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Pratt and Whitney's Next Move?

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posted on Dec, 30 2006 @ 03:46 PM
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I've been poking around Wikipedia and other websites looking at a whole bunch of different aircraft. After a quick bout of comparing different engines and such, I started wondering: What is Pratt and Whitney's next move here? The F135 engine for the F-35 aside, what else is being developed/planned?

Thanks to all for any previews/clarifications, I'm really looking forward to seeing what is next in America's bag of tricks.




posted on Dec, 31 2006 @ 02:47 PM
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Geared Turbofans.
These are supposed to provide a 10%+ improvement in efficiency.



posted on Jan, 1 2007 @ 01:23 AM
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Originally posted by Darkpr0
What is Pratt and Whitney's next move here? The F135 engine for the F-35 aside, what else is being developed/planned?

How about various combined cycle units giving an air vehicle the ability to go from takeoff to hypersonic with one engine yet utilizing a sequential methodology to achieve it's terminal performance as well as exotic systems using common fuels, etc.

Examples:

Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) engine - a scramjet with rockets imbedded in the internal flowpath. With this engine approach, the rockets are operated initially, up to a flight speed of Mach 3 or 4. The rockets are then turned off, and the engine is operated in ram/scramjet mode to Mach 7-8 for hydrocarbon fuel, or Mach 12-15 for hydrogen fuel.

Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) system - turbo-ramjet engines are used for flight up to Mach 4, and then separate ram/scramjet engines are used for flight up to Mach 7-8 (hydrocarbon fuel) or Mach 12-15 (hydrogen fuel).

Hypersonic Scramjets running on hydrocarbon fuel mixtures

standard Turbofans running on alternative fuel sources.



posted on Jan, 3 2007 @ 12:07 PM
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These speeds that could be achieved are remarkable, but have any methods been developed to dissipate all the heat for times that the aircraft might be cruising?



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