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NASA's Betrayal: Going Metric

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posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 02:03 PM
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This could be a sign that American industries are getting ready to retool.

A former boss of mine once told me that America will switch to metric when the automobile and heavy equipment industries are ready as this will entail retooling of the manufacturing processes.

There will be a large economic impact involved and nothing of this sort can happen without Industry giving the go-ahead. I don't see that happening until they figure out a way to pass the cost off to consumers.


NASA is either leading the way, or planning to do a good deal of out-sourcing.




posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 02:12 PM
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That's a very interesting point Psy.

I'm not an expert (by a long shot) on international business, but it does make sense.

Your mention of the auto makers is what I'm talking about by the way.

If any members have been paying attention to the detroit car show this week it's all about China gettting into the american auto game.

Just a thought.

Spiderj



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 02:13 PM
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Originally posted by Flyer
Your idea is totally inefficient and is only bought up because you think "American is best" and they cannot possibly have a worse system than the rest of the world.


Nothing is totally efficient, both systems have coexisted in the US for some time now. General population uses standard, companies or professions with international business use both. Also, I believe I repeatedly said that SI is easier to use and understand. However the reason why I see a change (now) unnecessary is because our current systems has worked so far, if it isn't broke...

[edit on 9-1-2007 by WestPoint23]



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 03:34 PM
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Originally posted by Rockpuck
We are the only industrialized nation on earth that does NOT use the metric system.

I cannot use it effectivly and I blame the education system for teaching me miles and not kilometers.


exaclty

Instead of making it simpler and easier (for all nations) by using metrics US has to differentiate themselves by using inches and so forth. WHY?

They are only making it harder on their own people.

Same example could be applied to many things. Even soccer.
A penalty kick everywhere else in the world is taken by shooting the ball from the penalty kick to the goal.... in US the penalty kick is taken the same way as in hockey by running from half court. WHY?

why do they have to do this? This is one thing I do not understand.



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 03:48 PM
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Originally posted by theTRUTHtheWAY
e.

Same example could be applied to many things. Even soccer.
A penalty kick everywhere else in the world is taken by shooting the ball from the penalty kick to the goal.... in US the penalty kick is taken the same way as in hockey by running from half court. WHY?

why do they have to do this? This is one thing I do not understand.


Are you sure about this? I've never seen a penalty kick ANYWHERE where the shooter ran up from half court. They certainly don't do that in Canada ( but we are metric LOL).


A penalty kick results from a contact foul or hand ball by the defending team within the penalty area – the large box on either end of the field. So it’s a type of direct kick also.

The ball is placed on the penalty spot, 12 yards in front of the center of the goal.

All players must remain outside the penalty area and the penalty arc until the ball is kicked. The goalkeeper must have both feet on the goal line until the ball is kicked.

If after the ball is kicked, it rebounds off of the goal or the keeper and stays on the field, the ball is “live” and anyone can play it.


I know, I know, way off topic, I'm sorry.



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 03:56 PM
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Yeah, I saw it with my own eyes on TV. It was in major league soccer I believe.



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 04:06 PM
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Originally posted by one_small_step
mwhaaaaaahaaaaaaaaaahaaaaaaaaa and soon the Americans will drive on the left hand side of the road. The plan is working.

Seriously though, coming from a metric country, the imperial measurements irritates me to no end. I can't wait to throw out my imperial toolset. Cmon, who uses a 3/8th spanner anyway



I do, i work for a American company in the uk and all the tools that they send us use imperial ,but on the other hand all the tools sent from Europe use metric.
It does get confusing at times



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 04:14 PM
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I don't see why you hate the metric system so much, nor do I understand how it could ever possibly be more confusing then the American measuring system. I'm sorry but 12 inches in a foot, 3 foot in a yard, 5280 feet in a mile? They all seem like arbitrary numbers. I mean how easy is it for you to convert tsp's and tbsp's to cups or ounces? The metric system works in even units of ten, it couldn't be any easier. You tell me what makes more sense, a unit of measurement where water freezes at 0(everything about=water, eveything below=ice), or a a system where water freezes at 32?? No doubt there have been american innovations, but as for accuracy this american measuring system sucks.



