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Canadian coins bugged, U.S. security agency says

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posted on Jan, 11 2007 @ 08:31 AM
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From a CBC News Technology & Science article

Source



Canadian coins containing tiny transmitters have mysteriously turned up in the pockets of at least three American contractors who visited Canada, says a branch of the U.S. Department of Defence.

Security experts believe the miniature devices could be used to track the movements of defence industry personnel dealing in sensitive military technology.
...
The counter-intelligence office of the U.S. Defence Security Service cites the currency caper as an example of the methods international spies have recently tried to illicitly acquire military technology.
...


As I find more sources I will post...but in the meantime I wonder when was the 1st instance of a coing being bugged?




posted on Jan, 11 2007 @ 08:47 AM
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No doubt this has been going on for many years, and surely in the US as well.

But probably the last place I would think this tracking device was made in would be Canada. This is the red herring. You wouldn't make a tracking device into a coin in your own countries money. You would have to ask yourself, "who would want to track these contractors and for what purpose?" Its obvious that some government is funding this project due to the height of technology required, not to mention the counterfeiting involved, this is no amateur project.

It would seem that the terrorists in Iraq and Afghanistan would not have the means or technology to achieve this, but it would also seem that these same terrorists knowing the movements of these contractors and whereabouts at all times would recieve the most benefit from this knowledge. So what government would want to help these insurgents in Iraq or Afghanistan?

My money is on Iran or possibly Syria, but lets hope its not China or Russia.

[edit on 11-1-2007 by super70]



posted on Jan, 19 2007 @ 07:43 AM
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Debunked?

www.wtlv.com...



WASHINGTON (AP) -- Reversing itself, the Defense Department says an espionage report it produced that warned about Canadian coins with tiny radio frequency transmitters was not true.

The Defense Security Service said it never could substantiate its own published claims about the mysterious coins. It has begun an internal review to determine how the false information was
included in a 29-page report about espionage concerns.



posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 06:04 PM
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I am interested in seeing how the falsification was put into the report myself I doubt maliciously but perhaps ignorance or sensationalism?



posted on Jan, 24 2007 @ 10:28 AM
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If someone wanted to track people... it wouldnt be done through coins.

Has anyone stopped to think of the logic behind that accusation?

If you place a tracking device in money, you arent going to track the person, you're going to track the MONEY. Last I checked, money is for spending. Woah, revelation?

You really want to track someone, put the tracker in something that would stay with the person for a while, like a watch, his shoes, the collar of his jacket, etc.

If there actually were tracking devices in money, they wouldnt be there to track people, they would be there to track the money.

Besides, a transmitter small enough to fit inside one of our coins wouldnt be capable of long range.

A: Power supply, the power supply required for even short range weak signals is still too large to be effectively used in a coin.
B: Antenna space, the coin itself isnt large enough to be anything more than a very short range transmission antenna.
C: On top of that, the transistors, capacitors, resistors, and whatever circuitry you are using on top of that in the coin, has to fit along side the power supply, and then still have the coin maintain its size, shape, and weight.

I know theres technology out thre we havent gotten our hands on yet, but a long range transmitter would not work within a coin.
If it were a transmitter, it would have to be the passive RFID style transmitter which requires no power supply. But RFID only works within a foot from it. So how you're going to track someone with that, I dont know.

"Excuse me, can I see your wallet?"
"Why?"
"I have to scan it for RF chips for... my... uh... report"

Come ON !



posted on Jan, 24 2007 @ 11:33 AM
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Imagine less of a tracking device than a monitoring one. Recording conversations, or perhaps the electronic signatures of some radar they can't get to easily.

So what better way than to give them coins which they'll gladly carry around the building for you? And then either drop them in a vending machine for you to carry out (coin machine guys aren't usually cleared) or that will go out the very specific exits which you can sit near with your van o' electronics, polling the coins for the recordings?



posted on Jan, 24 2007 @ 04:52 PM
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Originally posted by johnskyIf you place a tracking device in money, you arent going to track the person, you're going to track the MONEY. Last I checked, money is for spending. Woah, revelation?
...
Besides, a transmitter small enough to fit inside one of our coins wouldnt be capable of long range.

