It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Bird Flu Spreads in South Korea, Nigeria

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 26 2006 @ 11:24 AM
link   
South Korea is killing thousands of chickens and pigs to stem the spread of bird flu. The deadly H5N1 bird flu virus also is spreading in Nigeria, "one of three countries identified as least able to deal with the disease and prevent it from becoming a global pandemic."



S. Korea kills thousands of pigs, chickens to stem spread of bird flu

ASAN, South Korea, Dec. 24 (Yonhap) -- South Korean quarantine authorities said Sunday they have culled an additional 4,000 pigs and 2,000 chickens to prevent the spread of bird flu.

A total of 21,146 ducks, 2,820 chickens and 4,177 pigs have been slaughtered since Thursday, when the fourth outbreak of a highly pathogenic bird flu virus in a month was reported in Asan, about 90 kilometers south of Seoul.

***

South Korea slaughters pigs to stem bird flu outbreak

Ministry officials were not immediately available for comment, but Yonhap news agency said pigs are vulnerable to respiratory diseases and could spread viruses.

More than 1.1 million poultry had been killed in the earlier three outbreaks that hit the country since late last month.

South Korea slaughtered about 5.3 million birds during a bird flu outbreak in 2003.

***

Nigeria: Bird flu spreads

The deadly H5N1 bird flu virus has spread to two new regions of Nigeria, one of three countries identified as least able to deal with the disease and prevent it from becoming a global pandemic.

***

More Nigerian states hit by bird flu infection cases

The deadly H5N1 bird flu virus has spread in the last few weeks to two new states in Nigeria and reappeared in two others where it was believed to have been contained, officials said.

Nigeria is one of three countries regarded by experts as the weakest areas in the global attempt to stem infections among birds and head off a potentially devastating human flu pandemic. The disease was first discovered in the northwest state of Kaduna in February and it spread rapidly in the early weeks to 12 other states and the Federal Capital Territory, despite culling and quarantine measures.

Thousands of poultry have died or become infected in Nigeria since the H5N1 virus was first detected, hitting farmers badly.
Many Nigerians live on less than a dollar a day and are too poor to afford the luxury of rejecting infected or dead chickens, raising concern among experts on bird flu that Nigeria is at risk of becoming a permanent host to the virus. The risk is elevated with Christmas and the Muslim Eid festivals only days away because consumption rises.




Bird flu already is endemic in Asia - and now, it looks like it's moving into Africa.

The kind of hybrid that might result is anybody's guess. But dengue fever is epidemic in both areas, so a new disease probably will involve a flu-dengue fever hybrid.




posted on Dec, 26 2006 @ 09:01 PM
link   
Soficrow, Thanks for all the research and updates you have been doing on Avian Flu. I've been following your posts here for quite some time now. Excellent work!

Its funny how the news about the bird flu comes in waves. Just when I was starting to feel a little more hopeful that we were hearing the last on the bird flu, (like with SARS) here it comes back again, and maybe in the long run even stronger and more deadly.

I don't think there is much we can do about the bird flu, other than keep plenty of supplies around in case of a major outbreak of human to human spread bird flu. Having extra supplies around is not to difficult here in the states, but the poorer nations are in for a rough time no matter what happens. Not only is this a horrible virus, but economically it is a nightmare for the poorer countries.

The idea of flu-dengue fever hybrid is really frightening, lets hope this does not happen.



posted on Dec, 26 2006 @ 09:56 PM
link   

Originally posted by neo4116
Soficrow, Thanks for all the research and updates you have been doing on Avian Flu. I've been following your posts here for quite some time now. Excellent work!



You're welcome, and thanks neo.





Its funny how the news about the bird flu comes in waves.



Bird flu news heats up in winter cuz it's flu season.




...here it comes back again, and maybe in the long run even stronger and more deadly.

...The idea of flu-dengue fever hybrid is really frightening, lets hope this does not happen.




Did you miss this one? Beyond Bird Flu: The Perfect Microbial Storm

We're in for a rough ride. Probably sooner than later.

But whatever happens, whenever, MOST people will survive.

You're right though, stocking up is essential. It makes the difference between being able to stay inside where it's safe(r) - and having to go out for food and stuff.


[edit on 26-12-2006 by soficrow]



posted on Dec, 27 2006 @ 06:19 AM
link   
You have given some excellent information on the spread of avian influenza. However, some clarification is needed about the threat to humans. In Britain we were informed last year by our version of the US Surgeon General that roughly 4 million lives were at risk and that ommediate action had to be taken to ensure that vaccines were ready for the slaughter that was expected. My view is that the British Government were creating an atmosphere of fear by exaggerating the facts so that people were willing to give up more of their rights to people who "knew better." Isn't it ironic that the actual number of deaths made two figures, still sad and we mourn them, but the figure of deaths did not reach 100 (to the best of my knowledge).

And isn't it ironic that every politician who is ever interviewed about the subject states that the matter is too complex to be understood by schmucks like the general public and that only politicians with their superior intelligence can understand the complexities?

