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Hitachi Introduces 1-Terabyte Hard Drive

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posted on Jan, 6 2007 @ 02:18 PM
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Thats very cool.

A 1TB drive would definately make a few or my programs run
smoother, without crashing the computer because of there size.


I do wonder how advanced computers wil be by 2020-2025.
Hopefully they'll be so advanced, that we won't need even more advancements for a few years, since about that time Moores law
stops, since chips can't be made any smaller than, and they'll
have to start using a new substrate for computers.




posted on Jan, 6 2007 @ 03:15 PM
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Originally posted by lovepens1
Remember the commodore 64...2400 baud modem

KICK ASS!!!


My first major computer had a whopping 20MB Hard drive and gargantuan 640K of memory LOL


The 1 terrabyte drive with the way things are going is going to be filled pretty quick anyway. It will be like having a 40GB hdd now in about a couple of years. Im very psyched about the new 32GB Solid State drive just recently introduced by Sandisk for notebooks. about 100 times faster then a regular ATA hard drive. Now thats going to kick some HDD azz. Its faster then a Raptor drive thats for sure. Its about 600.00 for the 32GB drive right now. In about a year tht will drop and bigger capacities will be available.



posted on Jan, 6 2007 @ 03:18 PM
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I remember a couple years ago, you could buy external 1 Terrabyte drives but the price was a grand though.



posted on Jan, 6 2007 @ 03:19 PM
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I remember a couple years ago, you could buy external 1 Terrabyte drives but the price was a grand though.

eh who still uses torrents, get away from peer to peer



posted on Jan, 6 2007 @ 03:34 PM
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Originally posted by Astral
eh who still uses torrents, get away from peer to peer


I still use torrents, and personaly I think I could fill the 1TB hd in a few months with all the programs I have and all the movies and all the music, I filled a 40Gb hd in about 2 days, I have an 80Gb ipod, well it was filled up the first time I pluged it in, so I really cant wait for this 1TB hd to come out, I just dont have any more room on any of my hd's, and I have a chronic downloading problem, and torrents just make it all the better.



posted on Jan, 6 2007 @ 03:38 PM
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Originally posted by iori_komei
I do wonder how advanced computers wil be by 2020-2025.
Hopefully they'll be so advanced, that we won't need even more advancements for a few years, since about that time Moores law
stops, since chips can't be made any smaller than


I can foresee nanotechnology taking a few giant leaps forward some time before moores law tapers down to near zero.

Already a lot of research is being done in this area.

Nanotechnology is the wave of the future!

Maybe by then, we will also have newer and better methods of data compression, so we won't need mega sized storage.


[edit on 1/6/2007 by Mechanic 32]



posted on Jan, 6 2007 @ 03:40 PM
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Originally posted by ThePieMaN
Im very psyched about the new 32GB Solid State drive just recently introduced by Sandisk for notebooks.



any info on that, sounds pretty awesome.



posted on Jan, 6 2007 @ 03:43 PM
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Originally posted by chissler
It is scary how fast we are advancing technologically.

The average user supporting a 1TB hd, imagine the efforts to actually fill that.

The 1TB Ipod next?


Just imagine 75 years ago we were just starting production combustion engines. Then funny around 1947 things just started to advance at a very rapid pace...Fast forward..I find it very strange that in our time line as society we moved very slow in technology up untill around the 1947 era and then we leaped in electronics about 20 years? Kind makes you wonder how or who gave us a boost in intellegence?



posted on Jan, 6 2007 @ 03:55 PM
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Originally posted by ThePieMaN

Im very psyched about the new 32GB Solid State drive just recently introduced by Sandisk for notebooks. about 100 times faster then a regular ATA hard drive.


w00t!

Now that's what I'm talking about! That's what I call future tech!

But of course, it is only good if the electronic storage used is highly durable, and completely non volatile. I could imagine stray static electricity, and Poof! the solid-state drive being rendered useless.

But as I have no real knowledge of the inner workings of one, I will have to wait and see how dependable they are.

Imagine now a 1 TB solid state drive using some form of nano electronics.

