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NASA's Betrayal: Going Metric

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posted on Jan, 8 2007 @ 10:31 PM
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What strikes me is what has stuck in the US. Soda and liquer. 2 liter bottles of soda and 750 ml of liquer. Less for the same cost. It used to be two quarts and a fifth gal. Why have not the farmers converted from a gallon of milk? Too hard to make new containers for 3.5 liters? Would we see we were getting less?




posted on Jan, 8 2007 @ 10:39 PM
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Eh, it doesn't matter to me. I think in Imperial system, but face the facts the rest of the world uses metric, its just easier.

Also am I the only one who thinks its ironic that you have a very Japanese avatar?



posted on Jan, 8 2007 @ 10:45 PM
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Originally posted by Kacen
Also am I the only one who thinks its ironic that you have a very Japanese avatar?


I had'nt even thought of that, but it used to be the Japanese
empire, so Imperial.

I know, not the same.



posted on Jan, 8 2007 @ 11:22 PM
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I think America should change to metric because it would be way easier if we just used the same measurements as everyone else. Like when i talk to my friends in Canada. I tell them it's 50 degrees here, they think i mean 110 degrees F, and everyone gets confused. I really wish i had just learned metric in school.



posted on Jan, 8 2007 @ 11:35 PM
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Originally posted by Thousand
Then you're missing the point of making the change. It's not to "conform or go with the crowd". It's for the sake of interoperability.


And you've obviously missed my point as well. As I said earlier NASA and other major agencies, even some professions, should switch to SI if they want to. However the general population should still be taught the standard systems and all in house products and services should still be in standard.


Originally posted by Thousand
The imperial system of measure is outdated...


Eh, why do you care? It's worked for us so far and I can hardly call our current situation outdated so why not let us less sophisticated people stick with such a bad system?



Originally posted by Thousand
...and America is one of the last countries on Earth still using it as a basis for the majority of its measurements. It only makes sense to make the change.


Is that what's really keeping you awake at night? And there goes that crowd mentality I was talking about.


Originally posted by Thousand
If you don't want to conform, fine. Stay with apple pie, cheese steak, big cars, baseball, all that.


We will. And we will also continue to use "an outmoded, complex, and hard to use measurement scheme for the sake of "being different". Because it has not been counterproductive for us and I see no reason why being "different" is wrong in this case nor why people like you are complaining. If the imperil system bothers you so much you have a choice of not using it. All you have to do is reside in a country that uses SI.



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 12:37 AM
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There are conversion charts available for Machine Shops and places from suppliers all over the country, you might contact the local Machine Shop Tools Supplier to get some.

I still have some trouble with Metric, but then, I hate dealing with numbers anyway.



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 12:46 AM
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I'm Canadian, and I have had to learn both, and I use both daily, I measure my height in ft. and inches. because to me, being 180 cm, makes far less sense then 5' 11". But Km's is a far superior measurement in my opinion then miles, for one reason being half a km is 500 meters. how many feet are in a half mile?...2640 ft hmmm thats a little silly no?? and not easy to think of in your head. sorry, lets use yards, I'm sure that will be a more even number... wait... 880??

congrats to NASA for getting with it, space looks like its future is metric


I will still reference my cars acceleration in 0-60, and my fuel economy in mpg. because thats what I grew up with



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 01:34 AM
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It would make things much easier if the whole world used one kind of measurement. The cost to change everything in the U.S. to metric would cost so much money its never going to happen. If it did happen it would probably take like 20 years for everyone in the U.S. to fully adjust. I learned my metric convertions but the problem was we never used them out of school.



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 03:11 AM
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Originally posted by WestPoint23
And you've obviously missed my point as well. As I said earlier NASA and other major agencies, even some professions, should switch to SI if they want to. However the general population should still be taught the standard systems and all in house products and services should still be in standard.


Now that makes even less sense than the whole country going either way.


Eh, why do you care? It's worked for us so far and I can hardly call our current situation outdated so why not let us less sophisticated people stick with such a bad system?


I care because it causes a lot of difficulty with a lot of systems and a lot of people. I'm not poking at your situation, you're being defensive about something that I'm not even talking about. And as far as it working out well up until now, that doesn't mean it will in the future. Take for instance that the EU is going to ban non-SI marked items from entering their borders in 2010, that could cause a bit of an issue.

I did notice the attempt to shoehorn in an "us-and-them" misdirection there, just so you know.


Is that what's really keeping you awake at night? And there goes that crowd mentality I was talking about.


