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9 Yr Old Boards 2 Flights, Steals Car, In Effort To Get Back To Dallas

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posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 08:11 AM
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A 9 year old Tacoma, WA. boy, who didn't like his suburban home and was afraid of a sex offender in his neighborhood, made his way aboard two flights, stole a car and led San Antonio police on a high-speed chase at speeds over 90MPH. The kid was trying to make his way back to Dallas to be with his grandfather.


LAKEWOOD, Wash. — A 9-year-old boy who didn't like his suburban Tacoma home stole a car, got caught, then ran away again and flew to San Antonio with a plane change in Phoenix before he was arrested, authorities said.

Investigators and Southwest Airlines officials were trying to determine how Semaj Booker, who was trying to get to his grandfather in Texas, got through airport security and boarded the flights.

"The only thing I have to offer on that is that were looking into it," Southwest spokeswoman Beth Harbin said.

Transportation Security Administration spokeswoman Jennifer Peppin said travelers must have a boarding pass to go through airport security checkpoints, although adults can use an escort pass to bring young children or seniors to a flight gate.

"That young man would've had to have a boarding pass," Peppin said.

The 80-pound, 4-foot-9 fourth grader, held in juvenile detention Tuesday night in San Antonio, was "incredibly motivated to get to Texas," Lakewood police Lt. David B. Guttu said. "He doesn't want to live in Washington state."

www.foxnews.com...

This wasn't the first time the kid had stlen a car. Nine years old, savvy enough to make it across country, smart enough to drive.

I want this kid on my team!




posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 10:53 AM
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Clearly, this 9years old fellow is a really Bright one

Wise enough to drive and almost tricked Airport Security

I mean, he can take care of himself at 9years old! I say im not too scared about his future



posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 01:01 PM
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Originally posted by CanadianGlasnost
Clearly, this 9years old fellow is a really Bright one




Yeah, very bright.



Stealing cars, running from the police and pretending he is someone else so he can get onto a plane. That is really bright. Lets praise the kid for how smart he is.




Originally posted by CanadianGlasnost
Wise enough to drive and almost tricked Airport Security


Wise?!? Whats the matter with you?




Originally posted by CanadianGlasnost

I mean, he can take care of himself at 9years old! I say im not too scared about his future




Taking care of himself!?! What?

Taking care of yourself isn't speeding down the highway putting innocent people at risk. What would of happened if he killed another driver? A cop? Himself??

Not too scared of his future? If he doesn't straighten out he will keep doing the same crap. He will steal someones car and they will shoot him down. Or get into a shootout with cops. He will end up dead or in prision if someone doesn't set him straight.

I don't know why the hell you think he is so bright and wise. But I sure as hell don't.


[edit on 18/1/2007 by enjoies05]



posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 01:48 PM
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I don't think there's any question that the kid is bright. Most kids his age couldn't even find their way to the airport, much less make it to Texas.

Wise? Not at his age - not yet. I think it's a blessing in disguise that he was caught. Maybe some benefactor or group will realize that this kid is smart enough to benefit from a good education and solid direction.



posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 01:54 PM
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How about resourceful?

I won't praise and laud his accomplishments, but I will still be impressed. This was no easy feat, and for a nine year old to con and manipulate his way through an airport is impressive.

I also can concur with his assessment of the state of Washington...



posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 02:10 PM
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I agree, at first glance this kid seems very resourceful and really strong headed to get home. But after reading the entire article I worry about the future this young man faces. He obviously is rather adept at getting around and navigating a grown up world .. but he's also already a serious delinquent.

The article says he is a known car thief and frequent runaway in the area that he lives in. It lists 3 incidents in which he was implicated in driving stolen vehicles in the Seattle area. He wanted to "go home" to Dallas but was tired of waiting for his mom to move him back there. I doubt his sincerity of being scared of a sexual offender in the neighborhood and that sounds like it's coming from mom and not the kid.

From the sounds of it he's more than a little out of control ... espcially at his young age ... and may benefit from being out of mom's environment.



posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 02:26 PM
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Originally posted by jsobecky
I don't think there's any question that the kid is bright.


Bright kids wouldn't think of doing that stuff in the first place.



posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 03:21 PM
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Originally posted by enjoies05

Originally posted by jsobecky
I don't think there's any question that the kid is bright.


Bright kids wouldn't think of doing that stuff in the first place.

Some of the brightest minds around are guests of the state.



posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 04:03 PM
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This kid is very resourceful and creative. If these skills are focused upon in the proper manner, he could be very successful when he's an adult. His mother is obviously not able to raise him properly even if she does care about him.

He reminds me of my daughter. She stole her first car when she was 18 months old. She could program a VCR around the same age. When she was 8 years old she broke into a hospital pharmacy and rearranged the shelves while I was in the OR having surgery. She had escaped the woman who was supposed to be watching her. The hospital had to change the code to their pharmacy and redo the shelves and file a report. I found out about it a few days after it happened. Peeps were waiting for me to recover a little before filling me in on the matter.

