It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

What if you were asked to join their brethren...

page: 2
0
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 8 2007 @ 08:43 AM
link   
Joining freemasonry, never, why would I pay some fraternity just so I could be a member? It's ludicrous. Besides, I strongly oppose any secret society apart from the one I founded myself. And it's free, with no obligations, apart from total obedience and loyalty to it's fellow members. No one knows about it, that's how secret it really is.




posted on Jan, 8 2007 @ 11:03 AM
link   
Yes, if it's something that has it's goals/ideals set in line with me. Obviously no one would join any kind of society that they don't agree with. I wouldn't want to do anything I wasn't interested in. So if the right group came along and asked, I would say yes.


M74

posted on Jan, 8 2007 @ 12:06 PM
link   

Originally posted by Zhenyghi3) My religion forbids membership into Freemasonry.
And what religion would that be?



posted on Jan, 8 2007 @ 03:51 PM
link   
I was a frat member and was given invitiations to join a couple of fraternitites. Many fraternities have a ritual around giving bids (invitations to join) which involve candles, incense filled rooms, weird background music like gregorian chant, and members wearing robes. My frat sometimes used a ceremony, and sometimes did not, depending on whether we felt it would suit the personality of the person we were bidding.

These ceremonies can be mysterious and impressive to many people, especially if it is the first time they ever went through such a ceremony. These emotions the invitee feels can influence the decision to accept the invitation, and perhaps compel the invitee to accept the invitation when they should not. My advice to anyone who has ever accepted an invitation to join a frat under such circumstances is to remember that the scene you experienced was just a bunch of guys lighting candles, wearing robes they bought at K-Mart and playing a gregorian chant tape. There is nothing special or supernatural about the people behind the robes and candles.



posted on Jan, 8 2007 @ 07:20 PM
link   

Originally posted by chief_counsellor


If the Illuminati still existed, I most likely would not join them if they asked me. I would not join an organization that plots against my church.


To be fair, the Illuminati didn't plot against your church. Your church plotted against their political and religious liberties.



posted on Jan, 14 2007 @ 11:11 PM
link   
Why is it that most people have this desire to belong to organizations?
Be they religious, social, or political? I'm not a psychological type person, the thought process of other people just does not interest me, but it seems that people who join organizations are just looking to others to justify their own belief systems. Don't get me wrong, if thats your cup of tea and it makes you happy, then go for it, lifes to short to be miserable. For me, I'll pass on joining and search for true happiness from within. Peace.



posted on Jan, 14 2007 @ 11:19 PM
link   
Why maintain family connections after one is physically self-sufficient?

Why speak to the same person more than once (ie: have friends)?

Humans are social creatures, dude. It's kinda inherent to our make-up.






posted on Jan, 14 2007 @ 11:30 PM
link   
I agree Roark, human beings need social interaction


Whats more Dark.. while many groups are about validation through common beliefs, but thats not what freemasonry is about.. as is evident in that fact that they do not discriminate based on culture or religion.. the freemasons are about giving people the tools to find that peace and happiness within, and then giving them the tools to help those around them once they have found that peace



posted on Jan, 14 2007 @ 11:35 PM
link   
Good observations Roark, and I do understand that human are social beings. However, it does appear that many people look to much to others for happiness, by being around others who agree with them on whatever subject it is, they derive their personal happiness. Perhaps, I just do not have the "pack" mentality that others do.

Nicely stated Becon

[edit on 1/14/2007 by The Dark One]



posted on Jan, 14 2007 @ 11:45 PM
link   
^^^^^^ It is not a "pack mentality" at all for most members of fraternal or spiritual organizations, it is a desire for good fellowship and as with groups like the Hermetic Order of The Golden Dawn or the Fraternitatis Rosae Crucis a geniune desire for knowledge to better oneself* What could be wrong with that?

If asked to join a noble group, sure I would: as it stands anyone can apply for membership in the Order Of The Illuminati, they even have a website
as was discussed in a previous thread in this forum



posted on Jan, 15 2007 @ 07:16 AM
link   
As far as human nature towards group dynamics goes.

It would be difficult at best and impossible in most instances for any individual to reach their full intellectual potential without the nurturing support and comradeship of like intellects.

All of the great intellects of the time understood the necessity for interaction and exchange of ideals that is most often found in certain groups.

Contrary to what the comics show us, it is most often teams of like minded individuals that are responsible for our great discoveries. Not some scientist closeted away in a secluded laboratory.

Semper



posted on Jan, 15 2007 @ 07:30 AM
link   
If you have the desire to join go for it.

Although its hard to know what you getting yourself into (either good or bad) because I would imagine they keep certain things secret until you get up there in the ranks.

Satan followers! Satan followers!


Just pullin your leg.

Sal



posted on Jan, 15 2007 @ 07:41 AM
link   

Originally posted by Dragonlike
If someone from the Masons, for example, approaches you and asks you to initiate a membership with them, what would you do?