A: Power supply, the power supply required for even short range weak signals is still too large to be effectively used in a coin.
B: Antenna space, the coin itself isnt large enough to be anything more than a very short range transmission antenna.
C: On top of that, the transistors, capacitors, resistors, and whatever circuitry you are using on top of that in the coin, has to fit along side the power supply, and then still have the coin maintain its size, shape, and weight.


That was exactly my first thought when I saw this! Even if you're just using a passive RFID system, it's one of the most ridiculous methods of tracking something ever invented. Coins get lost and mangled and stuck in vending machines. I could just see some super agency trying to interrogate a Coke machine.



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 07:11 AM
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What if Paris Hilton got one of those coins? I Kinda feel sorry for whoever is on the other end listening....



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 09:07 PM
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Originally posted by Tom Bedlam
Imagine less of a tracking device than a monitoring one. Recording conversations, or perhaps the electronic signatures of some radar they can't get to easily.

So what better way than to give them coins which they'll gladly carry around the building for you? And then either drop them in a vending machine for you to carry out (coin machine guys aren't usually cleared) or that will go out the very specific exits which you can sit near with your van o' electronics, polling the coins for the recordings?


I suppose if you embed a metallic substance in the coin that isnt normally found in day to day life, you could use radar imaging to find it. But then what? So you know where he is... but then again, the guys in the radar van, pointing the equipment at him, could probably already have told you that.

It still doesnt make sense. Using coins for tracking people is redundant... and if I might say, pretty moronic.

Sure, they would be happy to take the coins from you, but they would be equally eager to find somewhere to spend them. Hence, woops, all you did was track them to the nearest store or vending machine. You could have done that with your eyes.

No. Transmitters are still better off embeded in clothing, shoes, laptops, cellphones, etc.

It is no doubt to me, as mentioned earlier, that the original report is absolutely bogus. All just hype. Which is so much easier now that the borders are tightening, people will look at other countries with alot more suspicion and hysteria than before.

Plus... its Canada, you know, the country that is obsessed with promoting peace. What would Canada want with spying on US political members? We can simply walk down there ourselves and see what theyre up to... we'd probably invite them for a beer when we get there.



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 09:41 PM
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im not supprised at all. The New Zealand coins are all microchiped so the machines you put the money into can tell what coins you put in, i wonder what other things the chip can do.



posted on Jan, 26 2007 @ 01:48 PM
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www.rfidjournal.com...

From the site above we have:


µ-Chip (pronounced mu-chip). The chip is just 0.3 millimeters square, roughly half the size of the smallest RFID chip on the market.


This was Old News in 2003 ...






The chip operates at 2.45 GHz and stores a 128-bit number based on the "mu-chip ID number criterion" developed by Hitachi, which issues the numbers. The number is written to the chip during the silicon fabrication process and cannot be changed. The current mu-chip can be read from about a foot away (30 cm).


Now an Active RFID tag is about the size of a Coin and can be read up to
approx 300 feet
Source:
en.wikipedia.org...

Now If I were an engineer I would try to develop an RFID chip that will
tune into any wifi network found in the area, and use this as a means to transmitt the data. This way there would be no need to have you followed wifi takes care of this (wifi networks are expanding).

The 100 feet for passive RFIDs is now a possibility if the Department of defense or espinage were to spend their time in developing such a tracker no?

RIID + wifi

And to take it even further hook it up to Google earth (cheating husbands will have a reason to worry )




posted on Jan, 26 2007 @ 03:06 PM
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Nothing wrong with the mu if all you need is a serial number and you don't need to read it from much of a distance.

With the built in crappy loop on the chip, the read/write distance is only about 2cm. To get that foot, you'll need a loop antenna the size of a business card.

If you had a way to get the coins back, you could put a recorder on there. A CVSD recorder chip is only about .2" x .4" with 15 minutes of memory onboard, you can add an hour or two to it in about .2" x .2". That's just the first bare die part I ran across, I'm pretty sure you could use some of Microchip's little reduced 8 bit processor parts and still do a fair recording algorithm, they are about .1" square.



posted on Jan, 26 2007 @ 04:14 PM
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The title made me think all canadian coins were bugged at first



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