area 99 info wanted

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posted on Dec, 9 2003 @ 07:52 AM
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I've Never Seen ANY evidence to suggest that there are Any Areas numbered in the 90's. So I have no reason to assume that there is an "Area 99". Remember, These Areas are secret, so we can only go on what they have leaked.

Tim




posted on Dec, 9 2003 @ 07:55 AM
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Originally posted by ihatethisplace
disregarding are 51 what happened to areas 1- 98?

i was wondering the same thing about areas 1-50....are there such things?....and with area 51 hangar S-4...are the more "S" hangars....and whats in them?



posted on Dec, 9 2003 @ 08:08 AM
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There are no Areas in the 90s, most go up to 60. Only 5% of the Areas are bases, the rest were used for nuclear testing during the manhattan project and still used today to test new aircraft and other black projects



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 12:33 PM
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No such place, the highest the number of slots goes is either 51 or 61 but i can't remember. If anyones wondering all of the different areas are for the testing and development of weapons and aircraft.



posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 03:12 AM
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The numbered areas originated way back when Nellis Range was first established, back before WWII. Most of the numbered areas are in the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly NTS), established in 1950, which is owned by the DoE and used for atomic tests and related experiments. Area 51 is adjacent on the east to the NTS' Area 15, and was the site of a WWII aux airfield, then established as a secret area under the CIA in 1953. It was turned over to the Air Force in 1977.

The only other numbered area that I know of is Area 52, which is the Tonopah Test Area, northwest of Area 51.

A good map overlay for Earth is available from the User Community for Google Earth. It names and delineates all the areas in the NTS and has flags in the others; it also annotates all the nuclear test areas and every nuclear test executed all over the world, and a lot of other interesting related places.



posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 04:38 AM
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warehouse 13 tv show, depicted more warehouses lol.

I have never heard mention of area 99



posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 11:00 AM
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reply to post by puncheex
 


The numbered areas did not originate before World War Two. They originated with the establishment of the Atomic Energy Commission's nuclear proving ground which came to be knows as the Nevada Test Site (now, as mentioned, renamed the Nevada National Security Site). Several areas were added adjacent to the original NTS boundary including Area 13 (site of the Project 57 safety experiment in April 1957), Area 31 (a buffer zone adjacent to the western edge of Area 25 near Yucca Mountain), and Area 51 (the boundary of which was established in 1955 when the CIA built Watertown Airstrip at Groom Lake, but which was not added to the NTS as a numbered area until 1958). Tonopah Test Range has been listed in official documents as Area 52. The Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) in Hot Creek Valley was designated Area 58.

Some area numbers have been changed. Area 25 used to be Area 400 and Area 401. To add confusion, Tonopah Test Range is subdivided into areas with some numbers duplicating those at the NTS (Area 2, Area 10, etc.). Also, some people confuse Air Force range numbers (such as Range 61, etc.) for area numbers but there is no correspondence. The geographical placement of the assigned areas has no basis in logic, common sense, chronological order, or geography. It appears to be entirely random.



posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 11:54 AM
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Do you think he meant Area 19, the one with the supposed power line that goes to no where?



posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 06:03 PM
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Originally posted by Shadowhawk
reply to post by puncheex
 


The numbered areas did not originate before World War Two. They originated with the establishment of the Atomic Energy Commission's nuclear proving ground which came to be knows as the Nevada Test Site (now, as mentioned, renamed the Nevada National Security Site).


Do you have a cite for that? I'd much appreciate it if you do. Thanks.



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 02:35 AM
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reply to post by puncheex
 


Well, for starters you could study any historic maps of the Nevada Test and Training Range (formerly Las Vegas Bombing and Gunnery Range, Nellis Air Force Range, etc.) and the Nevada National Security Site (formerly (Nevada Proving Ground, Nevada Test Site, etc.). You will notice that the the Air Force training site is not broken down into numbered areas (Range numbers on aerial navigation charts refer only to the airspace overhead). Only the nuclear test site is divided into distinct numbered areas. Area boundaries within the Tonopah Test Range (formerly Tonopah Ballistics Range) are not clearly defined even on the most detailed maps.

According to the Nevada Site Development Plan for the Nevada Test Site and North Las Vegas & Remote Sensing Laboratory Sites, prepared by REECo Services Nevada in August 1993, "To simplify the distribution, use, and control of resources, the NTS has been subdivided into defined and numbered areas; many of these areas have been assigned to specific groups for specific uses."



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 09:56 PM
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I have a number of TTR maps on this page:
TTR odds and end

This link will open up Google Earth with a NTS map overlay. It is the map they hand out on the Yucca Mountain Tour and is not available on the internet (well unless it came from me or somebody else scanned it).
NTS overlay

The TTR may comprise two NTS type area designations based on document I have found.
TTR area 52 or 54
Or possibly only one is correct.





 
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