Ray_Mears

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posted on Jan, 10 2007 @ 03:16 PM
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Im not sure if ive just watched a history programme or a survival programme but because it wasnt rushed with too many topics covered if im ever near the coast living off the land(when the tide is out) what i saw was easy enough to remember
.

I wanna go catch me some razor shells
or atlleast take some salt and watch em pop up.



CX

posted on Jan, 10 2007 @ 05:23 PM
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Originally posted by trueskeptic
Im not sure if ive just watched a history programme or a survival programme but because it wasnt rushed with too many topics covered if im ever near the coast living off the land(when the tide is out) what i saw was easy enough to remember
.

I wanna go catch me some razor shells
or atlleast take some salt and watch em pop up.


Yeah i know what you mean about the razor shells, they were great to watch let alone eat!


I think i'm warming to the professor guy now, although he once again forgot to pack his tv charisma!

As you say though, the show dispayed enough basics to make the next trip to the beach an enjoyable one.

CX.



posted on Jan, 10 2007 @ 05:52 PM
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I missed tonite show due to dj in my loacal Am sure there a re run on sunday or somthing like that on bbc 3 or 4 anyone one know was it good prog 2?


CX

posted on Jan, 11 2007 @ 06:24 AM
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Originally posted by SE7EN
I missed tonite show due to dj in my loacal Am sure there a re run on sunday or somthing like that on bbc 3 or 4 anyone one know was it good prog 2?


I thought it was good. Definately a few things that could be used on your local shore. Quite a lot of historical talk, but then again it is about foragers from the past so i guess thats to be expected.

I would'nt say it's as exciting as some of his programmes, then again that depends on what part of the subject of survival interests you the most. I enjoy the shelter building and animal trapping and cooking more, but often the more boring parts of survival such as water procurement are the most important.

CX.



posted on Jan, 11 2007 @ 07:12 AM
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Actually I'd love to see him survive on just the food he can find in the UK. It would help prove his point and maybe he'd lose some of that weight.


I love Ray but like Oz's famed Bush Tucker Man you always suspect there's a Winnebago and some location catering not too far away


[edit on 11/1/2007 by Strangerous]



posted on Jan, 12 2007 @ 03:10 AM
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I thought the show was great


I honestly belive that the history part is extremely important... Our ancestors lived off the land for thousands of years and developed unique skills that enabled them to not just survive, but to thrive!!

The knowledge they developed over thousands of years has now all but been lost, in the last few generations, and unless we remember it now... we will spend another thousand years trying to rediscover it when/if situation X occurs.

These SAS type survival programs/books are all very well if what you want is excitement... and they will teach you how to survive... but if you want to enjoy your life long term you will need to learn the bushcraft/skills of our ancestors...

SAS type programs/books always assumes that you have modern knife/clothing etc... but what if your blade breaks? what happens when your windproof matches run out?? when your clothes tear???

We need to know how to start from scratch... and the best way to do this is to look at our ancient past


Love thoughs flint tools


CX

posted on Jan, 12 2007 @ 05:24 AM
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Originally posted by undercoverchef


These SAS type survival programs/books are all very well if what you want is excitement... and they will teach you how to survive... but if you want to enjoy your life long term you will need to learn the bushcraft/skills of our ancestors...

SAS type programs/books always assumes that you have modern knife/clothing etc... but what if your blade breaks? what happens when your windproof matches run out?? when your clothes tear???

We need to know how to start from scratch... and the best way to do this is to look at our ancient past




I could'nt agree more undercoverchef.


I, like many others here began my survival interest/training in the forces. however a lot of this training (not all) relies on equipment in survival kits carried in vehicles, or like you say, good kit to assist you in your survival.

I don't think thats always a bad thing, i mean any help in a survival situation is welcome. What becomes dangerous is when people become complacent with regards to the basics. You hit the nail on the head exactly when you said, "What if your blade breaks? What if the clothes rip?"

The flint tools were indeed great. In fact, anyone who has used flint as a blade will know that they can often be better than a knife for sharpness. Theres an abundance of flint in most places, yet most people only go out with one knife, and often a crap knife at that.

Ray Mears adds the history of our ancestors to his survival programmes which makes them fascinating. It's good to have a reminder that survival has'nt just been around since Crododile Dubdee!


CX.



posted on Jan, 16 2007 @ 05:06 PM
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For those lucky enough ray is ack this wednesday and TONIGHT at 1:25 bbc1.

This week ray is compareing todays microwaves meal's and fast food snacks with a diet of wilted nettels and berries asking if in an age wh obesity is a growing problem in Britain and can anything be learn from a stoneage diet.



posted on Jan, 17 2007 @ 12:23 PM
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I actually don't think Bushcraft is that great of a show. There is very little actual survival information, compared to him talking about the history of an area, bragging about how beautiful an area is or the people that occupy it, etc. And when he does give useful information, he doesn't give much specifics.

As far as British "Survival" shows go, I say "Danger: Incoming Attack!" is the best that has made it's way over to North America for me to see. It has a bit of comedy thrown into it, but it's 90% useful knowledge.

They also have a good show here in Canada called Survivorman where a guy gets dropped off into various places like the desert, the rainforest, Canadian wilderness in winter, etc, and has to survive for a week and film it all alone. I'd say that's the best of the three.

[edit on 17-1-2007 by Yarcofin]



posted on Jan, 17 2007 @ 05:34 PM
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Guess you never seen the other stuff ray has done then? They dont compare to him at all in my opinon.



posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 02:55 AM
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I actually don't think Bushcraft is that great of a show. There is very little actual survival information, compared to him talking about the history of an area, bragging about how beautiful an area is or the people that occupy it, etc. And when he does give useful information, he doesn't give much specifics.


This is just one series of many that Ray has done... in some of the others he does deal with "survival" in much more detail but i think Ray Mears is trying to get us to understand that in order to truly thrive (not just survive) you need a deep respect of nature and to learn from those who did thrive (our ancients and modern day aboriginals)

Survival is not some grand battle against nature... its about learning to live in harmony with nature... But i guess it not for some people...

for me its the grown ups survival program.



posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 08:42 AM
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Originally posted by undercoverchef

for me its the grown ups survival program.


At least someone else has got the Idea of rays work thank you and not some third rate tv show like danger attck funny as it was but thats not survival in my books.





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