Yeah! Now that would be the bomb!



posted on Jan, 6 2007 @ 03:58 PM
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For the people saying that we already had 1TB drives: I don't think those were single drives. It was most likely a couple of drives in RAID. Hitachi is putting 1TB space on one drive.



posted on Jan, 6 2007 @ 05:00 PM
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Its nice to see storage catching up with processor capabilities and even better that ram technology is coming along nicely, guess the only real hurdle left is for the retards in the disk arena to decide if its going to be Blu-Ray or HD DVD thats the new standard for optical disks.



posted on Jan, 6 2007 @ 05:56 PM
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1 Terrabyte,....hmmmm


I guess Microsoft will find a way to bloat Windows enough in order to make use of it all.



My first pc (handbuilt from scratch),.... relied on the Kansas City Standard as (affordable) storage.

I mean who could afford a 178Kb floppy on an allowance anyways.


It worked Ok I guess, with 256 bytes of RAM. (yes, I said just bytes)

Course I used a steam locomotive to power it up.


Thank god the Zilog Z80 finally came out and made things so much bigger and faster.



posted on Jan, 6 2007 @ 06:45 PM
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Originally posted by tsloan

Just imagine 75 years ago we were just starting production combustion engines. Then funny around 1947 things just started to advance at a very rapid pace...Fast forward..I find it very strange that in our time line as society we moved very slow in technology up untill around the 1947 era and then we leaped in electronics about 20 years? Kind makes you wonder how or who gave us a boost in intellegence?


I don't think it's really that spectacular, the reason we advanced
so fast was because we had a few scientific revolutions at once,
and that allowed us to go forward faster than if we had had them
at different times, add that to it being the time where massive
amounts of money and resources were starting to be poured into
science and technology research by various governments/militaries,
and you can see how we advanced so fast.

In all honesty, we should be far more advanced than we are now,
but we are'nt because science was repressed for nearly a millenia
in the westrern world, and alot of science, well we had to rediscover.

Even nnow, we could be more advanced than we are, if scientists
were more open minded, and did'nt just assume because something
did'nt fit in their nice tidy box, that it was wrong, and did'nt deserve
any research.

[edit on 1/6/2007 by iori_komei]



posted on Jan, 6 2007 @ 07:06 PM
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It was right at ten years ago I bought my first computer, An Acer. It had 16 mbs of ram and a two gig HD. I figured i'd never be able to fill up a monstrous disk like that.


Now I have 160 gigs of HD and i'm burning stuff to DVDs and CD's because I don't have room for all the information.

I'm ready for a teraflop drive



posted on Jan, 6 2007 @ 07:40 PM
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This is surely cool, but it's processing power which needs to catch up. Storage has been way out ahead, wouldn't you say? I mean, I've never had a TB in my computer but I've come close with four drives of simple old 133 Ultra IDE. It's more about standards. Whatever standard gets on the motherboard, is what gets used by the builders.

No, I'll not be buying one of these single 1TB drives because I'd have to buy two of them to justify the risk; At this size, all your data is at risk. This means you must mirror the drive or have tape backup, but a mirror makes better sense because tape for a terabyte is insane.

Do you want your terabyte drive to fail? I realize drives are reliable but I change them a lot and know how often people lose all their data. I would rather have four 500gig drives which will surely be dirt cheap, and I can have 2 TB distributed such that one drive failure doesn't stop my work flow.

This is like the .44 Mag in the gun shop. Also it's in that guy's gun safe who never shoots it and cannot shoot worth a damn anyway. Better to be good with the technology (hard drives in general) than to brag about the size of one hard drive. One drive spindle is a lot to hinge your TB of data on. Now if I could get two of them, then yeah, it's a heck of a lot to put inside your PC, --But even then, wouldn't you rather have a portable USB 2.0 or Firewire drive outside your PC case? If I did buy one of these, I'd surely put it in an external case which is another 60 bucks or so.

[edit on 6-1-2007 by smallpeeps]



posted on Jan, 6 2007 @ 09:15 PM
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Originally posted by The Blade Runner

any info on that, sounds pretty awesome.



1Million Hour MTBF! Wow. Most HDD's are like 80,000 or so and even then I've had them die in a matter of days/weeks

Heres some info



SanDisk Corporation has introduced a 32-gigabyte (GB), 1.8-inch solid state drive (SSD) as a drop-in replacement for the standard mechanical hard disk drive.

Initially aimed at enterprise users as the first step toward mass consumer adoption, SanDisk SSD offers field-proven durability to keep mobile PCs working in the toughest of conditions and improves the overall user experience.