We got invited to a Klan meeting once. I took great joy in proclaiming that I was a northern Catholic and 'no thanks'.

I'm a bit anti-social and being in a club like the Masons isn't for me anyways - even if the Catholic church allowed it - which it doesn't.

[edit on 1/15/2007 by FlyersFan]



posted on Jan, 15 2007 @ 12:06 PM
link   
Someone actually asked you to go to a Klan meeting!!!!!


Now that would be hilarious....


What idiots...

You really need to post that entire story on ATS some time.. I would love to hear it..

Semper



posted on Jan, 19 2007 @ 01:41 PM
link   
I am a baby Mason. My Grandfathers were both Masons. I never knew, until responding to a call at the Lodge one day, how to join Masonry. All I was told when I was a kid was that Grandpa can't talk about that. I have passed my 1st degree, Blue Lodge, and took my Fellowcraft this week. I have been very happy with the way I have been treated and nothing I have done or heard goes against ANY teachings of my church. I am Presbyterian. I was not asked to join, but when I asked about it they treated me very well, and have been happy to add me to their rolls. When I joined, I lowred the average age from 80 to about 75. I am 34 years old and until recently the Lodge was dying off. That is the bad thing about not being able to search out membership, the more propoganda and lies are spread, the less likely people are to ask. I cannot and will not ask anyone to join. I will tell you that I have felt very welcome, very comfortable, and very happy with my decision to join. I have read many threads in this forum and have laughed at many ignorant posts made by people who claim to research the topic and what goes on in a lodge. Granted I am not a Master Mason yet, and there are many things that I am not authorized for yet, but my experience thus far has been a very positive one. The men of the Lodge I have met are all above reproach and honorable men in all their dealings.
Enough of me for now, have a very good day.



posted on Jan, 19 2007 @ 03:03 PM
link   
^^^^^^^^^ Just wait until you start eating babies and praying to Lucifer muahahahahah!!!!! Just kidding man, congragulations!



posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 02:51 AM
link   

Originally posted by FlyersFan

Originally posted by Dragonlike
If someone from the Masons, for example, approaches you and asks you to initiate a membership with them, what would you do?


We got invited to a Klan meeting once. I took great joy in proclaiming that I was a northern Catholic and 'no thanks'.

I'm a bit anti-social and being in a club like the Masons isn't for me anyways - even if the Catholic church allowed it - which it doesn't.

[edit on 1/15/2007 by FlyersFan]


I priest told me about a year ago that the second vatican council proclaimed that masonic membership was okay ... along with labor unions, boy/girl scouts, collegiate fraternities etc, which were previously interpreted as being forbidden.

PS Antisocial means destructive and sociopathic, not shy. en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 08:55 PM
link   

Originally posted by Adon
[q


I priest told me about a year ago that the second vatican council proclaimed that masonic membership was okay ... along with labor unions, boy/girl scouts, collegiate fraternities etc, which were previously interpreted as being forbidden.

PS Antisocial means destructive and sociopathic, not shy. en.wikipedia.org...

The priest is in error. The prohibition stands. The Revised Code of Canon Law (1983?) is ambiguous on the matter, but Rome recently issued a statement supporting the prohibition. Try a search on www.EWTN.com in the Q&A section.

Of course, Catholic individuals still join the ranks anyway...



posted on Jan, 21 2007 @ 12:36 AM
link   

Originally posted by The Dark One
Why is it that most people have this desire to belong to organizations?
Be they religious, social, or political? I'm not a psychological type person, the thought process of other people just does not interest me, but it seems that people who join organizations are just looking to others to justify their own belief systems. Don't get me wrong, if thats your cup of tea and it makes you happy, then go for it, lifes to short to be miserable. For me, I'll pass on joining and search for true happiness from within. Peace.


My take on it is if you are an insecure people, you may take comfort in the fact that the rigid structure and bylaws of the organization bind the members of the organization to you. If you belong to an organization like a fraternity, the friends you make in that fraternity supposedly have to stay by your side because they swore an oath to do so and you will meet them regularly as part of the organizations activities.

If you have a group of friends that form an informal group, your commitments and friendships to those friends can be just as meaningful as those of members of any fraternity or club, but they are not rigid and formalized. If a member of your informal group of friends does not show up to a couple game of cards, you may have doubts that your friend is still your friend. On the other hand, if one of your lodge buddies does not show up to a lodge meeting, you might take comfort in the fact that person is still your "brother."



posted on Jan, 21 2007 @ 06:51 PM
link   
I never joined out of insecurity or a need for comfort, but some people "may" and "might" have done so in the past. Your implication that this is a primary reason is a little condescending.

I would never begrudge anyone celebrating their independence (and/or eschewing membership in organisations), but there are some people who seem to have a slightly desperate need to do so...







 
0
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join