Nevertheless, I think that it is unlikely that there will be a hybrid 0f dengue virus (Flavivirus) and avian influenza (Orthomyxoviridae). You would need a large simlarity in their respective genetic materials (RNA-ribonucleic acid) for them to "swap" genes with each other. The greater likelihood is that two Type A Influenza viruses which infects humans, birds or swine are likely to co-infect a herd of pigs and then "swap" genes from each other from their segemented genomes. This would create a hybrid for which the immune system would not be ready and would overwhelm the swine. Humans in close contact with the herds could then be susceptible to infection. However close monitoring and quarantine of people involved in animal husbandry would preclude widespread infection into the wider community.
Keep up the good work.



posted on Dec, 27 2006 @ 09:36 AM
link   
Thanks for your response, input and compliments Heronumber. Much appreciated.



Originally posted by Heronumber0

My view is that the British Government were creating an atmosphere of fear by exaggerating the facts so that people were willing to give up more of their rights to people who "knew better." Isn't it ironic that the actual number of deaths made two figures, still sad and we mourn them, but the figure of deaths did not reach 100 (to the best of my knowledge).




I agree that the world's economic powers will use anything opportunistically, and use any situation to play for power and profit - including a pandemic threat.

But this does not mean the threat is not real - just that the situation and information is being manipulated to benefit the big boyz.

Ie., "It's not a conspiracy, just good business."

FYI - no one knows how many bird flu cases or flu-caused deaths there have been because testing is not routine, nor is it accurate.

Most confirmed cases required up to 9 tests before getting positive-for-bird-flu results. Currently, the WHO reports about 157 deaths attributable to bird flu.





Nevertheless, I think that it is unlikely that there will be a hybrid 0f dengue virus (Flavivirus) and avian influenza (Orthomyxoviridae). You would need a large simlarity in their respective genetic materials (RNA-ribonucleic acid) for them to "swap" genes with each other.




Microbiologists and other scientists have been warning us for some time that microbes are crossing species barriers. In fact, we now are facing hybridization across kingdom barriers.


The Perfect Microbial Storm

Scientists are warning that diseases like bird flu, anthrax and rabies could come together in what they're calling "the perfect microbial storm."

***

Reuters

"Almost every year there is a new disease appearing, and 75 percent of these emerging or re-emerging diseases are coming from animals; 80 percent of those have zoonotic potential," he said in an interview.

Le Gall said such zoonoses -- animal diseases that humans can also catch -- included Rift Valley fever, rabies and anthrax.

"These could come together to create what the experts are calling 'the perfect microbial storm'," he said.




The hybrids that appear will depend on what other diseases are co-infecting the host at the time of infection.

The pathway(s) likely involve new strains of the actin protein. Ie., see:



Actin' Like Actin?

The most biologically significant property of actin is its ability to self-associate and form two-stranded polymeric microfilaments. In living cells, these micro filaments form the actin cytoskeleton, essential for maintenance of the shape, passive mechanical properties and active motility of eukaryotic cells. Recently discovered actin-related proteins (ARPs) appear to share a common ancestor with conventional actin. At present, six classes of ARPs have been discovered, three of which have representatives in diverse species across eukaryotic phyla and may share functional characteristics with conventional actin. The three most ubiquitous ARPs are predicted to share a common core structure with actin and contain all the residues required for ATP binding. Surface residues involved in protein protein interactions, however, have diverged. Models of these proteins based on the atomic structure of actin provide some clues about how ARPs interact with each other, with conventional actin and with conventional actin-binding proteins.




The above study was done in 1996 - and the evidence suggests that new actin strains now appear with regularity. ...And actin is a key that can open virtually any biological lock.





The greater likelihood is that two Type A Influenza viruses which infects humans, birds or swine are likely to co-infect a herd of pigs and then "swap" genes from each other from their segemented genomes. This would create a hybrid for which the immune system would not be ready and would overwhelm the swine.




It would be great if that was all we had to worry about.

But the world has changed - at the molecular level as well as otherwise.

Our 'new world' has a huge number of 'appropriate hosts,' not just swine, and numerous candidate zoonotic diseases.

The fear now is that human flu will hybridize with say, a hemorraghic fever, and confer flu's virulence. The fact that bird flu has become endemic makes this much more possible and likely - and was predicted decades ago.





...close monitoring and quarantine of people involved in animal husbandry would preclude widespread infection into the wider community.




Even that theory doesn't wash any more. H5N1 bird flu vectors have NOT been identified - but it is clear that the virus is endemic because of its ability to spread via soil and water, at the least.

Also, many diseases that historically required direct contact or ingestion now spread via numerous vectors, including being airborne. For example, E. coli and rabies come immediately to mind as now airborne. Unheard-of and unthinkable, right?

Ie. see:



1,800 Species of Microbial Organisms Found in Texas City Air

A new "bacterial census" using a novel microarray found surprising microbial biodiversity - including bioweapons-related pathogens - in the air above San Antonio and Austin, Texas. "We're surrounded by bacteria, and they are not necessarily friendly," says Gary Andersen, a staff scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. J. Craig Venter of Celera fame is sequencing the metagenome of the air above New York City; he says microbial genetics is complex - and Andersen may be underestimating the microbial diversity in Texas air. "As weather patterns change, different things go up into the air. We could be changing what's in the air, and unless we know what's in the air now, we'll never know how it changes. It points to a real need for a microbial census," warns Ventner.




format

[edit on 27-12-2006 by soficrow]




 
0

log in

join