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Some more info on our right being striken away

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posted on Jan, 12 2007 @ 09:46 PM
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I came across this webpage that has some nice things to say about a few senators and a current standing president? Check it out see what you think it may be on here already...Sorry if so I haven't seen it. www.apfn.org...




posted on Jan, 12 2007 @ 09:57 PM
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Unless you have new informtaion to post here, there are several thrads from last fall on H.R. 6166
Merely posting a link with little of no commentary does not provide me good debate.

Previous threads
www.abovetopsecret.com...
www.abovepolitics.com...
www.abovetopsecret.com...
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jan, 12 2007 @ 11:33 PM
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Originally posted by DontTreadOnMe
Unless you have new informtaion to post here, there are several thrads from last fall on H.R. 6166
Merely posting a link with little of no commentary does not provide me good debate.

Previous threads
www.abovetopsecret.com...
www.abovepolitics.com...
www.abovetopsecret.com...
www.abovetopsecret.com...


I was kind hoping some would chime in on the photo copies on the page



posted on Jan, 13 2007 @ 12:13 PM
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Originally posted by tsloan
I came across this webpage that has some nice things to say about a few senators and a current standing president? Check it out see what you think it may be on here already...


1st tsloan, let me say I'm glad to see you are paying attention to the Bills that Congress seems to have no problem pushing through when they are meant to strip away our rights, liberties, and freedoms.

However, not to steer you away from your current crusade, but you need to understand something about the bills and resolutions that endure the desks of congress each day.

The website you mentioned is written about H.R. 6166, of which was a draft document. If you go to thomas.loc.gov... (the official Congressional Bill website) you can search for the actual bill that people may reference on their websites. When you do search, be sure to include the 109th Congress for the majority of bills you are questioning. The bills you need to pay particular attention to are the "ENR" bills, of which have been agreed to or passed by both House and Senate... which these are the ones the President would be to sign.

Now, after you search has been entered, and the bills have been identified... pay close attention to the ending of the bill name. There are different "prefixes" and "suffixes" that determine which each are. Here's the examples.

prefix - description - example

HR - Bill originating in the House of Representatives - H.R. 120
S - Bill originating in the Senate - S 5
HRES - Simple House Resolution - H.Res. 221
SRES - Simple Senate resolution - S.Res. 12
HJRES - Joint resolution originating in the House - H.J.Res. 150
SJRES - Joint resolution originating in the Senate - S.J.Res. 212
HCONRES - Concurrent resolution originating in the House - H.Con.Res. 5
SCONRES - Concurrent resolution originating in the Senate - S.Con.Res. 45
PL - Bill or joint resolution that has become public law - pl 107-25

Definitions of the Suffixes


(ath) Agreed to House
(ats) Agreed to Senate

This phrase describes concurrent or simple resolutions. These types of legislation are not "passed" in the manner of a regular bill; rather they are "agreed to" in the House or Senate.

(cdh) Committee Discharge House
(CDs) Committee Discharge Senate

This phrase describes a motion to discharge a committee from considering a bill. The motion requires a majority vote from that committee.

(cph) Considered and Passed House
(cps) Considered and Passed Senate

This phrase indicates that, after being debated, a bill has been voted on and passed by one of the two houses.

(eah) Engrossed Amendment House
(eas) Engrossed Amendment Senate

This phrase accompanies the final copy of a bill that has been passed by one house and certified by the Clerk of the House or the Secretary of the Senate. It includes the amendments to the text from floor action.

(eh) Engrossed in House
(Es) Engrossed in Senate

This phrase accompanies the final copy of a bill that has been passed by one house and certified by the Clerk of the House or the Secretary of the Senate.

(enr) Enrolled Bill

This phrase accompanies the final copy of a bill that has been passed in identical form by both houses. It must be certified by an officer of the house of origin (the Clerk of the House or the Secretary of the Senate) and then sent on for the signatures of the Speaker of the House, the President of the Senate, and the U.S. President. An enrolled bill is printed on parchment.

(ih) Introduced in House
(is) Introduced in Senate

This phrase indicates that a bill has been introduced in either the House or the Senate. In the Senate, any number of senators may introduce a single bill; in the House, a limit of 25 representatives may cosponsor a bill. Many bills are actually committee bills and therefore are introduced under the name of the (sub)committee's chairperson as a formality.

(pch) Placed on Calendar House
(PCs) Placed on Calendar Senate

This phrase accompanies a bill that is pending before committees of either house. The bill is assigned a calendar number, which determines when it will be considered by that house.

(rah) Referred w/Amendments House
(ras) Referred w/Amendments Senate

This phrase indicates that an engrossed bill has been passed from one house to the other, requesting concurrence.

(rch) Reference Change House
(rcs) Reference Change Senate

This phrase indicates a change in the referral of a bill, which requires the unanimous consent of the members of the house in question.

(rdh) Received in House
(rds) Received in Senate

This phrase indicates that a bill has been accepted for consideration in one house.

(rfh) Referred in House
(rfs) Referred in Senate

This phrase indicates that, after being introduced, a bill has been directed to the committees that have jurisdiction over the subject with which the bill is concerned. (Bills are referred by the Speaker in the House and the Presiding Officer in the Senate.)

(rh) Reported in House
(RS) Reported in Senate

This phrase accompanies a committee's report of its findings and recommendations to the parent house after it has examined a bill. The version of the bill as reported includes changes, if any, that have been recommended by the committee.
source


I encourage you to continue to pay close attention to bills you might find commentary about on the internet or from other media forms. Each one that passes through congress nibble away at our futures.



As far as the photocopies... be ready to join a detainment camp.


Here's more reading material for you. Enjoy.

www.abovetopsecret.com...
www.abovetopsecret.com...
www.abovetopsecret.com...


Info

[edit on 1/13/2007 by Infoholic]



posted on Jan, 13 2007 @ 12:59 PM
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Wow

Nice post chocked full of information.



posted on Jan, 13 2007 @ 01:21 PM
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Originally posted by DontTreadOnMe
Unless you have new informtaion to post here, there are several thrads from last fall on H.R. 6166
Merely posting a link with little of no commentary does not provide me good debate.


There is an article there saying that legally speaking the MCA didn't pass. It needed 67 votes and only got 65. I would consider that to be new information. Does anyone have any additional info on that?



posted on Jan, 13 2007 @ 01:43 PM
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Well, I'm not a rocket scientist, but here's my math...


65 votes for ...
divided by
99 total voters ...
equals

.656565656565656565656565656 (blah blah blah)

two thirds is equal to .66, right?

2 ...
divided by
3 ...
equals
.66666666666666666666666666666667



Now, considering the "round up to the nearest one" rule in math...


Even if you don't use that "rule", you can't get much closer with the number of voters. I suppose you could push the issue with the Supreme Court and have the bill denied unless they can get one more vote for the bill. However, I wouldn't hold your breath to think they wouldn't be able to get that one.

I'd say they achieved 2/3 vote.


Does that mean the Law is ok? No. Just means, IMO, it was voted in correctly.

[edit on 1/13/2007 by Infoholic]



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