and running.



posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 09:06 PM
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Originally posted by orangetom1999
Did you make that grill or have it made?? It looks to heavy duty for a store bought grill?? Simplicity personified but heavy duty.


I got in trade from a buddy. Yes, it's made out of pipe of various gauges. The builder was trying to make a market for it, by adding the cute little vent control, the catcher for the lid's handle, the expansion grate for a shelf in front of the firebox, etc. On the other hand, if you look at the "roof" on the smokestack, it's just a piece of angle-iron, ground smooth so there's no corners.

I have some other grills as well. A much larger smoker, for my briskets, and a gas grill for quick steaks, burgers or hotdogs. I also use the gas grill for frying bacon, because the mess stays out in the yard.



(as an aside to the previous poster)
Are you SURE anyone is shutting down wells in TX??? You know that pump jacks pause every few hours for the hole to fill back with oil, right? Most running wells have a cost of 30-40 bucks a barrel. I don't care who yar, 55 bucks a barrel is pretty good money. Heck, it was at 42. If someone shuts down a well these days, it's due to lack of parts, not due to lack of profit. Think about it. If $40 oil was profitable 5 years ago, why isn't 65$ a good deal now???

[edit on 20-1-2007 by dr_strangecraft]




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