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Why Am I Running So HOT?

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posted on Dec, 27 2006 @ 02:21 PM
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I've had my computer for a few years now and about six months ago I started having trouble with the CPU temperature getting too high.

The problem initially manifest itself when graphics-heavy programs I was running (games like Far Cry or GTA:San Andreas) would automatically shut down.

I'm a novice when it comes to cracking open my computer case but I took the leap and opened things up. I dusted everything off and made sure that all my fans were working right, and even added an extra exhaust fan in the back (for a total of 4 case fans, plus the fans on the CPU (P4 3.2), the graphics card (NVIDIA FX5700-U), and the power supply.

I'm thinking about replacing the CPU heatsink.
I'm thinking about replacing the power supply.

But the truth is I'm just grasping at straws.

Any ideas?
What am I missing?




posted on Dec, 27 2006 @ 02:38 PM
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Have you removed the fan and cleaned the fins on the heat sink?

The fins seem to be an ideal place for dust/smoke particles to accumulate.

Otherwise, your cpu may be telling you that it's on its last legs. But I'm no expert.

Just my 2 cents.

One other thing, what are your computers specs?

cpu, power supply, graphics card, memory, etc.

This information may be useful to help in determining possible causes.

edit = add.

[edit on 12/27/2006 by Mechanic 32]



posted on Dec, 27 2006 @ 02:46 PM
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Did you make sure the airflow is unobstructed? Do you have at least one intake fan?



posted on Dec, 27 2006 @ 04:00 PM
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If it's the first time you've cracked open that computer, it most likely is dust. From my experience, OEM supplied heatsinks for processors are often too small and inadequate to do their job for a very long time. Do try to dust it off well. To do so, you'll want to buy a can of compressed air from a computer or office supply store (although sometimes I've seen them at department stores like Target).

If you do decide to replace the heatsink, find someone who is comfortable with replacing hardware within the computer because processor dies are delicate, and if it cracks, you'll have to replace the processor as well. Also, make sure that you get decent thermal glue. It doesn't have to be top quality, but there's a lot of snake oil out there for thermal glue.



posted on Dec, 27 2006 @ 04:07 PM
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Originally posted by Mechanic 32
Have you removed the fan and cleaned the fins on the heat sink?


Yep. They were REALLY dusty and I gave them a very gentle tooth brushing. My temperature readings really dipped, but were still too high...and then they crept right back up again.



One other thing, what are your computers specs?


CPU: P4 3.2
PSU: (I have to admit...I'm not sure.)
GPU: NVIDIA FX5700 Ultra
RAM: 1g DDR
Motherboard: ASUS P4C800E Deluxe


Originally posted by sardion2000
Did you make sure the airflow is unobstructed? Do you have at least one intake fan?


I feel like the airflow should be decent.
I have three intake fans...a big one in the front and two pretty big ones on the side. And then I have an exhaust fan in the top rear of the case.



posted on Dec, 27 2006 @ 04:16 PM
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Reverse it. You only need one intake near a place where it can suck cool air in(away from any heating vents). You need to suck the hot air out. INfact my computer doesn't even have any intake fans, it just has an open vent that becomes a vacuum when all my other fans are turned on and blowing air out of the case.



posted on Dec, 27 2006 @ 05:07 PM
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sardion's right ...

a single intake, w/multiple exhaust fans, is a Cooler way to go.

Considering the "age" of the overall system, I would suggest a thorough cleaning. Disassemble any/all heatsink/fans units and wash them in a mild detergent solution, to remove residual oils and collectives (environmental and otherwise).

It would seem a prudent approach, regardless.

Visual "fuzz" and otherwise is typically a stage-two heat issue with regards to PC performance or heat issues.

$.02



posted on Dec, 27 2006 @ 05:10 PM
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You could have a bad processor or you could have a bad motherboard.

I have seen this a few times where the cpu overheats and it was a bad M/B-unstable voltage regulation or shorts.