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 04:18 PM
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The only betrayal involved is that committed by those who believe that there is some perverse merit in retaining an archaic and utterly irrational system of measurements when just about everyone else in the world uses something far more logical thus isolating you unnecessarily and making life far more complicated for your kids than it ever needs to be.

The only upside is that the USA actually manages to make the UK look almost progressive in this matter despite our futile attempts to cling on to imperial nonsense.

[edit on 9-1-2007 by timeless test]



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 04:32 PM
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Originally posted by theTRUTHtheWAY
WHY?

why do they have to do this? This is one thing I do not understand.


Why do you care? Seriously, we have our way of doing things you have yours.



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 04:34 PM
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Originally posted by WestPoint23

Originally posted by theTRUTHtheWAY
WHY?

why do they have to do this? This is one thing I do not understand.


Why do you care? Seriously, we have our way of doing things you have yours.


Well, end of thread I guess. Nobody should care and nobody should debate the issue according to you it seems.

See ya ;-)



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 07:46 PM
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Retooling the industry would create a good share of jobs. Jobs the Detroit motor workers would probably welcome. But the question is, who pays for all the retooling necessary to keep these jobs in the country?

That's what TPTB have to know before they give the ok to go metric. You don't think Exxon/Mobile intends to give up any of their enormous profits, surely?

But if Catepillar and other construction equipment manufacturers want to stay competitive globally, retooling they may just have to do.



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 08:20 PM
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I don't think this has anything to do with car manufacturers. NASA has been working internationally with other space agencies for decades. Considering that missions they are planning now will be far bigger in scope it stands to reason they will want even MORE cooperation with the international community. We don't have to change to metric all at once, we can phase it in gradually. People will get it, it's not hard.

Edit: and just to add, the only difficulty in switching to metric is that we dont' generally visualize things in metric units. However if we started measuring say... distances between cities in kilometers instead of miles we would be able to visualize the distance easily since we would already have a mental picture of that distance in miles. I admit htat I don't have an easy time picturing kilometers, but that's because I never use them. I know that Los Angeles is about 900 miles from where I live, and if tomorrow the highway sign said X-number of km's I'd have better idea. It's just something that you have to learn gradually.

[edit on 9-1-2007 by Langolier]



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 08:36 PM
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Originally posted by Thousand

The imperial measurement system is the one that makes absolutely no sense. The Mile is (or was) based on a totally arbitrary value, and the terms Furlong, Rod, Cubit, etc, mean very little when compared to each other. There's 8 of one in another, or 11, or some other value. Take the Cubit for instance, which was defined as the length of the average person's forearm...I mean come on, these measurements, while standardized now, are of such abstract origin as to be mostly worthless in high-precision measurements.

[edit on 8/1/2007 by Thousand]


When exactly was the last time anyone used a cubit? or a furlong, rod, etc. Shesh. Thats it, measure the presidents thumb to find out how long an inch is. better get a hold of one of his feet for that matter.

I propose a new kind of mesurment system. So that all people on the globe are equily confused. Its just the fair thing to do.

The basic mesurement is a skosh thats exactly 24 nudges. 68 skosh's equl a shove. 93 shoves equil a haul and thats the new mesuring system.

Sorry, I agree the world just needs to go metric for crying out loud. I have no clue how to mesure things in metric and need to convert but why convert back to the old way. Just drop it like a bad habit and start using the metric system instead. people will get used to it. eventualy.



posted on Jan, 10 2007 @ 03:25 AM
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I am, as can be seen in the title, not a fan of this change. I do see how it's useful, but NASA is an American agency, and should therefore use the American measuring system.


Like it or not, the metric measurement system is a better and more logical system than the old imperial stuff. Yes, we here in Britain still use miles for speed limits and distances on signs, but we use metric for pretty much everything else.

It's also worth noting (as someone has already stated here) that one Mars mission ended in catastrophe because of simple confusion between metric and imperial measurements. Bearing this in mind, it makes sense to standardise. Some people don't like change, but sometimes you just have to accept it.



posted on Jan, 10 2007 @ 09:55 PM
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And I still think it's actually funny that there would'nt have been an
accident had NASA actually been using the American Imperial system.

