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Great Britain going to the moon by 2010

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posted on Jan, 10 2007 @ 04:52 AM
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Britain could soon be going to the moon under plans submitted to the UK space exploration funding body, the BBC has learnt.



The Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council said the UK could launch a probe by 2010.


This probe will fire darts in the moons surface, penetrating 2 metres deep, to measure possible earth quakes, and an insight as to whats going on in the core.

Do you think if we find anything "ET" like, would we be more open than NASA?

This is good for science within the UK, as well as helping find a suitable spot for future manned landings, by the US.



Video -here

More on this

Here

According to Dr Andrew Coates, of the Mullard Space Science Lab and who has contributed to the concept study, the impactors would represent the first time there had been a detailed study of the Moon's sub-surface.



"There have been 12 astronauts on the Moon and more than 40 unmanned probes and yet we know surprisingly little about our nearest neighbour," he said.




[edit on 10-1-2007 by Denied]

[edit: title - Brition to Britain]

[edit on 1/10/2007 by 12m8keall2c]




posted on Jan, 10 2007 @ 03:24 PM
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It's very sad that the best we can come up with is to sent a probe to the moon by 2010.

Will we be rewarded by the US for this help? Sending a Brit on one of the missions?



posted on Jan, 22 2007 @ 07:38 AM
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I hope the funding body can support the project, but knowing how any sort of funding works in the UK I would suggest a timescale of 2010 is a tad ambitious.

Considering some of the most eminent scientific minds have come from the UK (Hawking, Newton etc) the government seems reluctant to stick any real cash into the subject. The best example I can think of this comes courtesy of my partner; she works in one of the UK's leading universities, and is constantly berating the lack of funding her own department (philosophy and psychology) receives. The reason they don't get any funding? Funds that are reserved for them (and other subject areas) are diverted to the scientific departments, because they are so badly funded by the government and they need the money simply to survive, let alone do any serious scientific research. A very sorry state of affairs indeed, it's no wonder that we lag behind other countries when it comes to facilities. The fact that our scientists still manage to come up with groundbreaking work is something that amazes me.



posted on Jan, 22 2007 @ 12:15 PM
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If this mission goes forward, it will be interesting to see if the Brits choose to go with the orbiter/penetrator combination, or with the (IMHO) more ambitious lander. Personally, I would rather see a lander mission, although I can certainly see the science benefits of the penetrator mission.

In either case, the video describes the goal of this mission as being a "scouting" expedition to find an appropriate location for establishing a manned presence on the Moon. Hopefully this signals an interest on the part of the ESA to take a more active role in exploration of space beyound LEO.



posted on Jan, 22 2007 @ 12:22 PM
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Seems an expensive and overcomplicated way of establishing a suitable base site; wouldn't orbital devices bouncing radar off the moon's surface be more effective?

[edit on 22-1-2007 by Ross Cross]



posted on Jan, 22 2007 @ 12:32 PM
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Originally posted by Ross Cross
Seems an expensive and overcomplicated way of establishing a suitable base site; wouldn't orbital devices bouncing radar off the moon's surface be more effective?

[edit on 22-1-2007 by Ross Cross]


Well, could a orbital device capture "Moon Quakes" and other details of the Moons sub-surface?


The darts could carry a small suite of instruments, such as seismometers to listen for "Moonquakes". Analysing these tremors would give scientists new insight into the make-up of the lunar interior.



According to Dr Andrew Coates, of the Mullard Space Science Lab and who has contributed to the concept study, the impactors would represent the first time there had been a detailed study of the Moon's sub-surface.


Maybe you have a point, but it seems we don't know everything about our closest neighbour.


"There have been 12 astronauts on the Moon and more than 40 unmanned probes and yet we know surprisingly little about our nearest neighbour,"

"Previous missions have focused on the side of the Moon that faces the Earth. Our plan with Moonlight is for the first time is to explore the mysterious far side of the Moon as well."



Taken from original source posted.

[edit on 22-1-2007 by Denied]



posted on Jan, 23 2007 @ 08:23 AM
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My professional opinion is that the Brits will not be part of the 2020ish manned moon mission which is unfortunate. 1st, Britain would have to reverse its "astronaut ban" which also applies to contributions to manned spaceflight other than actual people. 2nd, metal is already being cut on the (prototype) next generation of manned vehicles and the world's space agencies are already batting around distributed participation. The ball is already rolling.

My prediction is that the next few temporary crews to the moon will be American followed by an American and Japanese "permanent" crew. Europe (sans the UK) will likely be represented a few rotations later. This assuming that NASA/USA* decides not to go it alone which is very possible (and probably the best decision from a practicality standpoint).

* it's probably going to be a political decision rather than one based on science or engineering.



posted on Jan, 23 2007 @ 06:43 PM
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As a brit the Idea of us getting into space is cool, even if just probes.

Getting people on Mars would be beyond cool, the moon is a steping stone, so sending the robots there in the first instance cant be bad, detirmine all the varibles etc, Beagle was a kick in the teeth.

Moon quakes - mabey they will detirmine it is hollow after all



posted on Jan, 24 2007 @ 03:48 AM
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Originally posted by Denied
Do you think if we find anything "ET" like, would we be more open than NASA?
[edit on 1/10/2007 by 12m8keall2c]

NASA has been completely forthcoming. It's a civilian agency which requires minimal clearance ("I agree not to sabotage the space assets of the USA...").

Regardless, it's not really worth contemplating as there aren't ETs on the moon!



posted on Jan, 24 2007 @ 08:18 AM
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I have always wondered why britain was behind in science and technology more specifically, space exploration. I guess being an island nation you dont get alot of opportunity to go shoot into the heavens. Im sure the US would give you all the help you need. Best in the world afterall and britain second only to the USA.



posted on Jan, 25 2007 @ 06:42 AM
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Whats the fuss about ?
We sent a probe to Mars four years ago... Granted it didn't work seeing as we made it from out of egg cartons and stickyback plastic using schematics lent to us by Blue Peter but we still got there:

www.beagle2.com...




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