Because it is a recent thing, something is failing-cpu or m/b most likely.



posted on Dec, 27 2006 @ 06:57 PM
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I too have had some heating problems with my CPU. My system is four years old though and I plan on upgrading soon. To be honest i'm waiting for Vista to come out so I can be a beta tester for Bill Gates. Anyway,

I bought an expensive heat sink, Did plenty of cleaning and had more fans running than I could count. Still my CPU got too hot. As a stop gap measure, since I don't plan on having this system much longer I built a little air conditioning unit for the CPU.

I took a good size plastic bowl that has a snap on lid, mounted a fan on the lid and ran a hose out the other side to the CPU cooling fan. When I know i'm going to be using anything intensive i fill the bowl with ice. It works like a charm.

I keep waiting for the explosion or sickening ZZZTTTT!!!! of death but so far so good.

I'm already shopping around for a new system....sometime within the next 60 days.



posted on Dec, 27 2006 @ 09:58 PM
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BTW, what temps did it run when new-no load and load and now no load and load.

It has occurred to me you might-it is cheaper- try cleaning the cpu and cpu fan contact points-alcohol- and reapplying new thermal grease.

hope that helps



posted on Dec, 28 2006 @ 12:18 PM
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Originally posted by mrmonsoon
BTW, what temps did it run when new-no load and load and now no load and load.


I found this rig used and practically STOLE it. (Which is why I can't complain really...I've had 3 years of flawless fun on it...) So I can't really tell you what it was like new.

NOW, however, my cpu temp sits at a MUCH too high 120f when the machine is idle, and will hit the 150s before automatically shutting down games. (Only with games will the temperature spike like that...with other stuff, it will sit in the 130s.)

Here is my gameplan:

1) Give everything a good dusting and cleaning. Also move a few of the "wire piles" around in my case to ensure unobstructed airflow.

2) Switch my case fans so that there is only one input and three exhaust fans.

3) Replace the power supply. (ASUS Probe is showing that the rotation speeds on my fans are low - e.g., 2600 on my CPU fan - could this be a symptom of inadequate power?)

4) Clean the cpu and heatsink, apply new thermal paste.

5) Replace the cpu heatsink.


If I'm still having problems after all that, then I would guess that I'm looking at a cpu or motherboard that is about to go t.u.

Any steps I'm missing to try to solve this problem?

Thanks to EVERYONE for your help, I really appreciate it.



posted on Feb, 1 2007 @ 01:31 PM
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I'm on step five of my computer cooldown plan.

I have a big ol' ZALMAN CNPS7000-Cu that I'm going to throw on top of my CPU and if that doesn't do the trick...well...

I've never replaced a heatsink like this before.

Any advice?


Edn

posted on Feb, 2 2007 @ 07:58 AM
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On my computer I have an 80mm intake fan, 80mm cpu fan, 80mm CPU exhaust fan (its attached to the vent on my case in front of my cpu), a 120mm exhaust fan, and a 120mm and 80mm fans on my PSU.

The design of your case can also play a big part in cooling, I have a Coolermaster Centurion 5 and its been nothing short of fantastic when it comes to cooling, although I did replace the stock 80 & 120 fans with Akasa 80 & 120mm Amber series fans which have been great at pushing the air through so far, my case is cool and quiet.


I'm fairly sure Pentium 4's run hot normally, I know my laptop P4 can run really hot up to the 60's (140F) when playing games, to be honest it shouldn't affect the CPU that much my P4 on my laptop can run up to 200C before having to automatically shutting down with no real ill effects afterwards although in the long term it wont be good for the CPU.



posted on Feb, 2 2007 @ 12:29 PM
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I have had this problem, I got it from playing games that my graphics card couldn't take.
The screen would black out, I would have to reset, the graphics cards heated up so much it would burn my fingers, I'm not talking it was warm, I mean red hot,, it was old with a fan rather than the little metal pronged thing that is on new ones, but the fan graphics card will still play games but not for more than an hour.