As I've been asked a few times why I dislike the Metric system, I
suppose I should answer.

I generalized, I don't dislike all of it, but I do dislike many parts.
For example, in Metric I am 182.9 cm in height, yet in the American
Imperial system I am only 6'0, now in the metric system, it's a very
large number, and to me 6 feet is more imaginable, because it's not
a huge number.

As with Celsius, well it does make more sense to make 0 the temp-
erature that water freezes, but I still like Farenhight better, though
I do use them both.

And really, alot of Metric just sounds so cold, and (the bad kind of)
scientific.



I don't think America will ever fully change to the Metric system,
though we will most likely accept a hybrid version.

I don't think we'll keep Miles, Pounds, Feet and Inches for a very
long time, even if we are no longer a country, it will be so ingrained
into our culture, that it will still be used.

I do see the use of Celsisu either equalizing with or surpassing
Farenhight in the use of measuring temperature.


jra

posted on Jan, 11 2007 @ 12:22 AM
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Originally posted by iori_komei
I generalized, I don't dislike all of it, but I do dislike many parts.
For example, in Metric I am 182.9 cm in height, yet in the American
Imperial system I am only 6'0, now in the metric system, it's a very
large number, and to me 6 feet is more imaginable, because it's not
a huge number.


You could also just say 1.8m, it's a smaller number to deal with compared to 182.9cm.


I don't think America will ever fully change to the Metric system,
though we will most likely accept a hybrid version.


Canada does still have a bit of a mix. I know construction sites still work in imperial, at least the ones i've been on. And I know a lot of people (at least in my generation and older) still measure and weigh themselves in feet and pounds. But it will completely change over eventually, it does take a bit of time.



posted on Jan, 13 2007 @ 01:26 PM
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If children aren't taught the metric system, they'll have to learn it,(if they are going into an Academic Career). As someone who is currently studying Engineering beside some who have never learned the Metric system, I can attest to the massive superiority of the metric system for scientific measurements et cetera, because those that don't know it have to continually refer to Imperial measurements to learn what the hell they are learning! They also generally fall in the lower 20 percentile of grades in my experience.

Being a superior measuring tool is partly what it was DESIGNED for. (1cm^3 of pure water doesn't weight 1g at sea level for no reason, for example...).

As for NASA going metric, it's about damn time... it will help with interoperability with other agencies immeasurably.

[edit on 13-1-2007 by sardion2000]



posted on Jan, 13 2007 @ 04:00 PM
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Just thought I'd point out that there's a discussion about this on Slashdot today. Head on over to check it out.



posted on Jan, 14 2007 @ 12:11 AM
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FWIW, the metric system really isn't 'superior'. Its more consistent internally, than the usual non-metric alternatrives (centimeters to meters, compared to inches and feet to cubits, or square meters of volume compared to meters of length, versus gallons compared to feet, etc).

But the system itself is just an arbitrary system.

The idea of the metric system was born out of the enlightenment. The literati wanted a measurement system that was more 'rational'. So they looked to nature to find out an 'objective system of measure'.

But there is no such thing. They simply ended up substituting one base, the size of the earth (which the meter is calculated from), for another (like, the length of the average forearm for cubits).

True, the metric system is more internally consistent, but we could also make up any internally consisten system. Heck, we could have one based on, say, an inch. And then just have 'deca-inches' deci-inches, centi-inches, kilo-inches, etc.

And the metric system is based on multiples of ten, but we could've just as easily have used six fold mutliples.

Infact, we still don't say that a circle is divided up into 10 degrees, or a hundred degrees, its divided up into 360 degrees. We could just as easily divide it into a hundred parts and say 'one of those is a degree'. And say that our days are 10 'hours' long, and a week is 10 days, and a month is a sensible number of weeks, and there is only 10 months, all of the same length, etc.

Indeed, after the revolution, the French, who still maintain THE official meter, the one by which all other meters are measured and defined (its in paris i beleive), re-organized their calender to a more 'rational' system, where the months were named the equivalent of "Spring" "Hot Time" "Snowy Time" etc (or some such).




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