Again, you read too deeply into what I'm saying. I'd think you're trying to make me say something I don't at all mean, and I won't take the bait. As far as crowd mentality goes, it's one thing to get a Jennifer Aniston haircut because everyone else has one. What I'm talking about is smoothing out an obvious wrinkle in world business and economics. These situations are not the same.

Sometimes, believe it or not, change is good.


We will. And we will also continue to use "an outmoded, complex, and hard to use measurement scheme for the sake of "being different". Because it has not been counterproductive for us and I see no reason why being "different" is wrong in this case nor why people like you are complaining. If the imperil system bothers you so much you have a choice of not using it. All you have to do is reside in a country that uses SI.


I'm not complaining, but I think you're taking this a bit personal which is absurd. This isn't a national pride issue which you're trying to make it. It's a sensibility issue, as in "it's easier, more efficient, more flexible, why not go with it" type of debate. You're positioning yourself as a spokesperson for your entire country and taking offense to something that never happened. The parting shot of "if you don't like it, move to russia" is a bit...oh, I don't know...talking pointish?

And I do live in a country that uses SI, thanks. And yes, there is confusion in dealing with American companies because of the imperial system.

[edit on 9/1/2007 by Thousand]



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 06:29 AM
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In 1970 there was virtually no metric usage in Australia but by 1981 most of our conversion was complete.

The reason why it was so easily adopted by people like my dad and my grandfather is that it is SO DAMN SIMPLE!

10mm = 1cm
100cm = 1m
1000m= 1km

1000g = 1kg
1000kg = 1 metric tonne

See a pattern emerging here? All ones and zeros!

Most of the names of the measurements give it away as well ie. Kilo = 1000

The imperial system really is outdated and too complicated for any practical use when compared to metric.


(just in case.... mm = millimeter cm = centimeter km = kilometer)



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 06:48 AM
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Originally posted by acura_el2000
I'm Canadian, and I have had to learn both, and I use both daily, I measure my height in ft. and inches. because to me, being 180 cm, makes far less sense then 5' 11". But Km's is a far superior measurement in my opinion then miles, for one reason being half a km is 500 meters. how many feet are in a half mile?...2640 ft hmmm thats a little silly no??

I will still reference my cars acceleration in 0-60, and my fuel economy in mpg. because thats what I grew up with


I`m from the UK, and I do the same as you. I measure temp in celsius, drink litre`s of water, but I`m 5 feet 3 inches tall and I live a mile and a half from my work. Using both systems together can work.



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 09:41 AM
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Originally posted by Thousand

Originally posted by iori_komei

Honestly, I hate metric, not only does most of it make little
sense to me, but I've never been good at conversions.

Comments, Opinions?


The imperial measurement system is the one that makes absolutely no sense. The Mile is (or was) based on a totally arbitrary value, and the terms Furlong, Rod, Cubit, etc, mean very little when compared to each other. There's 8 of one in another, or 11, or some other value. Take the Cubit for instance, which was defined as the length of the average person's forearm...I mean come on, these measurements, while standardized now, are of such abstract origin as to be mostly worthless in high-precision measurements.

Take metric. While its distance units were originally based on the circumference of the earth, they have since been standardized to the speed of light and basically every unit in the metric system is a derivative of this. For instance, a cube 10cm on a side (1/10th of a metre) will hold 1 litre of water. A litre of water usually considered to be 1 kilogram in weight. Speaking of water, it freezes at 0C and boils at 100C...and 1 calorie will raise the temperature of 1g of water by 1C. Very simple. Calling the change a "betrayal" is a terribly uninformed statement. The title of the thread should have been "NASA: Getting with it, going Metric".

As an aside, I have to point out that the strangest thing I recall from my first trip in the US was the road signs. 3 1/4 miles to the next exit? Fractions on a road sign? That, for some reason, stuck with me for quite some time. It was a very alien concept.

[edit on 8/1/2007 by Thousand]



You took the words right out of my mouth! I lived in England several years ago and has had this metric vs. imperial debate many times, and I agree totally with you here. Science uses the SI system, which is metric, and all calculations are basically a lot simpler in metric, especially if you want to do quick calculations in your head. Granted fractions are actually more accurate than decimal numbers, but they are a nightmare to work with! Try adding upp a bunch of /8's /12's /36's and /16's in your head!


To those of you who think this is a betrayal: The rest of the world has learned english just so we can communicate with you people, so it's not too much to ask that you adopt the metric system for scientific projects. So what if most americans can't convert the distance from the earth to the sun from miles to km? Does this really affect your life?



