It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

ESA and Russia Discussing Jointly Building Space Shuttle

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 06:21 PM
link   


Russian space agency Roskosmos and the European Space Agency (ESA) are in talks to jointly build a space shuttle that could be launched from a base in French Guiana, representatives of Russian space constructor RKK Energiya and ESA said.

The shuttle would be based on an updated version of the Russian Soyuz shuttle, and could be ready for its first flight by 2010 and launched by the Russian Soyuz-2 rocket, RKK Energiya head Nikolai Sevastyanov was quoted by news agency ITAR-TASS as saying.

"[The] ESA made the decision about these initiatives and has already spent 20 million euros (26 million dollars) this year on preliminary development for the project," Sevastyanov said.

Daniel Sacotte, director of human space flight at ESA, confirmed to AFP that ESA was discussing the project with the Russians, as well as possible Japanese participants.
Sacotte said the goal was to develop a shuttle capable of crew transfers to the International Space Station (ISS), as well as later participating in a US-planned lunar exploration program.


SOURCE:

Physorg.com


I figured it woas only a matter of time before the ESA developed
it's own launch vehicle, and doing it jointly with Russia will be a
big help.

This is a good sign, as the future of space exploration is not that
of single nations, but in international cooperation and joint projects.


Comments, Opinions?




posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 06:27 PM
link   
I am glad they are finally getting around to it. The US Space shuttle it a 50's design that is in sore need of an update, and this positive/ friendly competition will only spur development of our next generation launch vehicle. It is highly likely that the US will have some input into the Soviet/Euro design as most space technology is a shared effort. In addition to this, there is a growing private sector space industry.

We should have been in this situation decades ago, but it is good to finally see this happening.



posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 07:57 PM
link   
While it is mentioned in the source article, it is worth noting a second time that this vehicle will be an evolved version of the Soyuz TMA craft currently used by the Russians. Some sources are calling the new craft the Advanced Crew Transportation System (ACTS) or, alternatively, Soyuz K, but either way it is an uprated Soyuz capsule with a European-built orbital module.

Russia has always used the term "space shuttle" in a different way than America does - in the States we're used to hearing about THE Space Shuttle, while the Russians use the term to describe any craft that shuttles crews and supplies to and from a space station (the ISS, Mir, the Salyut stations). The achievement here - should this project bear fruit - is more political than it is technical.

Don't get me wrong - I think that this is a great thing for both the Europeans and the Russians. But this is not a "space shuttle" in the way that most Americans are used to thinking about the term.



posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 08:11 PM
link   
Shuttle means reusable for back and forth trips. It does not have to look like a plane and the US next generation launch vehicle will work more like the Russian model than the current shuttle. There are benefits to a shuttle that can glide in for landing, but it is not the only way to go.

Here is a look at what direction the US might be headed for the Next Generation Space Shuttle replacement: Next Gen Shuttle Plans

Private sector Launch Vehicles:
Space Ship One

Blue Origin Based on the US Delta Clipper plans from the 90's. Many former scientists from the Delta Clipper project are now working on Blue Origin. They are Hiring if anyone is interested.


jra

posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 09:01 PM
link   

Originally posted by Terapin
Here is a look at what direction the US might be headed for the Next Generation Space Shuttle replacement: Next Gen Shuttle Plans


That article is from 2002. I don't know if those options are still being considered anymore, at least not for the near future anyway. NASA will probably be using the Orion capsules for the next while.

I hope the RSA and ESA can pull it off though. At least Russia has experience at building a shuttle. The Buran was a good spacecraft. Almost identical to the US shuttle, but a bit better in my opinion. Plus the Energia booster was incredibly powerful. Too bad those programs collapsed along with the USSR. Anyway, I look forward to seeing what they come up with.



posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 09:08 PM
link   
Here is some information on the Orion Capsule mentioned: Orion

Much like the Old Apollo capsule but larger. Not at all like the current shutttle.



posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 10:30 PM
link   
Terapin, I don't know if you were addressing my post with these comments:


Originally posted by Terapin
Shuttle means reusable for back and forth trips. It does not have to look like a plane and the US next generation launch vehicle will work more like the Russian model than the current shuttle. There are benefits to a shuttle that can glide in for landing, but it is not the only way to go.


"Shuttle" means different things to different people, a fact which I was trying to get across in my post. To most Americans, who are most familiar with the US Space Shuttle, it does mean a spacecraft which is reusable for back-and-forth trips to space.

The Russians have a different understanding, which is that any craft that "shuttles" between the Earth and a Space Station can be called a shuttle. That's why they call the Soyuz capsule a "space shuttle" in iori_komei's original posted article, even though Soyuz craft are not re-used. They probably could be, as NASA plans to do with the Orion capsules, but they never have been.

The "space shuttle" that RSA and ESA are going to jointly develop will be based on the existing Soyuz craft; the most notable differences will be a (probably) European-built Orbital Module. the ability to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere on a return trajectory from the moon. Per the article posted by iori_komei:


The shuttle would be based on an updated version of the Russian Soyuz shuttle, and could be ready for its first flight by 2010 and launched by the Russian Soyuz-2 rocket, RKK Energiya head Nikolai Sevastyanov was quoted by news agency ITAR-TASS as saying.

Note: Bolded emphasis mine.

SOURCE: www.physorg.com...


BTW: There's no indication that this ACTS/Soyuz K shuttle (there's that word again....) will be reusable.



posted on Jan, 19 2007 @ 12:06 PM
link   
What ever happened with the Russian Kliper project?

Last I heard ESA was interested in participating in the Kliper program, not the updated Soyuz.



posted on Jan, 19 2007 @ 03:53 PM
link   
That depends on which version of Kliper you're talking about. Kliper went through a number of re-designs, most focused on getting the vehicle's weight down. It was originally intended to be launched on a Zenit or Angara rocket, both of which have more payload potential than the Soyuz launch vehicle (which is currently used to launch Soyuz spacecraft).

As development progressed, using the Zenit became politically problematic - Zenits are made in Ukraine - and the Angara is behind schedule. So RKK Energia decided to use a variant of the Soyuz LV to launch Kliper, which meant loosing weight, which meant a less capable vehicle. The last anyone knew, the Kliper design had lost so much weight and capability that it could not even make ISS orbit by itself, and would have had to rely on an as-yet-undeveloped space tug called Parom to dock with the space station.

The ESA was hesitant to provide development capital for two new spacecraft (Kliper and Parom), so the RSA - which really wants some European financial help on this one - has gone with an uprated Soyuz instead. The Europeans are getting a Soyuz pad in Kourou sometime in 2008 (if memory serves), so they will be able to launch ACTS/Soyuz K craft from there.

As for Kliper, RKK Energia still has faith in the design, and claims to be continuing development on its own. How far they'll get without funding from the Russians or the Europeans remains to be seen.







 
0

log in

join