I would say you need a new graphics card, one that will take the games you want to play...



posted on Feb, 2 2007 @ 03:21 PM
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My graphics card is a GeForce5700 Ultra.

I feel like if my GPU is the problem then it's because it's broken, not because it's being overpowered.

My computer shut down Motocross Madness 2 the other night. Not exactly a taxing game.

We'll see though...



posted on Feb, 28 2007 @ 12:16 PM
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I pulled the old CPU heatsink off to find the thermal paste on my processor to be all crusty and nasty (not surprising).

I cleaned everything off, put a new coat of yummy thermal paste on, and replaced the old heatsink with a big pretty Zalman.

During that process I removed too much of the CPU base and this little plastic backing piece came loose underneath the motherboard. Soooooooo....I ended up having to practically take apart EVERYTHING to lift the motherboard up and get that piece back in place.

Luckily, this afforded me the opportunity to give a thorough cleaning to practically every component in the case.

Long story short, my CPU runs about 30-40 degrees cooler and I played Far Cry for three hours straight the other night without a blip.

Productivity = Low (and falling once I get Half Life 2 loaded up...)
Computer Confidence = High

Thanks to everyone for your help.



posted on Mar, 7 2007 @ 07:50 PM
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Hey I work for Dell and due hardware warranty support. Since you already cleared the dust out, here are a couple of questions.


1. Does the computer turn off?

2. Does the fan run loud?

3. Does the case get hot?

4. Is there adequate ventalation?(is the vent on the back or bottom covered?



posted on Mar, 8 2007 @ 11:47 AM
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Originally posted by perfectdeception
Since you already cleared the dust out, here are a couple of questions.



I'm feeling happy because it's running great now after I replaced the CPU heatsink.



1. Does the computer turn off?

No. The computer wouldn't shut all the way off. Specific programs (graphics-heavy games) would shut down.


2. Does the fan run loud?

Nope. I'm not a good judge though. Fan noise has never really bothered me.


3. Does the case get hot?

Externally? No. It was always cool to the touch. The internal case temp would get pretty high...so high that I question the accuracy of the sensor...but the case never felt anything but cool to the touch.



4. Is there adequate ventalation?(is the vent on the back or bottom covered?


Plenty of ventilation.

I think the problem was that the thermal paste was all crusty and nasty and the heatsink was just getting overpowered by the CPU.

That's my (very layman) opinion.



posted on Mar, 13 2007 @ 02:08 AM
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Originally posted by Essedarius

Originally posted by Mechanic 32
Have you removed the fan and cleaned the fins on the heat sink?


Yep. They were REALLY dusty and I gave them a very gentle tooth brushing. My temperature readings really dipped, but were still too high...and then they crept right back up again.



One other thing, what are your computers specs?


CPU: P4 3.2
PSU: (I have to admit...I'm not sure.)
GPU: NVIDIA FX5700 Ultra
RAM: 1g DDR
Motherboard: ASUS P4C800E Deluxe


Originally posted by sardion2000
Did you make sure the airflow is unobstructed? Do you have at least one intake fan?


I feel like the airflow should be decent.
I have three intake fans...a big one in the front and two pretty big ones on the side. And then I have an exhaust fan in the top rear of the case.






are you overclocking?

p4 are notorious for running hot so you might wana change the whole cooling setup to something better goto new egg and check out reviews for heatsinks until u find one u like



posted on Mar, 13 2007 @ 11:59 AM
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Do you know what the adhesive is comprised of. By adhesive I mean the "gel" that holds your heatsink/fan to your CPU. If it is OEM, it might not be a good heat transfering compound. Also, you might want to get a fan with Higher RPMs. If you have an OEM GPU, you will end up with a miniscule fan and that will heat your system considerably. Another aspect you might want to look for is where is your PC located. If it is in a confined area, no matter how many fans you have, it will stay hot. Just some things to ponder.



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