It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

F15 has mid-air and lands with only one wing (video)

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 31 2006 @ 01:50 PM
link   
I thought this was pretty awesome...



[edit on 31-12-2006 by mrwupy]




posted on Jan, 1 2007 @ 03:36 AM
link   
Yes, this tape is very well-known and it's truly amazing that a plane can fly without one wing. I remember when I saw this for the first time and I didn't believe my eyes.

In the tape they said that the plane was able to stay in the air because the body of the plane generated enough lift with the remaining wing, if I understood correctly. The pilot used the afterburners, because as my mentor (Waynos
) once told me the faster a plane goes, the more lift a surfase generates per given area. So basically the plane could stay in the air because the lifting surfase that remained produced enough lift because of the high velocity.

Could somebody enlighten me how the plane didn't start to spin?

[edit on 1-1-2007 by Figher Master FIN]



posted on Jan, 1 2007 @ 03:46 AM
link   
I am greatly impressed with that pilots skill most people would have paniced.



posted on Jan, 1 2007 @ 08:36 AM
link   
Great video

got to say the eagle is one of the finest aircraft made



posted on Jan, 1 2007 @ 09:23 AM
link   


Could somebody enlighten me how the plane didn't start to spin?


someone correct me if i'm wrong, but i think this can be achieved by varying the amount of thrust produced by the 2 engines. this as well as very precise manipulation of the remaining control surfaces might have been the factors which prevented the aircraft from going into a spin.

but you'd have to be one helluva' pilot to do what this guy was able to do.


anyways, thats my 2 cents



posted on Jan, 1 2007 @ 02:26 PM
link   

Originally posted by Figher Master FIN

Could somebody enlighten me how the plane didn't start to spin?

[edit on 1-1-2007 by Figher Master FIN]


I'm not sure of the moment required, but quite a bit of the early research for flat spin recovery/prevention by swept wing twin engine fighters was performed by F-15's or F-15 scale models, so I'm sure some of the info has worked it's way into the more modern variants. I did notice in the video that the right engine was still wide open, while the left looked like it had been throttled down. I wasn't able to play the video with sound on, but supposedly the pilot was demoted upon landing for not following his superior's order to eject, and then promoted immediately after for saving the aircraft.



posted on Jan, 2 2007 @ 06:48 AM
link   
In order for there to be a spin, the airframe has to stall. If enough thrust is produced that enough lift is produced, then the aircraft will not stall if kept within it's critical Angle of Attack.

Shattered OUT...



posted on Jan, 2 2007 @ 09:37 AM
link   
Now that we came to talk about angle of attack, I've understood that a plane can manage to keep in the air (when flying upside down) having a high angle of attack? Does a high angle of attack produce lift? and if so, in what way?

[edit on 2-1-2007 by Figher Master FIN]



posted on Jan, 2 2007 @ 03:47 PM
link   

Originally posted by Figher Master FIN


Could somebody enlighten me how the plane didn't start to spin?


Alot of port yaw trim and max power.



posted on Jan, 13 2007 @ 02:53 PM
link   

Originally posted by Figher Master FIN
Now that we came to talk about angle of attack, I've understood that a plane can manage to keep in the air (when flying upside down) having a high angle of attack? Does a high angle of attack produce lift? and if so, in what way?

[edit on 2-1-2007 by Figher Master FIN]


The F-15 being flat like it is, the fuselage forms almost another wing as the airflow travels over it. That's one of the ways that he was able to save the plane.

AoA actually kills lift, because you have more air hitting the flat portion of the wing instead of travelling over it. The higher the AoA the closer to a stall you get and the less lift you have. AoA is the angle of the nose over the horizon. Straight and level is 0 degrees, a climb going straight up is 90 degrees.



posted on Jan, 13 2007 @ 04:27 PM
link   

Originally posted by toreishi



Could somebody enlighten me how the plane didn't start to spin?


someone correct me if i'm wrong, but i think this can be achieved by varying the amount of thrust produced by the 2 engines. this as well as very precise manipulation of the remaining control surfaces might have been the factors which prevented the aircraft from going into a spin.

but you'd have to be one helluva' pilot to do what this guy was able to do.


anyways, thats my 2 cents






That show the reasons why who anyone have F-15 should keep it for other forty to seventy years... Try to mastermind these jets being powered by twin F135 with 80,000 plus lbs of thrusts! It would increase the flight performance by extesitque ten-fold, I can bet that!



posted on Feb, 17 2007 @ 07:50 PM
link   
>The F-15 being flat like it is, the fuselage forms almost another wing as
>the airflow travels over it. That's one of the ways that he was able to
>save the plane.

Actually most modern aircraft have a lifting body design. The F-15 as well as MiG-29 etc. derive a nice portion of their total lift from the fuselage. In effect it is a wing, although with different physical properties.

>AoA actually kills lift, because you have more air hitting the flat portion
>of the wing instead of travelling over it.

The higher the AoA, the greater the lift and the greater the drag.

>AoA is the angle of the nose over the horizon. Straight and level is 0
>degrees, a climb going straight up is 90 degrees.

AoA is measured in relation to the velocity vector(the direction the aircraft is actually moving).


Andy



posted on Feb, 17 2007 @ 09:55 PM
link   
You have the wrong definition of AoA.

Your Alpha is the angle relation of the relative wind to the wing-chord line. Not all aircraft can reach extreme angles of attack because they do not produce enough thrust to over come the change in airflow.

To begin to understand what AoA is to begin to understand an aircraft's limitations. Keep in mind that because of this, an aircraft can stall at an airspeed and any attitude.

Shattered OUT...



posted on Feb, 18 2007 @ 01:22 AM
link   
Firstly the fact that he didn't eject is absolutely unbelievable..

Secondly more AoA will obv. provide more lift, though it will induce drag and slew velocity..
Flying a plane like that is tough enough.
I can't possibly imagine how touch it must've been to land!!

The shock of the undercarriage hitting the tarmac would've been enough to detstabilise landing posture!

Probably the CoG of the airframe is so very concentrated and the center-to-tail area that any landing impact would not have yawed the aircraft too much..

Also that horizontal tailfins would contribute to some lift on the 'missing side'..

All said he would've still had to land the thing with asymmetric yaw thrust!!



posted on Feb, 22 2007 @ 05:34 PM
link   
You wrote:
>AoA is the angle of the nose over the horizon. Straight and level is 0
>degrees, a climb going straight up is 90 degrees.

I wrote:
>AoA is measured in relation to the velocity vector(the direction the
>aircraft is actually moving).

You wrote:
>You have the wrong definition of AoA.

Wiki writes:
Angle of attack (α, Greek letter alpha) is a term used in aerodynamics to describe the angle between the airfoil's chord line and the direction of airflow wind, effectively the direction in which the aircraft is currently moving. It can be described as the angle between where the wing is pointing and where it is going.

It appears that I did have the right definition of AoA.

Andy



posted on Feb, 23 2007 @ 10:04 AM
link   
Ok.. He didn't eject because he didnt know..
I was wondering what could've possessed him to land with one wing!!!



new topics

top topics



 
0

log in

join