Previously, large capacity flash-based drives had been used primarily by the military, aerospace and telecom industries, which demanded high performance and reliability under challenging environmental conditions, according to a SanDisk official.

But now the declining cost of NAND flash memory has made SSD a viable and economically attractive alternative to existing technologies in a wider variety of applications, including mobile PCs aimed at enterprise and consumer users.

"This is an important milestone for SanDisk in our relentless quest to create new large-scale markets for flash storage solutions for consumers in the personal computing space," said SanDisk CEO Eli Harari.

Using NAND flash enhanced by SanDisk's patented TrueFFS flash management technology, SanDisk SSD delivers two million hours mean time between failures (MTBF) .

Source


If you go to google and type in Sandisk and click on News there are a few articles there.



posted on Jan, 6 2007 @ 09:53 PM
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Originally posted by ThePieMaN
Heres some info



SanDisk Corporation has introduced a 32-gigabyte (GB), 1.8-inch solid state drive (SSD) as a drop-in replacement for the standard mechanical hard disk drive.



Nice link PieMan. Here's more on this 32gig flash ram drive. 1500g's is pretty impressive. You could probably throw it at a brick wall with no worries. Plus heat and power are seriously reduced. I am thinking of Julian Simon's theory on how human ingenuity always trumps resource scarcity. If power and weight are reduced whilst durability is raised, this cannot be anything but the future.



www.tradearabia.com...

Though the SSD's price is high, its silent operation, light weight, incredible shock resistance, and low level of power consumption bolster its appeal. Our unit weighed just 1.6 ounces, compared to 3.5 ounces for a typical 2.5-inch drive; 1.8-inch SSDs weigh even less. Its shock rating is a whopping 1500G--it can withstand most shocks short of being fired out of a howitzer--far higher than a standard drive's 200G to 300G rating. And it draws a tiny 0.5 watt of power while active and 0.1 watt at idle, far less than common drives.


[edit on 7-1-2007 by smallpeeps]



posted on Jan, 6 2007 @ 10:17 PM
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Originally posted by smallpeeps

Nice link PieMan. Here's more on this 32gig flash ram drive. 1500g's is pretty impressive. You could probably throw it at a brick wall with no worries. Plus heat and power are seriously reduced. I am thinking of Julian Simon's theory on how human ingenuity always trumps resource scarcity. If power and weight are reduced whilst durability is raised, this cannot be anything but the future.



I remember years ago when they were first talking about Solid State drives, and I don't know if you remember them but 1GB hard drives back in the early 90's were Full Size drives/Dual Height 5.25x2 (Like a big brick) and the first solid state drive was about the same size as that but with only like a 5MB capacity. I don't really remember the specs because it was a long time ago now but this technology has been in the works for over a decade now. This little drive is just absolutely amazing compared to its prehistoric grandpappy.

Imagine getting an adapter to use like a current notebook drive adapter and sticking this little baby in a desktop system? Bootup would fly!



posted on Jan, 7 2007 @ 03:29 AM
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Originally posted by Neon Haze
The following is a commercially available external firewire 1TB drive... and could have been bought by the public as far back as the later half 2005...


for any member considering getting the 1tb lacie drive neonhaze showed - DON'T!

i have been through 2 of them already within the warranty time of the 1st one. they have a defective power supply which runs too hot, blows the casing of the power supply and takes out the hard drive (which is actually 4 hard drives in a raid-0 striped arrangement... lose one drive and you lose ALL your data).

lacie offer no data recovery solution and will only format if possible or replace your drives if faulty

we are still waiting for them to replace the last replacement drive which blew up and they no longer make the 1tb d2 bigger disk model you showed so we are not sure what they will do

they recently sent us with no explanation a separate power supply NOT of their manufacture despite saying ONLY to use lacie power supplies on their products. this however doesn't get all the data back that we lost (twice) and we are reluctant to have the same product/service again from them

you are much better off buying a few large capacity hard drives than buying a lacie drive because you at least have a chance of recovering your data should one fail



posted on Jan, 7 2007 @ 03:35 AM
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Originally posted by chissler
It is scary how fast we are advancing technologically.

The average user supporting a 1TB hd, imagine the efforts to actually fill that.

The 1TB Ipod next?


Honestly, I could fill it in about 1 month.

Its only 100-200 DVDs worth of data.




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