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 11:25 AM
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Let's face it:


By the 1960s, the majority of nations were on the metric system and most that were not had started programmes to fully convert to the metric system (metrication). As of 2005 only three countries, the United States, Liberia, and Myanmar (Burma) had not completed the changeover.
The United Kingdom completed its legal transition to SI units in 1995. Wikipedia



Is it not about time to "go with the crowd"?

Vaak



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 11:54 AM
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First of all, let me just say: FINALLY!



Originally posted by WestPoint23

Originally posted by lizziex3
The rest of America needs to follow in their footsteps.


Not really. I've never been a fan of conforming for the sake of it or going with the crowd. We have always used standard in the US and I see no reason why people outside the US have a problem with it. After all I don't complain that most European countries use SI nor do I think that they need to convert to standard, it's just fine the way it is.


I'll tell you why I'm bothered by it; tried to get an american-made pedal for my bass drum fixed. But I could not walk into any hardware shop to get a normal friggin' screw, nooo I had to go to some specialist importer to get a friggin' screw that was in friggin' inces not millimeters! And it was friggin' expensive too!

Welcome to the great happy metric family my dear lost imperial friends! Your lives will improve way beyond your imagination!



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 12:21 PM
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Originally posted by iori_komei
I do see how it's useful, but NASA is an a\American agency,
and should therefore use the American measuring system.

NASA is a scientific agency based in america, and, like pretty much every other scientific agency based in america, should use the metric system.

Actually, I don't mind them using metric for tool size, when
they're working one International projects, but when it's a
purely American project, they shouold use the American
system.


I hate metric, not only does most of it make little
sense to me,

Its multiples of 10.

but I've never been good at conversions.

This is rocket science. I think that they'd have a helluva lot more trouble doiung their conversions if they were ussing feet, miles, stones, or cubits or any other non-metric system.



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 12:26 PM
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Originally posted by WestPoint23
From a scientific and practical point of view is makes sense but they better not be broadcasting something lie like "that is the lunar capsule traveling at 26 thousand km per hour and it is about 120,000 thousand km from the Moon". Most people in the US won't know how to convert that into units they understand.

Most people in the US are idiots, what does that matter?
Most people in the US will use a moon base as a reason to think that they are better than the rest of the world, so maybe they should get a smack in the face like having to run to the computer to goolge up 'metric conversions'.

it better be standard or else they will lose even more interest from the general US population.

Thats going to happen anyway. Will Farrell is going to make a new movie at some point. And there are nascar races every year.


Even though metric is easier to understand ans use I still love my feet and inches.

Admitedly, it would suck to have some ask 'hey how tall are you' and respond "two" or something like that.



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 01:32 PM
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Originally posted by WestPoint23


As for the US converting, it's not going to happen, tried and failed, certain specific organizations and professions use SI but the general population never will. Money, time, tradition, conditioning, etc... Even though metric is easier to understand ans use I still love my feet and inches.

[edit on 8-1-2007 by WestPoint23]


I disagree. Here in Canada, they switched to the metric system while I was in school (yes, dating myself) and the transition was pretty easy. I guess I'm lucky that I learned both systems, but the metric system makes a lot more sense, and is pretty easy to wrap your head around.



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 01:42 PM
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Originally posted by apc
It's about friggin' time!

Now if only we can make everyone spell it metER... I can die a happy man.
Why, that's the incorrect spelling which was only changed so some of the less intelligent people of the US can spell it right.

As was sulphate, aluminium, neighbour etc



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 01:47 PM
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Originally posted by WestPoint23
And you've obviously missed my point as well. As I said earlier NASA and other major agencies, even some professions, should switch to SI if they want to. However the general population should still be taught the standard systems and all in house products and services should still be in standard.

That makes no sense, it would add to the work load and people would have to think in 2 systems. If they go metric, they would only have to think in one.

Your idea is totally inefficient and is only bought up because you think "American is best" and they cannot possibly have a worse system than the rest of the world.



posted on Jan, 9 2007 @ 01:58 PM
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well I for one think NASA going metric is fine and don't quite see what the big deal is over it, I use miles and kilometres, I've traveled a lot so it helps knowing conversions.

But as an American I would like to respond to this:



...only bought up because you think "American is best" and they cannot possibly have a worse system than the rest of the world.


Um how many "stone" do you weigh exactly?

Let's not throw stones at our inches.


Metric is not hard it's just a bit odd when you've been raised on feet and miles. So I say to all my american brothers and sisters, start teaching yourself Metric today and by thursday it'll be old hat.

IMO of course.

Spiderj




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