The problem with children like these is that they are so much smarter than the adults around them. They often are diagnosed ADD or ADHD and put on meds to slow them down to the level of those around them, especially when they're low income. The kids become bored very easily because things around them are way beneath their intelligence levels and then they end up getting into trouble. My daughter has been very bored in school in the past and they want to drug her down. I have refused to let that happen. She has been in therapy to try and learn to make better decisions. She has made some improvement. It is a constant struggle. She figures out things pretty fast though. She outscores the other students at most everything and the stuff she doesn't she is usually so bored by the assigned work that she doesn't bother doing it. She'll be 11 this year and can read and write better than a lot of college students I have encountered. I cannot picture her getting on an airplane though.

This boy would benefit from being put into accelerated education. The mother probably doesn't have the financial means to persue such things though. Income status has nothing to do with someone's intelligence level. The mother does not seem to be as bright as her son from interviews, but does seem to care about him. Hopefully, some rich person will sponser the guy and get him into a good school.

This incident does say a lot about airport security. I am so glad I do not fly.



posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 04:10 PM
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Originally posted by Jessicamsa
She stole her first car when she was 18 months old.

I'm sorry, but why do I have the feeling you're lying?
Stole a car a 1 1/2 years-old? How did she reach the gas pedal?
Give me a break.



posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 04:19 PM
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Originally posted by rocknroll

Originally posted by Jessicamsa
She stole her first car when she was 18 months old.

I'm sorry, but why do I have the feeling you're lying?
Stole a car a 1 1/2 years-old? How did she reach the gas pedal?
Give me a break.


I was picking her up from the babysitter. The keys were in the ignition. She could not reach the pedals. I was talking to the babysitter about something on the porch and heard the engine turn on. The car then started drifting down the driveway. I had to run and catch up to the car, open the passenger door, and jump in and put the car into park in order to stop it because I couldn't get to the brake from the passenger side. She was bound and determined that she was going to leave right then and was going to leave without me.



posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 04:52 PM
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Originally posted by Jessicamsa
I was picking her up from the babysitter. The keys were in the ignition. She could not reach the pedals. I was talking to the babysitter about something on the porch and heard the engine turn on. The car then started drifting down the driveway. I had to run and catch up to the car, open the passenger door, and jump in and put the car into park in order to stop it because I couldn't get to the brake from the passenger side. She was bound and determined that she was going to leave right then and was going to leave without me.


Big difference between that explanation and this line:
"She stole her first car when she was 18 months old."
No offense.



posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 06:00 PM
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Originally posted by rocknroll

Originally posted by Jessicamsa
I was picking her up from the babysitter. The keys were in the ignition. She could not reach the pedals. I was talking to the babysitter about something on the porch and heard the engine turn on. The car then started drifting down the driveway. I had to run and catch up to the car, open the passenger door, and jump in and put the car into park in order to stop it because I couldn't get to the brake from the passenger side. She was bound and determined that she was going to leave right then and was going to leave without me.


Big difference between that explanation and this line:
"She stole her first car when she was 18 months old."
No offense.



No offense taken.

The family still teases her about it and she's like "I was only a baby."



posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 06:26 PM
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This is proof that you should not quit, or give in to what others want or believe if you believe is something strong enough. They should make a movie about this kid. He's going to probably need the $$$$ when the bills for the cars hits his mom. I really wish i could say that i was close to being as smart and amaginative as he is when i was nine. Wow! Seattle must really suck by the way. Maybe he just really hates the rain. Also being from the great state of TEXAS, i can understand. LOL

[edit on 18-1-2007 by Royal76]



posted on Jan, 19 2007 @ 10:00 AM
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Holy **** people. How is a kid that steals cars "smart'? Explain that one.

Smart people don't steal cars. Criminals steals cars.


"They should make a movie about this kid."

Just turn on COPS in a few years and you'll see him.



posted on Jan, 19 2007 @ 10:17 AM
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enjoies, I think you're taking people's reaction a bit too strongly. No one is saying what this kid did is right per se, nor that he fully understood the consequences of his actions.

However, I know perfectly well that if I were put to do the same thing at my age and with many episodes of MacGuyver and Prisonbreak behind me, I'd still be lucky to make it to the airport, let alone through security. I know I wouldn't have the slightest idea how to steal a car unless the keys were in the ignition and the door was open; even then, I'd still probably screw it up by taking too long to figure out which gear was which or trying to adjust the seat.

The kid needs a lot of good guidance, but I'd be damned before I just write him off as a common criminal Hopefully they can get him some kind of counselor or mentor of some kind who'd be able to teach this kid how to use his "powers" for good.



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