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WWE: The Hart Foundation

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TRD

posted on Jun, 30 2004 @ 06:06 PM
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Bret Hart and Jim "The Anvil" Neidhart made up what was quite possibly the perfect combination of power and technical wrestling. During a time when the tag team division in the WWF was the strongest it had ever been, The Hart Foundation was one of the top teams. The Hart Foundation first enjoyed success as a heel team, backed by their manager Jimmy "The Mouth of the South" Hart, and then eventually became huge crowd favorites after losing the manager. As with all great tag teams, the Hart Foundation had a fantastic finishing move. In those days, a tag team finisher meant that both members of the tag team played helped to execute it. Today, the tag team finisher is largely a thing of the past.

In 1985 Bret achieved national exposure in the United States, when he joined the WWF, as a hardworking scientific wrestler, but he was relegated to low card status (it was the early days of Hulkamania). Manager Jimmy Hart saw Bret's potential, and decided to team him with Jim Neidhart, forming the rule breaking Hart Foundation. Many consider this to be one of the best tag teams ever, because of the successful mix of scientific skill and speed, with stunning power and brutality. The Hart Foundation won the WWF tag team titles, in 1987, from the British Bulldogs, with a little help from the referee Danny Davis, who Jimmy Hart had paid off. Bret and Neidhart continued their feud with the Bulldogs for a short while, before they continued their destruction of every team in their way.




Actually the Hart Foundation lost their title to the Rougeau Brothers, September 26, 1987, but the title was given back the next day, since Raymond hit Bret with Jimmy Hart's megaphone and covered him for the win when he was not the legal man. The Hart Foundation were champs for nine months, until they ran into Strike Force, who defeated the Hart Foundation for the titles. At WrestleMania IV, Bret and Neidhart were in a 20 man battle royal. Bret and Bad News Brown were the last two men in the ring, together they had eliminated the competition, Brown double crossed Bret, and eliminated him. This incident started the Hart Foundation's face turn, Bret feuded for a short while with Bad News Brown in some singles action, where he showed some of the stuff, which is his trademarks today.

When the Hart Foundation dropped Jimmy Hart as their manager, because he sold their title shot to the Fabulous Rougeaus Brothers, Jimmy Hart swore revenge, and he got it through Demolition, who defeated the Hart Foundation at Summer Slam 1988. But Jimmy Hart wanted more, and since he still had the contracts on the Hart Foundation, which meant, that he got a part of their money, which he gladly gave to his new team, the Fabulous Rougeaus Brothers, this started a feud between the two teams, with the Hart Foundation victorious. Between 1988 and 1990 the Hart Foundation wrestled every tag team, that the WWF put in front of them including Power & Glory (Hercules & Paul Roma) and the team of Greg Valentine and the Honky Tonk Man, with whom they feuded after Honky Tonk Man smashed his guitar to bits on the . of Bret Hart.




Until 1990 the Hart Foundation was a major player in the tag team scene, but they didn't receive many title shots, but they managed to defeat Demolition for the title, at Summer Slam 1990, in a 2 out of 3 falls. Bret and Neidhart held on to them for seven months, before dropping them to the Nasty Boys, who were under the guidance of Jimmy Hart. During their seven month regain, they also battled the Rockers, who won the titles, but since the top rope broke during the match, the title change wasn't acknowledged by the WWF. In addition, they were easily identifiable by their pink and black trunks and awesome entrance music. Bret Hart used his success in The Hart Foundation to propel himself to superstardom and become agruably the best singles wrestler of all time. Neidhart didn't enjoy the same success as Bret, staying as a mid-card and tag team wrestler, even teaming with Bret's brother Owen in later years. However, The Anvil always was one of the most recognizable faces in wrestling, whether he was on a tag team or not.




posted on Jun, 30 2004 @ 06:19 PM
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It takes a REAL man to wear pink and make it look good. The thing is that this team started with Stu Hart. He was the teacher, to so many wrestlers. Ie: Chris Benoit.

This era of wrestling was amazing, they had talent, the story lines were good.

BTW, I'd forgotten "the Mouth of the South."


TRD

posted on Jun, 30 2004 @ 06:28 PM
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Well the list of wrestling superstars that Stu Hart has personally trained reads like a "who's who" of top contemporary wrestlers. Of course, there are the Hart Brothers, Bret, Wayne, Owen, Keith, Ross, Smith. Although Smith, Bruce and Keith's ring careers did not last as long as many had hoped, they were nevertheless top performers during his time. Ross and Wayne Hart worked behind the scenes for Stampede, and although some of the Harts may have left the ring, they never left the sport, and continue to be a big part of the Canadian wrestling business to this day.

In addition to training his talented sons for a career in the ring, Stu Hart has helped launch the careers, as well as help hone the skills, of dozens of other wrestling superstars. Top performers like Gene Kiniski, Andre the Giant, Rick Martel, The British Bulldogs (Dynamite Kid and Davey Boy Smith), The Junk Yard Dog, Jim Neidhart, Dick "The Bulldog" Brower, The Wild Samoans, Bad News Brown, "Lethal" Larry Cameron, Brian Pillman, Chris Benoit, Chris Jericho and dozens more have all advanced (and in many cases, started) their careers by enhancing their skills in Hart's fabled "Dungeon".



posted on Jun, 30 2004 @ 06:42 PM
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This was THE golden age of wrestling. I remember the exact match where I got turned off. Ultimate Warrior vs Papa Sango. The voodoo puking thing. They could have won me back but then they had that Gen X thing where they made obscene gestures with their genitalia, ie: Shawn Micheals. Damn that was good wrestling before that.


TRD

posted on Jun, 30 2004 @ 06:50 PM
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Yeah i hear ya.

This was when i watched it alot late 70's through to the early 90's. Another one from the early era is The Steiner's (comming up soon). !

Thing is most of the time tag teams are formed when they decide to temporarily stick two singles competitors together. While there are a few dedicated tag teams, they don't stick together for long before they are split up to try and make a new storyline. Tag teams can never stay together for any length of time without splits and double-crosses going on in the background. Not like the ol day's when the Tag Team's were just as big as the individual stars of the time.



posted on Jun, 30 2004 @ 07:00 PM
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I remember a match that was the most real I had ever seen, damn bloody too. Randy "Macho Man" Savage vs Ricky "The Dragon" Steamboat. The moves were amazing, they beat the living # out of each other. This would have been around Wrestlemania 1. WOW!



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